Navigation Links
Promising drug combination may help those with ocular melanoma that has spread
Date:9/4/2007

DURHAM, N.C. -- A combination of two drugs shows promise in treating a rare and therapy-resistant type of melanoma that originates in the eye and spreads to other organs, according to a new study led by Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers.

The drugs -- decitabine, which can turn on certain genes in cancer cells, and interferon gamma, an immune system protein -- may work together to cause cancer cell death.

Metastatic uveal melanoma, or melanoma that originates in the eye and spreads to other parts of the body, has been very difficult to treat, in fact there have been no effective therapies to date, said Jared Gollob, M.D., a medical oncologist at Duke and lead investigator on the study. This study could lead to a very promising new therapy for patients who previously had very little hope.

The researchers published their findings in the September 1, 2007 issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

This pre-clinical study came on the heels of previous lab work examining proteins called interferons, which originate from immune system cells. These proteins were shown to boost immune function and directly affect melanoma cells, inhibiting their growth and accelerating their death, Gollob said.

We also knew that a drug called decitibine could turn on genes that had been turned off in cancer cells, so we speculated that if we combined decitabine and interferon gamma, we might see heightened cell death, and thats exactly what happened, Gollob said. Decitabine may turn on a certain gene, called S100A2, that is, in turn, able to increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to interferon gamma, he said.

Researchers used human cell lines, derived from patients who had been diagnosed with uveal melanoma, for this study. The next step will be a clinical study looking at the effectiveness of this drug combination in human subjects, Gollob said.

Uveal melanoma affects about 5,000 to 10,000 people each year in the United States. Unlike its counterpart on the skin, there are no known risk factors, Gollob said.

There are really no truly effective treatments for this devastating disease, he said. So this study really is a promising step toward finding a therapy that can really help these patients.

Uveal melanoma originates in the colored part of the eye, and symptoms include changes in vision, such as blurriness. If found early, it can be treated with radiation or with removal of the eye. When it spreads, uveal melanoma is typically unresponsive to standard treatment regimens, such as chemotherapy, Gollob said. Life expectancy once the disease has spread is about six to ten months, on average, he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Lauren Shaftel Williams
lauren.shaftel@duke.edu
919-684-4966
Duke University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. PCR emerging as a promising technique for Diagnosing Urinary Tuberculosis
2. Experimental treatment for Ebola Virus Shows promising results in mice
3. A promising treatment for wart removal
4. Hepatitis shots is promising
5. Promising Treatment for Diabetes
6. Life after Bypass not so Promising for Women.
7. Promising cure for West Nile Virus
8. Deadly Diarrhoea Vaccine – Trail Results Promising
9. Novartis MS Drug Shows Promising Results
10. Sunitinib a Promising Agent for Treatment of Renal Cell Cancer
11. Research Ethics Requirements Compromising Quality of Health Research
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a weight loss fitness plan that ... the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, , All ... They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise program , ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 hand-drawn hand gesture animations, ... Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProHand Cartoon’s package transforms ... Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator and drag it above ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s a matter of indulgence ... high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those who set the bar ... from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to set low expectations is ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 ... ... 12th International Conference and Scientific Sessions in Dallas that it will receive two ... Announcement of the grants came as PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... People across the U.S. are sharpening their pencils and honing their ... in which patients and their families pay tribute to a genetic counselor by nominating ... of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this September. , In April, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Any dentist who has ... of the current process. Many of them do not even ... technical difficulties and high laboratory costs involved. And those who ... it at such a high cost that the majority of ... Dr. Parsa Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016  In a startling report released today, ... their residents by lacking a comprehensive, proven plan to eliminate prescription ... definitive ranking of how states are tackling the worst drug crisis ... four states – Kentucky , New ... Vermont . Of the 28 failing states, three – ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition ... - Forecast to 2022" report to their offering. ... to date financial data derived from varied research sources to ... potential impact on the market during the next five years, ... of sub markets, regional and country level analysis. The report ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: