Navigation Links
Prostate cancer test improves prediction of disease course
Date:6/15/2009

A new prostate cancer risk assessment test, developed by a UCSF team, gives patients and their doctors a better way of gauging long-term risks and pinpointing high risk cases.

According to UCSF study findings, published this week, the test proved accurate in predicting bone metastasis, prostate cancer-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality when localized prostate cancer is first diagnosed. The test is known as the UCSF Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment, or CAPRA.

The study, involving 10,627 men, is reported in the June 9 online edition of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

"This test should help physicians and their patients predict the likely course of the individual's disease," said Matthew R. Cooperberg, MD, MPH, lead investigator of the study. Cooperberg, who helped develop the risk assessment test, is a prostate cancer specialist in the UCSF Department of Urology and the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

"In this study, we looked at the CAPRA score's ability to predict mortality across multiple forms of treatment. It should help patients and clinicians decide which tumors need to be treated, and how aggressively. We also hope that in the research setting it can serve as a well-validated and consistent means of classifying men into low, intermediate and high risk groups."

Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. This year, an estimated 192,280 men will be diagnosed with the disease, and 27,360 men will die from it, according to the American Cancer Society.

While prostate cancers are ultimately lethal, most men diagnosed actually die of other causes. Because of the highly variable nature of the disease, risk assessment to calculate the chances of cancer progression takes on heightened importance when a patient is diagnosed, said Cooperberg. At the time of diagnosis, only 5 percent of men have metastasis.

More than 100 risk assessment tests have been developed in recent years, but most are unable to predict long-term outcomes and are applicable to just one form of treatment, rather than providing information relevant to multiple treatment modalities.

Because of these limitations, UCSF developed the CAPRA test. It calculates patient risk through five factors: age at diagnosis, Gleason score (a measure of how aggressive the cancer cells appear under the microscope), PSA score (prostate-specific antigen level in the blood), percentage of biopsy scores that test positive for cancer, and clinical tumor stage based on digital exam of the prostate and/or ultrasound.

"The goal of risk assessment is to find the patients at high risk of mortality and treat them aggressively, and for others to guide their treatment or surveillance plan accordingly,'' said Cooperberg.

The CAPRA test has been independently validated in three studies as being accurate and consistent in predicting pathological and biochemical outcomes after radical prostatectomy (surgery to remove the prostate gland).

The UCSF study was intended to measure the accuracy of CAPRA for its ability to predict metastasis or mortality.

The study looked at men from the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE). A national disease registry launched by UCSF in 1995, it tracks prostate cancer patients at 40 primarily community-based urology practices across the United States.

The patients in the study had undergone radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, androgen deprivation therapy (hormone therapy), or watchful waiting.

Nearly 3 percent (311) of the men developed bone metastases, 2.4 percent (251) died of prostate cancer, and 14.9 percent (1,582) died of other causes.

The CAPRA score accurately predicted all three outcomes.

The study determined that with each point increase in CAPRA score, the risk of death from prostate cancer increases 39 percent; with each two-point increase in score, risk roughly doubles. The tool can predict risk up to 10 years.

"Given its high degree of accuracy and ease of calculation, the CAPRA score may prove an increasingly valuable tool for risk stratification in both the clinical practice and the research setting,'' wrote the study authors.


'/>"/>

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
efernandez@pubaff.ucsf.edu
415-476-2557
University of California - San Francisco
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Longer Hormone Treatment May Improve Prostate Cancer Outlook
2. Hormone therapy may confer more aggressive properties to prostate tumors
3. Effective over-the-counter prostate cancer test kit likely in next few years
4. Diet may reduce risk of prostate cancer
5. Gene Test Helps Detect Prostate Cancer
6. New blood test greatly reduces false-positives in prostate cancer screening
7. Poniard Pharmaceuticals Announces Positive Efficacy and Safety Data From Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Picoplatin in Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer
8. Why some prostate cancer returns
9. Enlarged Prostate and Erectile Dysfunction Are Subjects of Free Mens Health Seminar
10. Predicting higher risk for prostate cancer diagnosis
11. Carbohydrate restriction may slow prostate tumor growth
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... 2016 , ... On Tuesday, April 26, 2016 members of the HomeTown Health ... Gov. Nathan Deal on SB 258, the “Rural Health Care Relief” Bill. , The ... tax credit to individuals and corporations which donate directly to a “rural hospital” in ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Coast Dental Fort Stewart is celebrating ... new location in the Exchange Furniture Mall at 112 Vilseck Road in Fort Stewart. ... Smart TV. Plus attendees will have the opportunity to meet general dentists Thomas Richards, ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... and engineer of patented products, announces the Gyrociser, an exercise invention which aids ... worth $2 billion," says Scott Cooper, CEO and Creative Director of World Patent ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Reltok Nasal Products proudly ... for the head and neck/ear, nose and throat specialty, has added the KOTLER NASAL ... KOTLER NASAL AIRWAY™ is a newly patented safety device secured by nasal surgeons ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... enterprise focused entirely on patients with cancer, today announced that Lynne Malestic, RN, ... the 2016 CURE® Extraordinary Healer® for Oncology Nursing , which honors nurses ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... , April 29, 2016  In the ... projected to shift from systems dependent on CRTs monitors ... types of modality CRT Medical monitors and will ... are a host of foreseeable benefits to this ... will existing modalities have to be replaced in ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ReportsnReports.com adds "Pulmonary Arterial ... report that provides an overview of the PAH ... stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of ... type, along with latest updates, and featured news ... involved in the therapeutic development for Pulmonary Arterial ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Jersey , April 29, 2016 ... Suite for Life Sciences, Product Development Capabilities in ... Life Science Customer Base . ... provider, today announced the acquisition of Skura Corporation,s ... global leader in adaptive sales enablement technology for ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: