Navigation Links
Protein Differences May Explain Long-Term HIV Control
Date:11/4/2010

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Variations in an immune system protein explain the rare ability of some HIV-infected people to remain healthy without having to take any medications, scientists say.

The finding could help in efforts to develop new HIV treatments and vaccines, the study authors pointed out.

The immune system is able to suppress viral replication and keep viral load at extremely low levels in about one in 300 HIV patients. These patients are called HIV controllers.

U.S. researchers analyzed the genomes of about 1,000 HIV controllers and 2,600 HIV patients with progressive infection. The controllers had variations in five amino acids in a protein called HLA-B, which alerts the immune system to the presence of infection.

The study was conducted by researchers at the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT and Harvard, and from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

"We found that, of the three billion nucleotides in the human genome, just a handful make the difference between those who can stay healthy in spite of HIV infection and those who, without treatment, will develop AIDS," co-senior author Dr. Bruce Walker, director of the Ragon Institute, said in a Ragon Institute/Broad Institute news release.

"Earlier studies had showed that certain genes involved with the HLA system were important for HIV control. But they couldn't tell us exactly which genes were involved and how they produced this difference," co-senior author Paul de Bakker, of the Broad Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in the news release. "Our findings take us not only to a specific protein, but to a part of that protein that is essential to its function."

The study is published online Nov. 4 in the journal Science.

"HIV is slowly revealing its secrets, and this is yet another," Walker said. "Knowing how an effective immune response against HIV is generated is an important step toward replicating that response with a vaccine. We have a long way to go before translating this into a treatment for infected patients and a vaccine to prevent infection, but we are an important step closer."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more about HIV/AIDS.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Ragon Institute/Broad Institute, news release, Nov. 4, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. New and Delicious, Almond Butter Filled, Cookie Bites With 35.7% Protein to Help Manage Weight and Build Muscle
2. Research highlights role of protein pair in obesity regulation
3. Urine protein test might help diagnose kidney damage from lupus, UT Southwestern researchers find
4. Smithfield, United Food and Commercial Workers Union, and Food Networks Paula Deen to Deliver 150,000 Servings of Protein to San Francisco Food Bank
5. Protein Sciences Corporation Announces Profitable and Cash Flow Positive Results for 2009 and Management Realignment
6. Protein Appears Key to Intestinal Balance
7. SIBLING proteins may predict oral cancer
8. Damaged protein identified as early diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimers disease in healthy adults
9. Cells of aggressive leukemia hijack normal protein to grow
10. Omega Protein Comments on California Lawsuit Alleging Fish Oil Contaminants
11. Proteins May Predict Spread of Colon Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Protein Differences May Explain Long-Term HIV Control 
(Date:8/24/2017)... ... August 24, 2017 , ... Lori ... the development and advances in Desensitization therapy to improve the outcomes of organ ... about his remarkable journey of his 25 years of research in developing therapies ...
(Date:8/24/2017)... ... August 24, 2017 , ... Prime candidates for home ... have a condition that needs further monitoring such as surgery, stroke, heart attack ... stable, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart/lung disease, arthritis and stroke. ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The Arc Mercer, Capitol County’s premier provider of programs and ... community organization for people with special needs. The group, the Special Needs Alliance for ... of New Jersey – but the first in the entire country! , SNAP was ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Drs. Steven White and Brad Haines are pleased to announce ... of this offer, valued at more than $300 per year, new patients can enjoy ... patients receive a complimentary professional whitening procedure. , Stained or yellowed tooth enamel ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... ... Awards have announced the winners of the Best of the IBA Awards in The 2017 ... in the 2017 IBAs were not able to apply for the Best of the IBA ... awards won in the IBAs with a Gold Stevie win counting for three points, a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2017)... 2017   Mostyn Law and Gulf Coast Regional Blood ... . The Mostyn Law family has had 3 ... is why Mostyn Law is partnering with Gulf Coast ... its appreciation. Blood supplies are running low. Gulf Coast ... hospital needs in August. That is why the blood center reached ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... , Aug. 15, 2017  AOTI Inc. announced today that ... Therapy Inc., has recently opened a New York City Office in ... usage of its unique Topical Wound Oxygen (TWO 2 ) homecare ... the Accreditation Commission for Health Care (ACHC) under the company,s DMEPOS ... ...
(Date:8/8/2017)... -- BioLineRx Ltd. (NASDAQ/TASE: BLRX), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused ... for the second quarter ended June 30, 2017. ... and to date: ... Company,s lead project, BL-8040: Announced plans ... novel stem cell mobilization treatment for autologous bone-marrow transplantation ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: