Navigation Links
Protection for stressed-out bacteria identified

An international team of researchers is a step closer to understanding the spread of deadly diseases such as listeriosis, after observing for the first time how bacteria respond to stress.

The research, published in the October issue of the prestigious international journal Science, details how a huge molecule called a stressosome protects bacterial cells from external stress and danger.

Scientists from the University of Newcastle in Australia, and Newcastle University and Imperial College in the United Kingdom, collaborated on the discovery.

Associate Professor Peter Lewis from the Faculty of Science and Information Technology at the University of Newcastle in Australia said until now, researchers had not fully understood how bacteria responded to stress and potential danger.

"It is important to understand the changes that occur when bacteria are under stress as this is the point at which they are likely to become most infectious.

"The protein molecules that make up the stressosome are found in a very wide range of bacteria. Some of these bacteria cause diseases such as listeriosis that has a 30 per cent mortality rate, and melioidosis that has a mortality rate as high as 90 per cent and is a significant health problem in northern Australia and south-east Asia.

"With bacteria becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, understanding how the stress response is controlled could lead to the development of drugs that help prevent bacterial infection from occurring."

Lead author of the Science paper, Professor Rick Lewis from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, said the team used groundbreaking techniques to observe the stressosomes. Electron microscopy techniques were developed by Professor Marin van Heel of Imperial College and Associate Professor Peter Lewis developed the fluorescence microscopy imaging techniques.

"We knew that when bacteria were stressed, a warning signal would be sent from the surface to the inside of the cell. The stressosome would then respond by triggering new proteins in the cell to react to the stress.

"Our latest work has revealed the structure and number of stressosomes per cell. This has helped us understand how quickly the stressosomes respond to external stresses and prepare the cell to adapt to changes in its environment and ensure its survival."


Contact: Blythe Hamilton
Research Australia

Related medicine news :

1. Survey reveals disparities in skin cancer knowledge, protection among high school students
2. Scientists Develop Natural Protection for Stored Foods
3. Despite overeating, morbidly obese mice gain protection against diabetes
4. DuPont Focused on Meeting Global Demands for Greater Safety & Protection
5. Residual fetal cells in women may provide protection against breast cancer
6. Hospital Coalition Says Governors No-Fault Bill Signing Provides a Great Protection for Florida Consumers
7. Mesalamine linked to cancer protection for high risk inflammatory bowel disease patients
8. Long Term Care Newsletter Debuts, Published by LTC Financial Partners; Advice on Living Better, Not Just Longer, With Financial Protection
9. Abbotts Environmental Protection Initiatives Again Recognized by the State of Illinois
10. Safe Sex Passport Launches to Provide Breakthrough Protection Against STDs and HIV
11. URAC Names Medco as a Finalist in First-ever Best Practices in Consumer Empowerment and Protection Awards
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice ... overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, ... a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Dr. Calvin Johnson has dedicated ... has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for treating his patients. The procedure ... doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances that orthopaedic surgeons use to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have experienced ... feelings, many turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a ... has released tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law ... magazine’s 2016 Legal Elite. The attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are ... , Seven Greenberg Traurig Shareholders received special honors as members of this year’s Legal ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the ... Genome magazine’s Code Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families ... to be presented at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, Inc ., ... developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that it was ... Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set of U.S. and ... "This is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," said Chief ... shareholder awareness of our progress in developing drugs for ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Any dentist who has made an implant ... process. Many of them do not even offer this as ... high laboratory costs involved. And those who ARE able to ... a high cost that the majority of today,s patients would ... Parsa Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and inventor ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Capricor ... ), a biotechnology company focused on the discovery, ... that patient enrollment in its ongoing randomized HOPE-Duchenne ... exceeded 50% of its 24-patient target. Capricor expects ... third quarter of 2016, and to report top ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: