Navigation Links
Protective bacteria in the infant gut have resourceful way of helping babies break down breast milk
Date:8/13/2012

A research team at the University of California, Davis, has found that important and resourceful bacteria in the baby microbiome can ferret out nourishment from a previously unknown source, possibly helping at-risk infants break down components of breast milk.

Breast milk is amazingly intricate, providing all of the nutrients necessary to sustain and strengthen infants in the first months of life. Moreover, this natural source of nutrition provides protection from infections, allergies and many other illnesses.

Breast milk also promotes the growth of protective bacteria in an infant's intestine. Because breast milk contains glycans (complex sugars) that infants cannot breakdown, it promotes the growth a specific type of bacteria, called bifidobacteria, that can process these glycans. While it is known that bifidobacteria avail themselves of the free glycans in breast milk, it was not known whether these bacteria could also obtain glycans that were linked to proteins. Such proteins are called glycoproteins, and they are abundant in breast milk.

The research team led by David A. Mills at the UC-Davis investigated the ability of bifidobacteria to remove glycans from milk glycoproteins. Their work was recently published in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics.

Mills' group found that specific strains of bifidobacteria possessed enzymes capable of removing glycan groups from glycoproteins, enabling them to use these glycans as an additional food source. Surprisingly, one of the enzymes, EndoBI-1, was able to remove any type of N-linked glycan (glycans attached to proteins by the amino acid asparagine). This is unique among enzymes of this type and may provide a growth advantage for bifidobacteria in the infant intestine because the glycoproteins in breast milk have complex glycans attached.

Mills explains that the ability of EndBI-1 to remove a variety of complex N-linked glycans combined with its unusual heat stability make "this potentially a very useful tool in both food processing and proteomics/pharmaceutical research."

The team's work suggests that bifidobacteria do not primarily feed on the glycans from milk glycoproteins. However, the study did show that under the proper conditions bidfidobacteria can grow when protein-linked glycans are the only energy source.

"One obvious goal of this research is to find ways to translate the benefits provided by milk and bifidobacteria to at risk populations such as premature infants, malnourished children, among many others," Mills says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Angela Hopp
ahopp@asbmb.org
240-283-6614
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. NIH team describes protective role of skin microbiota
2. Study identifies possible protective blood factors against Type 2 diabetes
3. Not taking gastroprotective drugs prescribed with anti-inflammatory medicines
4. Chronic exposure to staph bacteria may be risk factor for lupus, Mayo study finds
5. Leveraging bacteria in drinking water to benefit consumers
6. AuCoin gets $600,000 to refine new test for deadly bacterial infection melioidosis
7. Researchers unveil molecular details of how bacteria propagate antibiotic resistance
8. TB treatment paradox: Mouse studies show bodys own response helps TB bacteria survive
9. Dietary fiber alters gut bacteria, supports gastrointestinal health
10. New mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis discovered
11. Bacterial Vaginosis Increases Female-to-Male HIV Transmission Risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/27/2017)... MD (PRWEB) , ... July 27, 2017 , ... ... Teams of entrepreneurs will compete to form startup companies around 117 breakthrough inventions ... Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering), ...
(Date:7/27/2017)... ... July 27, 2017 , ... Cremations recently surpassed traditional burials ... Association, this trend is expected to continue with over 70% of Americans projected to ... demand for new innovations that enable families to celebrate the life of a lost ...
(Date:7/26/2017)... ... 2017 , ... An inventor from Salisbury, N.C., knows the difficulties involved with ... and dignified way to keep leeches in place during therapy," she said. "That’s why ... an effective way to keep a leech in place on the skin during therapy. ...
(Date:7/26/2017)... ... July 26, 2017 , ... Written By: ... a major advancement in drug therapy for patients living with relapsing and primary ... a novel B cell targeted therapy that has been proven to significantly reduce ...
(Date:7/26/2017)... , ... July 26, 2017 , ... ... Management Solutions as part of their continued efforts to provide innovative offerings to ... the best IT resources and build dynamic, high-performing teams to address healthcare IT’s ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/20/2017)... -- Prime Therapeutics LLC (Prime) released this statement from its Chief ... for Clinical and Economic Review,s (ICER) public meeting ... of abuse-deterrent formulations (ADF) of opioids. Prime was the sole ... "The ICER data ... use of abuse-deterrent formulations (ADF) in opioids in terms of ...
(Date:7/14/2017)... 14, 2017 Endo International plc (NASDAQ: ENDP ... 8, 2017.  Members of its senior management team will host a ... 8:30 a.m. ET. The dial-in number to access ... (678) 509-7598, and the passcode is 45397076. Please dial in 10 ... A replay of the call will be available ...
(Date:7/13/2017)...  New York City-based market research firm Kalorama Information notes ... of.  From new products to new costs, to the threat ... completed study, Potential Pipeline Disruptors . Among ... 1.  Age-Driven Growth - True Impact Moment Arriving   ... impact the growing population and, to a more extreme extent, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: