Navigation Links
Quitting smoking especially difficult for select groups
Date:2/12/2010

WASHINGTON With the national trend toward quitting smoking flat, psychologists are finding some success with treatments aimed at helping smokers from underserved groups, including racial and ethnic minorities and those with psychiatric disorders.

In a special section of this month's issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, researchers report on several effective treatments that may help these smokers in an effort to increase national smoking cessation rates. The percentage of American smokers rose from 19.8 percent in 2007 to 20.6 percent in 2008, after a 10-year steady decline in smoking rates, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"One of the reasons smoking rates have remained stagnant is because these underserved groups of smokers have not been adequately targeted by research and treatment," said the special section editor, Belinda Borrelli, PhD, who is with the Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine at Brown University Medical School. Underserved smokers include those who have a 10 percent higher smoking rate than the general population, have less access to treatments, and are more likely to be excluded from long-term treatments trials, according to Borelli.

In one article, researchers found that success in stopping smoking differed for different psychiatric disorders. For example, compared to smokers with no psychiatric disorders, smokers who had an anxiety disorder were less likely to quit smoking six months after treatment.

In the same article, researchers found that people's barriers to quitting were directly related to what type of psychiatric disorder they had. For example, smokers who had ever been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder reported a strong emotional bond with their cigarettes while smokers ever diagnosed with a substance use disorder reported that social and environmental influences were especially likely to affect their smoking. "This information may help clinicians gauge relapse risk and identify treatment targets among smokers who have ever had psychological illnesses," said lead author Megan Piper, PhD, from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

Evidence-based smoking cessation treatments are addressed in another article in this special section. Researchers from the University of Miami looked at the effect of intensive cognitive-behavioral therapy on African-American smokers. They placed 154 African-American smokers wearing nicotine patches into one of two six-session interventions. Participants in the group using cognitive-behavioral techniques were taught relapse prevention strategies and coping skills, along with other techniques. The other group participated in a health education series that explained general medical conditions that are associated with smoking, such as heart disease and lung cancer.

Compared with general health education, participation in cognitive-behavioral therapy sessions more than doubled the rate of quitting at a six month follow-up, from 14 percent to 31 percent the researchers found. "We know cognitive-behavioral therapy helps people quit, but few studies have examined this treatment's effect on African-American smokers," said the study's lead author, Monica Webb, PhD, of the University of Miami. "Hopefully, our findings will encourage smoking cessation counselors and researchers to utilize cognitive-behavioral interventions in this underserved population."

Borrelli, the section editor, examined another minority groupLatinos. She measured the amount of second-hand smoke in participants' homes and gave feedback to smokers about how much smoke their child with asthma was exposed to. For example, they were told that their child was exposed to as much smoke as if the child smoked 'x' number of cigarettes him- or herself during the week of the measurement this was the experimental group. Smokers in the control group underwent standard cognitive-behavioral treatment for smoking cessation. Smokers in the experimental group were twice as likely to quit as the control group, Borrelli found. "The child's asthma problems may provide a teachable moment for parents whereby they become more open to the smoking cessation messages," Borrelli said. "Providing treatment that is focused on the health needs of the family, and delivered in a culturally tailored manner, has the potential to address health care disparities for Latino families."


'/>"/>

Contact: Audrey Hamilton
ahamilton@apa.org
202-336-5706
American Psychological Association
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Age affects motivation for quitting smoking
2. Nicotine-Reduced Cigarettes Could Boost Quitting
3. New research review shows that your family doctor may be the key to quitting smoking
4. Quitting Marijuana Just as Hard as Quitting Cigarettes
5. Quitting smoking -- its never too late
6. Nicotine Replacement Therapy Is Safe, Effective and Can Help Reverse Mental Acuity Deficits in Smokers Who Are Quitting, Including Commercial and Private Pilots
7. MultiVu Video Feed: FREE NICOTINE REPLACEMENT THERAPY (NRT) TO BE OFFERED TO REGISTERED PILOTS INTERESTED IN QUITTING RELIEF IN LIGHT OF RECENT FAA RULINGS
8. Genes May Play Role in Quitting Smoking
9. Quitting Isnt That Easy
10. Trouble quitting?: A new Pitt-Carnegie Mellon smoking study may reveal why
11. Quitting Smoking Saves Lives and Money: New American Lung Association Report Finds Most States Failing to Adequately Protect Residents and Their Bottom Line
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/25/2017)... , ... April 25, 2017 , ... Lake Park Dental ... by using Invisalign® in Lutz, FL. With the help of this highly-effective, ... aesthetics with fewer potential complications, more discretion and less pain. , Drs. Sarah ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 25, 2017 , ... Buyers and ... recreational users to dispensaries and head shops –can’t help but be heartened by the ... the tell-tale cannabis odor aptly described as “skunk smell.” At last they can ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... healthcare products, is introducing Flexadin UCII, part of the EQUISTRO line, at this ... joint health in horses at the immunologic level. , The scientifically-developed Flexadin UCII ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... The Santana Telehealth Project was honored with the ... the American Telemedicine Association’s annual conference, on April 23 in Orlando, FL. , “I ... improve the lives of the poor and underserved in other parts of the world,” ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... ... Bright Pink , a national non-profit organization focusing on the prevention and early detection ... Pink is proud to announce Katie Thiede as their new Chief Executive Officer. In January, ... Chairman of the Board and launched a national search to find a visionary new leader ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... 2017 Eyevensys, a private biotechnology ... gene expression technology that enables the safe, local, sustained ... a wide range of ophthalmic diseases, announces it has ... Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to advance its technology into clinical ... The ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... , April 20, 2017 Research and ... Pharmaceutical Contract Manufacturing Services Market Analysis By Service (Manufacturing, Research), ... Forecasts, 2014 - 2025" report to their offering. ... The Latin American pharmaceutical ... billion by 2025 Low drug registration cost in ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... Cardiology devices segment is anticipated to reach the highest market ... segment is likely to create absolute $ opportunity of a ... By the end of 2027, Cardiology Devices segment is projected ... expanding at a CAGR of 18.4% over the forecast period. ... reprocessed medical devices market in terms of revenue ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: