Navigation Links
Protein deficiency leads to faster fat burning in mice, study shows
Date:3/12/2008

COLUMBUS, Ohio Researchers have developed a new, lean mouse with characteristics suggesting that someday, using medication to manipulate a specific protein in humans could emerge as a strategy to treat obesity and disorders associated with excess weight, such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

To create the hybrid, scientists crossed mice deficient in protein kinase C beta (PKCB) with the C57 black mouse, a common animal used in research for studying diabetes and obesity.

These animals can eat more than normal. And they have less fat than normal. Thats a dream come true if it can be extended to human beings, said Kamal Mehta, senior author of the study and a professor of molecular and cellular biochemistry at Ohio State University.

He noted, however, that an appropriate therapy for humans would take years to develop.

At first glance, compared to mice with no deficiency, these new hybrid mice were smaller and leaner. And when the researchers looked under their skin, they saw the mice had less fat distribution in the skin itself and less fat tissue overall. They also had less fat in their livers and muscles. The fat cells they did have were smaller than fat cells in other mice.

And despite the propensity for obesity from their original genes, the new mice lost weight while eating up to 30 percent more food than other mice. This means their lower weight was not caused by less eating, suggesting the protein deficiency corrected for the obesity tendencies by increasing the hybrids ability to burn fat, said Mehta, an investigator in Ohio States Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute.

The research is published in a recent issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Based on his previous research on the role of PKCB in metabolism, Mehta expected a deficiency of the protein to affect how the body processes triglycerides, or fat stored in body tissue.

The bottom line is we were the first to show that this deficiency leads to a lean animal. The next question is why, Mehta said. In order to answer why, we need to know which genes are changed in these knockout animals.

The most prominent effect the scientists have been able to identify so far relates to the mitochondria, the principal energy source of cells. Mehta said the new hybrid mice have more mitochondria within their cells than do normal mice, and that the added energy source allows them to convert fatty acids into energy.

We have shown to some extent that there is increased fatty acid oxidation. We found that they use more oxygen, so that means they are using this oxygen to metabolize fat, convert it into carbon dioxide and expel it when they breathe, said Madhu Mehta, a clinical consultant and co-author on the study and assistant professor of internal medicine at Ohio State.

The research group is testing this finding with an additional experiment, introducing the PKCB deficiency to animals with a lower production of mitochondria to see if the level of mitochondria increases when the protein is not present.

More work also needs to be done to determine whether the protein could be deficient in just certain types of cells to produce the same effect for example, by eliminating the protein from only liver cells or fat tissue cells rather than throughout the body. Under current circumstances, the deficiency is present in the entire mouse genome.

So we need to find which specific tissue needs the deficiency. Once we know which tissue is crucial for this, we can target that, Kamal Mehta said. The whole idea is to be able to develop a drug that would safely create this deficiency in humans.

Mehta also is leading a study testing the effect of PKCB deficiency on diabetes in particular, examining whether the disease can be prevented by the elimination of this protein. An excess of triglycerides in tissue can lead to insulin resistance, a hallmark of diabetes. Because the protein relates to how the body burns triglycerides, Mehta believes the deficiency also could play a role in preventing the disease from developing.

The deficiency does not appear to pose any health problems. The mice with the deficiency lived a normal lifespan and experienced no premature deaths.

It remains unknown whether the deficiency currently exists naturally in humans. Genetic testing of lean people could help answer that question, Mehta said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kamal Mehta
Mehta.80@osu.edu
614-688-8451
Ohio State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. University of Pittsburgh researchers crack code of 3-D structure in key metabolic protein
2. UCF researchers discover a new protein family implicated in inflammatory diseases
3. Scientists Engineer Protein That Could Battle Strep
4. New protein discovery helps researchers understand autoimmune diseases
5. Protein in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Controls Malignant Tumor Cells
6. Sticky blood protein yields clues to autism
7. Penn scientists find a protein that inhibits Ebola from reaching out to infect neighboring cells
8. Embryonic Stem Cell Protein Inhibits Melanoma
9. Protein in embryonic stem cells control malignant tumor cells
10. Novel mechanism found that may boost impaired function of leukemia protein
11. Cancer-related protein may play key role in Alzheimers disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 24, 2017 , ... Studies show evidence that ... the risk of visual loss in these patients. , But how often do ophthalmologists ... smoking cessation to patients at risk of or with early symptoms of AMD? A ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 , ... ... plastic surgeon practicing in Newburgh, New York, has recently begun offering three new ... to offering the best cutting-edge procedures and reducing downtime, Dr. Rubinstein is excited ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Everybody has their own personal preference ... to read it, and some people don't like it at all. FindaTopDoc took a ... found: , Erotic literature can give readers a taste of their deepest, darkest fantasies ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 , ... The Aesthetic ... facelift . Dr. Talei has come up with a proprietary technique that he calls ... lifts tissues that have dropped. For all ages, patients can expect to look refreshed, ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... , ... June 23, 2017 , ... ... Cancer Conference from Sept. 18 to 20. , The two-day conference is focused ... with the goal of improving patients’ lives and eliminating racial breast cancer-related disparities. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/14/2017)... Va. , June 14, 2017  ivWatch LLC, ... and effectiveness of intravenous (IV) therapy, is pleased to ... the category of Nonsurgical Hospital Supplies and Equipment at ... awards program for the medtech industry. The award was ... the Jacob K. Javits Center in New ...
(Date:6/12/2017)... -- Kineta, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on the development ... of R&D and Head of Virology Kristin Bedard has been ... Northwest and Beyond meeting sponsored by Life Science Washington. ... 8:30-10:30 AM PDT at the Agora Conference Center in ... will be joined by other leaders in infectious disease research ...
(Date:6/9/2017)... INDIANAPOLIS , June 9, 2017 More ... a further effort to help spread lessons learned from ... the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Eli Lilly and ... for the second phase of the Bringing Research in ... reaffirming their commitment to helping people with diabetes effectively ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: