Navigation Links
Promising New Antimicrobials Could Fight Drug-Resistant MRSA Infection, New Georgia State Study Finds
Date:11/30/2015

A novel class of antimicrobials that inhibits the function of a key disease-causing component of bacteria could be effective in fighting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the major drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, according to researchers at Georgia State University.

Their study showed that small molecule analogs that target the functions of SecA, a central part of the general bacterial secretion system required for viability and virulence, have potent antimicrobial activities, reduce the secretion of toxins and can overcome the effect of efflux pumps, which are responsible for multi-drug resistance.

Their findings indicate that targeting SecA is an attractive antimicrobial strategy against MRSA and may be several times more effective than the antibiotics now available for treating the infection.

MRSA causes serious hospital and community-acquired infections. Healthcare-associated MRSA infections are typically linked to invasive procedures or devices, such as surgeries, intravenous tubing or artificial joints. Community-acquired MRSA often begins as a skin boil and is spread by skin-to-skin contact. Individuals at risk include competitive wrestlers, child care workers and those living in crowded conditions.

“We’ve found that SecA inhibitors are broad-spectrum antimicrobials and are very effective against strains of bacteria that are resistant to existing antibiotics,” said Binghe Wang, Regents’ Professor of Chemistry at Georgia State, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Drug Discovery and Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar. He co-led the study with Phang C. Tai, Regents’ Professor of Biology at Georgia State, who is an expert on the functions of SecA in bacteria. Their findings were published in the journal Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry in November.

Because of the widespread resistance of bacteria to antibiotics on the market, there is an urgent need for the development of new antimicrobials. MRSA infection is caused by a type of Staphylococcus bacteria that has become resistant to many antibiotics used to treat ordinary staph infections, according to the Mayo Clinic.

In previous work, the researchers developed novel small molecule SecA inhibitors active against the bacteria strains Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by dissecting a SecA inhibitor called Rose Bengal (RB).

In this study, they evaluated two potent RB analogs for their activity against MRSA strains. The RB analogs inhibited the ATPase activities of two SecA isoforms identified in S. aureus, SaSecA1 and SaSecA2, as well as the SaSecA1-dependent protein-conducting channel. The inhibitors also reduced the secretion of three toxins from S. aureus and stopped three MRSA strains of bacteria from reproducing.

The best inhibitor in this group, SCA-50, showed strong activity against MRSA Mu50 strain and an inhibitory effect on MRSA Mu50 that was two-to-60 times more potent than all commonly used antibiotics, including vancomycin, the last resort option for treating MRSA-related infections.

In a study recently published online in the journal ChemMedChem, the researchers synthesized and evaluated another new class of triazole-pyrimidine analogs as SecA inhibitors. This study also confirmed that SecA inhibitors have the potential for being broad-spectrum antimicrobials, can directly block virulence factor production and can null the effect of efflux pumps.

Collaborators for the paper published in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry include Hsiuchin Yang, Hao Zhang, Krishna Damera, Ying-Hsin Hsieh, Arpana Sagwal Chaudhary, Jianmei Cui and Jinshan Jin of Georgia State.

The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health and Georgia State’s Center for Biotechnology and Drug Design and Molecular Basis of Diseases Program.

To read the study, visit http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0968089615300523.

The ChemMedChem study is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cmdc.201500447.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/12/prweb13105510.htm.


'/>"/>
Source: PRWeb
Copyright©2015 Vocus, Inc.
All rights reserved


Related medicine news :

1. Newly-Published Review of Promising Mesothelioma Drug Finds Value Questions Remain, According to Surviving Mesothelioma
2. Promising Western Colorado SHAPE Results to be Presented at PCPCC Fall Conference: Nearly 5 Percent Lower Total Cost of Care
3. Promising Results Arise from Phase 2 Vaccine Study for Mesothelioma
4. NIH-Funded Research Develops Promising Gene Therapy for Cancer Treatment Side Effect
5. Researchers Say Mesothelioma Vaccine Looks Promising So Far, According to Surviving Mesothelioma
6. Promising Data Released on New Mesothelioma Therapy
7. Promising Vaccine Therapy for Glioblastoma Brain Cancers Moves on to Larger, Multisite Study
8. WesternU and Sight Savers America provide vision-impaired children with a promising future
9. New Mesothelioma Study Calls IMRT/Surgery Combo “Innovative and Promising”, According to Surviving Mesothelioma
10. New Research Finds Hair Grafting a Promising Therapy for Chronic Leg Ulcers - International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery Awards Research Grant
11. CIO Review Selects SIGNiX as a 20 Most Promising Pharma and Life Sciences Technology Solution Provider in 2015
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 12, 2017 , ... Information about the technology: , Otomagnetics ... enable prevention of a major side effect of chemotherapy in children. Cisplatin and ... For cisplatin, hearing loss is FDA listed on-label as a dose limiting toxicity. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... HMP , a ... of a 2017 Folio Magazine Eddie Digital Award for ‘Best B-to-B Healthcare Website.’ Winners ... October 11, 2017. , The annual award competition recognizes editorial and design excellence across ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... On Saturday, October 21, ... relay – Miles by Moonlight to raise money for the American Heart Association Heart ... , Teams will work together to keep their treadmills moving for 5 hours. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... first interactive health literacy software tool, and the Cancer Patient Education Network (CPEN), ... patient education, today announce a new strategic alliance. , As CPEN’s strategic ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Vohra Chief ... advancements to physician colleagues, skilled nursing facility medical directors and other clinicians at ... of Wound Care." , "At many of these conferences we get to educate ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/25/2017)... PROVIDENCE, R.I. , Sept. 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... immunogenicity assessment, vaccine design, and immune-engineering today announced ... focused on the development of personalized therapeutic cancer ... and has provided exclusive access to enabling technologies ... MSc Eng., MBA will lead EpiVax Oncology as ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ANN ARBOR, Mich. , Sept. 19, 2017 HistoSonics, Inc., a venture-backed medical ... the precise destruction of targeted tissues, announced three leadership team developments today:   ... Josh Stopek, PhD ... ... Veteran medical device executive ...
(Date:9/13/2017)... OrthoAtlanta has been named the official orthopedic and sports ... the 2018 College Football Playoff (CFP) National Championship to be ... Atlanta, Georgia . OrthoAtlanta is proud to ... in many activities leading up to, and including the national ... OrthoAtlanta ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: