Navigation Links
Public Smoking Bans May Spill Over to Households
Date:11/8/2011

TUESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking bans in public places have had a spillover effect by reducing smoking in homes as well, according to a new study.

U.S. researchers analyzed data from a nationally representative household survey of tobacco use and found that people who lived in counties with total smoking bans in workplaces, restaurants and bars were more likely to have total smoking bans at home.

Homes with children were most likely to be smoke-free, according to the study appearing online and in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

"Although the aim of clean indoor air laws is to reduce secondhand smoke exposure in public venues, our results show that these laws have the important additional benefit of stimulating smoke-free homes, with a larger association in homes occupied by smokers, protecting kids and other family members from secondhand smoke," lead investigator Stanton Glantz, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, said in a journal news release.

"Since the home remains a major source of secondhand smoke exposure for children, this work shows that an additional justification for enacting smoke-free legislation is the secondary effect of encouraging voluntary smoke-free rules at home, particularly in homes occupied by smokers," he concluded.

Another study published in the same issue of the journal found that the rate of total smoking bans in U.S. homes more than tripled from 1992-1993 to 2006-2007. However, only half of households with both smokers and children were smoke-free.

Increases in total smoking bans at home were "smallest among African-American households, and among households with older versus younger children. There were fewer smoke-free households below the poverty line, in households with less education and in states with high smoking prevalence," lead author Karen Messer, professor and director of biostatistics at Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego, said in the news release.

"Effective interventions to promote smoke-free homes among smoking families are needed, and this study can help identify populations that would benefit from such interventions," she added.

More information

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency outlines the health dangers of secondhand smoke.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, news release, Nov. 8, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Public lecture to explore intersection of economics, human behavior, and brain science
2. Emerging public health crisis linked to mortgage default and foreclosure
3. Public reporting hasnt improved transplant centers care
4. UMass Amherst School of Public Health wins $2.5 million training grant
5. Medical education needs more of a public health and prevention focus
6. Public ignorant about key messages concerning diet and cancer
7. Company stock prices before public announcements of oncology trial results
8. New study proposes public health guidelines to reduce the harms from cannabis use
9. New report on creating clinical public use microdata files
10. Diabetes public health: UCSF study highlights need for better guidelines
11. Public Often Unaware of a Drugs Safety Record -- Or Lack of One
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Public Smoking Bans May Spill Over to Households
(Date:7/22/2017)... ... July 22, 2017 , ... More than ... of patients not requiring pain medication after three months post-operatively. However, researchers presenting ... Meeting today in Toronto, Ontario, Canada found that those patients who were filling ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... The Ellis Agency, an eastern Georgie provider ... in a community wide charity event with the goal of bringing in support for ... woman who lives with epilepsy, recently launched a charity campaign of her own by ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... Philadelphia and Theater of Witness , was awarded a $300,000 grant ... humanities program which fosters empathy, comfort with ambiguity and the recognition of one’s ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... , ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... received a $5,000 grant from the C. R. Bard Foundation, Inc. ... at Somerset Hills , a service available through the nonprofit home care agency. ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... follow-up at 10 years, researchers from the Multicenter Orthopaedics Outcome Network (MOON) demonstrated ... life a decade after surgery, though activity levels decline over time. The study, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/10/2017)... , July 10, 2017 The Institute for ... methods, is the recipient of a VITROCELL® inhalation exposure ... International Science Consortium. The device, which is designed to ... expose human lung cells to airborne test materials in ... use the VITROCELL® system for testing combustible tobacco products, ...
(Date:7/10/2017)... , July 10, 2017  The tenth annual ... Boston, MA at the Sheraton Boston Hotel, ... unparalleled access to global decision makers and innovative biotech ... life science leaders during two impactful days. BioPharm America ... delegates with additional networking opportunities with 4,500+ life science ...
(Date:7/6/2017)... CINCINNATI , July 6, 2017 ThriveRx, the nutrition division ... and their families to thrive on nutrition support. To celebrate ... The new site has a fresh new look with improved organization to ... ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: