Navigation Links
Protein that provides innate defense against HIV could lead to new treatments
Date:5/25/2008

By identifying a protein that restricts the release of HIV-1 virus from human cells, scientists believe they may be closer to identifying new approaches to treatment. The research is published in the advance online edition of Nature Medicine.

Scientists have known that most human cells contain a factor that regulates the release of virus particles, but until now they have been uncertain about the factor's identity. Now a research team from Emory University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, and Mayo Medical School has identified CAML (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand) as the cellular protein that inhibits the release of HIV particles.

CAML works by inhibiting a very late step in the virus lifecycle, leading to the retention of HIV particles on the membrane of the cell. The virus has developed a means of counteracting CAML, through the action of the viral Vpu protein. When Vpu is absent, HIV particles don't detach from the plasma membrane and instead accumulate by a protein tether at the cell surface.

When the research team depleted CAML in human cells in the laboratory, they found that Vpu was no longer required for the efficient exit of HIV-1 particles from the cell. When they expressed CAML in cell types that normally allow particles to exit freely, the particles remained attached to the cell surface.

"This research is important because it identifies CAML as an innate defense mechanism against HIV," says senior author Paul Spearman, professor of pediatrics (infectious diseases) at Emory University School of Medicine. "We are continuing to work on the mechanism that Vpu uses to counteract CAML and on defining exactly how CAML leads to virus particle retention on the infected cell membrane. We hope this will lead us to new treatments."


'/>"/>

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory University
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1

Related medicine news :

1. Draining away brains toxic protein to stop Alzheimers
2. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
3. New prion protein discovered by Canadian scientists may offer insight into mad cow disease
4. Emory researchers identify signaling protein for multiple myeloma
5. Human C-reactive protein regulates myeloma tumor cell growth and survival
6. Lowering Blood Protein Wont Help Kidney Patients
7. Blood protein detects lung cancer, even at earliest stage
8. Natural Protein Could Help Spot, Treat Liver Cancer
9. Heat shock proteins are co-opted for cancer
10. How adhesive protein causes malaria
11. Loss of gene leads to protein splicing and buildup of toxic proteins in neurons
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/25/2017)... WI (PRWEB) , ... July 25, 2017 , ... ... Aloria Health, as medical director. Dr. Negrette has more than a decade of ... She has worked closely with individuals fighting addictions, eating disorders, psychotic and manic ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... July 24, 2017 , ... Engineers at ... bio-compatible, because it produces the same kind of electrical energy that the body uses. ... form of moving electrons. This flow of electrons out of the battery is generated ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Cosmetic Town, an online plastic surgery information community, announces ... on a daily basis. , The new video series will feature board-certified doctors ... their practices. , When asked about the new video series, the senior editor ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... July 24, 2017 , ... Peruvian Ayahuasca retreat, East ... awarded annually to and divided between two full-time university students enrolled in U.S. ... plant medicine. To apply for the scholarship, students are asked to submit an ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... July 24, 2017 , ... The Topricin Companies, formerly ... for Topricin’s revolutionary, natural, after-burn skin care product, Topricin After Burn Cream. ... long term skin conditions, including cancer. In the short term, overexposure to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/14/2017)... 2017 It should come as no surprise to ... in the midst of a crippling opioid epidemic. According to ... number of overdose deaths from opiate-based medications has quadrupled, Says, ... million dead from 2001 to 2015". During this time, the ... similarly quadrupled, drawing a compelling link between prescription and eventual ...
(Date:7/12/2017)... CarpalAID is a revolutionary new product that relieves painful ... Carpal tunnel syndrome affects more than 8 million people a year. ... men. The common methods of treating CTS are painful surgery, the ... or gloves. ... CarpalAID is a clear patch worn on the palm of ...
(Date:7/11/2017)... Md. , July 11, 2017  The global ... estimated revenues of approximately $394.1 million in 2016.  Although ... trend of solid growth, in particular as a result ... clinical practice, and the recent introduction of a significant ... need for less-invasive testing of tumor biomarkers to guide ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: