Navigation Links
Protein strongest just before death
Date:12/12/2012

Researchers at Michigan State University have discovered a protein that does its best work with one foot in the grave.

The study, which appears in the current issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, focuses on the nontraditional lifestyle of Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins, which could lead to new ways to treat cancer.

"Retinoblastoma proteins are unique in that they use controlled destruction to do their jobs in a timely but restrained fashion," said Liang Zhang, a lead author and MSU cell and molecular biology graduate student. "This is an unusual way for proteins to act."

As an organism grows, proteins essential for fueling its prosperity typically toe a tight line, performing their jobs at the right place and time. If these proteins go rogue, disasters such as cancer can result.

Retinoblastoma proteins, which could be labeled as rebellious as opposed to rogue, perform acts of valor rather than destruction. And just like fireworks, they save their best work for the finale.

Proteins' lifecycles end with degradation, and like most living things they become weaker and less efficient at their jobs near the end of their lives. For Retinoblastoma proteins, however, their destruction is linked to their ability to efficiently control excessive cell growth.

Using the fruit fly Drosophila, MSU researchers isolated the specific region that controls the protein's ability to degrade. Strikingly, this is the same region the protein uses to hit its stride and exert its full power to suppress genes related to unrestrained cell growth. Other categories of genes, such as those linked to cell death, may not be influenced by this specific region that controls degradation. This sheds light on a single mechanism that controls both living and dying at the genetic level.

Identifying this mechanism in fruit flies could be beneficial to humans. David Arnosti, MSU biochemist and director of MSU's Gene Expression in Disease Development initiative, noted the genetic similarities between humans and Drosophila, describing fruit flies as "resembling little people with wings."

"By revealing the molecular details about the regulation of the fly Retinoblastoma protein, we can start to understand the possible roles of the human counterparts in cancer," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Study paves way to design drugs aimed at multiple protein targets at once
2. Blood levels of immune protein predict risk in Hodgkin disease
3. Protein tied to cancer-drug resistance in mice
4. Protein tied to cancer drug resistance in mice
5. Metabolic protein launches sugar feast that nurtures brain tumors
6. Researchers implicate well-known protein in fibrosis
7. Protein test is first to predict rate of progression in Lou Gehrig’s disease
8. Protein tug of war points toward better therapies for cardiovascular disease
9. Targeting downstream proteins in cancer-causing pathway shows promise in cell, animal model
10. G proteins regulate remodelling of blood vessels
11. UMass Amherst cell biologists identify new protein key to asymmetric cell division
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Protein strongest just before death
(Date:2/9/2016)... Altamonte Springs, FL (PRWEB) , ... February 09, ... ... nation’s leading innovative specialty pharmacies, announces today the continuation of the ‘Pay It ... donations for each prescription referral received at our specialty pharmacy. , “Since ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... , ... The Journal of Pain Research has published the commentary ... As corresponding author Dr John F. Peppin says “Terminology matters, yet little attention has ... patients. ‘Chronic cancer pain’ and ‘chronic non-cancer pain’ are replete in the literature; ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... ... to expand access to affordable hearing aids , increase industry transparency, and ... in the United States. , “For the average consumer, the hearing aid industry ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... Maui, Hawaii (PRWEB) , ... February 09, 2016 , ... ... to Maui to lead a photographic adventure on the island, June 14-19, 2016, hosted ... Unforgettable Events series. , After a successful debut in 2015, the ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... i2i Systems, an early innovator and developer of ... in the latest KLAS report, Population Health Management 2015: How Far Can Your Vendor ... population health management (PHM). The latest KLAS Report, leveraging over 200 user interviews, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... India , February 10, 2016 ... The "Personalized Medicine, Targeted Therapeutics and Companion Diagnostic ... Trends, Technologies, Participants, and Environment" research report indicates ... worth over $149 billion by 2020 growing at ... up of companion diagnostics and targeted therapeutics and ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... Feb. 9, 2016  Landauer, Inc. (NYSE: LDR ... measurement and monitoring, outsourced medical physics services and high ... its fiscal 2016 first quarter ended December 31, 2015. ... Fiscal 2016 First Quarter Highlights , Revenue of ... quarter of 2015 , Domestic Radiation Measurement services revenues ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... , Feb. 9, 2016  Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc ... report its 2015 fourth quarter and full year financial ... of the financial markets.  Company management will host a ... p.m. EST/9:30 p.m. GMT to discuss fourth quarter and ... and financial update and guidance for 2016 financial results. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: