Navigation Links
RI Hospital: Radiation can be reduced while maintaining high quality in CT colonography
Date:3/12/2013

PROVIDENCE, R.I. A new study by a Rhode Island Hospital researcher has found it's possible to maintain high-quality CT colonography diagnostic images while reducing the radiation dose. This is important as the use of CT colonography, or virtual colonoscopy, becomes more widely used for colorectal cancer screenings.

Through his research, Kevin J. Chang, M.D., of the department of diagnostic imaging, found that decreasing the tube voltage would not negatively impact the integrity of the CT colongraphy. His research is published in the current issue of the journal Radiology.

"Radiation dose is a concern for many in health care from the clinicians and patients to the government agencies that regulate the industry," Chang said. "The theoretical risks of radiation exposure as a cancer causing agent must be weighed realistically against the substantial benefits of colon cancer screening.

According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the U.S. The ACS estimates that in 2013, the U.S. will see 102,480 new cases of colon cancer, and 40,340 new cases of rectal cancer. Colorectal cancers are expected to cause about 50,830 deaths during 2013.

The study was conducted to assess the effect of decreasing the radiography voltage on dose and ultimately on 3D image quality in patients undergoing CT colonography, and how these changes are affected by patient size. After studying the CT colonography results in 63 patients, the results showed a statistically significant decrease in radiation dose while only slightly decreasing 3D image quality in patients of all sizes.

Chang says that more study is needed, but that he and other experts anticipate even more decreases in CT radiation dose in the coming years.

"Colorectal cancer screenings are an important part of preventative medicine," Chang said, "and by lowering the radiation dose, we can lower patients' concerns and their exposure, while maintaining the diagnostic quality of the exam and providing early detection and treatment."

Chang's principal affiliation is Rhode Island Hospital, a member hospital of the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island. He also has an academic appointment at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, department of diagnostic imaging. Other researchers involved in the study are William W. Mayo-Smith, M.D., Dominique B. Caovan, M.D., and David Grand, M.D., of Rhode Island Hospital's department of diagnostic imaging; and Walter Huda, Ph.D., of the Medical University of South Carolina, department of radiology and radiological science.


'/>"/>

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslinsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Inhaled Steroids Lead to Big Drop in Asthma Deaths at Texas Hospital: Study
2. Many Test Results Left Unread as Patients Leave Hospital: Study
3. RI Hospital: Near-complete blood flow restoration critical for best outcomes in stroke
4. RI Hospital: Standardized road test results differ from older adults natural driving
5. Antibody therapy prevents gastrointestinal damage following radiation exposure in mice
6. Diagnostic Scans Tied to Radiation Risk for Gastro Patients
7. CT Scans Deliver More Radiation to Obese People: Study
8. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy optimal for localized prostate cancer
9. Study examines adverse effects among different radiation therapies for prostate cancer
10. Chemo + Radiation Best for Bladder Cancer, Study Finds
11. Use of dedicated pediatric imaging departments for pediatric CT reduces radiation dose
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library ... City Observer , brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ... for fumigation is not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... and non-athletes recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a ... area —Johnson is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may ... to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To ... for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced that 20 Florida attorneys ... peers for this recognition are considered among the top 2 percent of lawyers practicing ... members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: Miami Shareholders Mark D. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... People across the U.S. are sharpening their pencils and honing ... contest in which patients and their families pay tribute to a genetic counselor by ... Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this September. , In ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... DUBLIN , June 24, 2016 ... and Markets has announced the addition of the ... their offering. ... products and provides an updated review, including its applications ... covering the total market, which includes three main industries: ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... BEIJING , June 24, 2016 Dehaier ... or the "Company"), which develops, markets and sells medical ... China , signed a strategic cooperation agreement with ... as "Hongyuan Supply Chain") on June 20, 2016, to ... Under the strategic cooperation agreement, Dehaier will leverage Hongyuan ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 According ... by Type (Standard Pen Needles, Safety Pen Needles), Needle ... GLP-1, Growth Hormone), Mode of Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - ... This report studies the market for the forecast period ... reach USD 2.81 Billion by 2021 from USD 1.65 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: