Navigation Links
RSV to Blame for 1 in 13 Pediatrician Visits
Date:2/4/2009

Respiratory virus strikes healthy kids, and it affects more youngsters than flu, study finds,,,,

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- It's called respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a childhood infection that's responsible for one of every 13 visits to a pediatrician, and one of every 38 emergency room trips, a new study found.

What's more, the virus is to blame for inpatient hospital stays for one out of every 334 children. And, it's not just kids with underlying lung disease or immune system deficiencies -- the virus strikes healthy children, too.

"Although we've known for a long time that RSV is highly contagious and that RSV is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in young children, this study gives us an idea of how common RSV infections are in the various age groups," said the study's lead author, Dr. Caroline Hall, a professor of pediatrics and medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in New York.

Hall said that the incidence of RSV, particularly in children past infancy, was higher than the researchers had suspected.

"This study destroys some old paradigms," said Dr. Andrew Nowalk, an infectious disease specialist at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. "They [the study authors] found RSV to have a dramatic burden, even up to age 5. We've tended to assume that if you get past 1 year that RSV won't cause you many problems, but this study found that some older children were still being hospitalized."

RSV is a virus that causes cold-like symptoms, such as coughing, sneezing, runny nose, fever, a decreased appetite, and possibly wheezing. Nearly every child in America will have had RSV by the time they reach their second birthday, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And, in most children, the disease will be mild, so it's often indistinguishable from other winter-time illnesses, according to Hall.

The virus is transmitted through sneezing or coughing, though Hall said you'd have to be very close to someone to catch RSV directly. But, the virus can live on surfaces, like countertops, desks, phones, computer keyboards, and if you touch these items and then rub your eyes, or touch your nose or mouth, you may become infected.

The new study, published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, included more than 5,000 children from three metropolitan areas who were hospitalized or seen as an outpatient in either an emergency department or pediatrician's office. At two sites -- Rochester, N.Y. and Nashville, Tenn. -- data was collected from 2000 through 2004. The other site -- Cincinnati -- provided data for the 2003-2004 RSV season.

From that large sample of children, 919 tested positive for RSV infections. RSV was responsible for 20 percent of hospitalizations, 18 percent of emergency department visits, and 15 percent of pediatric office visits for acute respiratory infections from November through April, according to the study.

Hospitalizations for RSV infection occurred more frequently than did those for influenza, Hall said.

"We tend to think of influenza as a very serious player, but when you compare this to influenza, RSV is much higher. This study suggests there should be a little more urgency for finding RSV vaccines," Nowalk said.

The researchers also tried to pinpoint risk factors for RSV, but only found that being born prematurely or a young age were independent risk factors. Being in day care, having other children at home, having been breast-fed and even living in a home with a smoker didn't seem to significantly raise the risk of RSV.

"We could not show other specific risk factors, probably because RSV is ubiquitous. And, it's just so highly contagious. Between 20 and 40 percent of parents will also get RSV if a child gets it," Hall said.

Nowalk added, "This paper suggests that it's going to be hard to prevent exposure to RSV."

Both experts recommended frequent and thorough hand washing, and Hall said to disinfect common household surfaces more often and try to avoid being around anyone with RSV.

Hall has consulted for MedImmune, maker of Synagis, which is used to prevent RSV in infants and young children at risk for infection, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center news release.

More information

Learn more about RSV from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



SOURCES: Caroline Hall, M.D., professor, pediatrics and medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, N.Y.; Andrew Nowalk, M.D., assistant professor, pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; Feb. 5, 2009, New England Journal of Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. More Accidental Infant Deaths Blamed on Suffocation in Bed
2. Old, Fat Mice Blamed for Virus Transmission
3. Surgeons Often Are Blamed When Hip Replacements Fail
4. Toxic Chemicals Blamed for Gulf War Illness
5. Lung Cancer Patients Get Blamed for Their Disease
6. Hormones May Be to Blame for Womens Cavity Rates
7. Overeating? Blame Your Genes
8. Text-Messaging Injuries Blamed on Distraction
9. PRI: Pro-Life Leader Blames Feminist Groups for Slaughter of Girls
10. Chantix Blamed for Suicide in Lawsuit Against Pfizer Filed by Cory Watson Crowder & DeGaris
11. Road pollution blamed for higher allergy risk in kids
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice ... overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, ... a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... athletes and non-athletes recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as ... City area —Johnson is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have ... these feelings, many turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as ... Michigan, has released tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law ... magazine’s 2016 Legal Elite. The attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are ... , Seven Greenberg Traurig Shareholders received special honors as members of this year’s Legal ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the ... Genome magazine’s Code Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families ... to be presented at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition ... report to their offering. ... The World Market for Companion Diagnostics covers the world ... in the report includes the following: , ... by Region (N. America, EU, ROW), 2015-2020 , World ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, Inc ., (NASDAQ: ... inhaled drugs, announced today that it was added to ... its comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity ... an important milestone for Pulmatrix," said Chief Executive Officer ... of our progress in developing drugs for crucial unmet ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016  Arkis BioSciences, a ... invasive and more durable cerebrospinal fluid treatments, today ... The Series-A funding is led by Innova Memphis, ... and other private investors.  Arkis, new financing will ... and the market release of its in-licensed Endexo® ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: