Navigation Links
Programming cells to home to specific tissues may enable more effective cell-based therapies
Date:10/27/2011

Boston, MA - Stem cell therapies hold enormous potential to address some of the most tragic illnesses, diseases, and tissue defects world-wide. However, the inability to target cells to tissues of interest poses a significant barrier to effective cell therapy. To address this hurdle, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have developed a platform approach to chemically incorporate homing receptors onto the surface of cells. This simple approach has the potential to improve the efficacy of many types of cell therapies by increasing the concentrations of cells at target locations in the body. These findings are published online in the journal Blood on Oct. 27, 2011.

For this new platform, researchers engineered the surface of cells to include receptors that act as a homing device. "The central hypothesis of our work is that the ability of cells to home to specific tissues can be enhanced, without otherwise altering cell function," said corresponding author Jeffrey M. Karp, PhD, co-director of the Regenerative Therapeutics Center at BWH and a principal faculty member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. "By knowing the 'zip code' of the blood vessels in specific tissues, we can program the 'address' onto the surface of the cells to potentially target them with high efficiencies."

While conventional cell therapies that include local administration of cells can be useful, they are typically more invasive with limited potential for multiple doses. "You can imagine, that when the targeted tissue is cardiac muscle, for example to treat heart attacks or heart failure, injecting the cells directly into the heart can be an invasive procedure and typically this approach can only be performed once," said Dr. Karp, also an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and affiliate faculty Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.

Using the platform the researchers created, the cells are prepared to travel directly to the area of interest after being injected through a common and much less invasive intravenous infusion method. "These engineered cells may also be more effective because multiple doses can be administered" stated Debanjan Sarkar, PhD, previously a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Karp's lab and now an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the State University of New York, University at Buffalo.

"The necessity for a more effective delivery approach stems from the potential diseases cell therapy may address," said Dr. Karp, noting that the approach can be used to systemically target bone producing cells to the bone marrow to treat osteoporosis, cardiomyocytes to the heart to treat ischemic tissue, neural stem cells to the brain to treat parkinson's disease, or endothelial progenitor cells to sites of peripheral vascular disease to promote formation of new blood vessels.

The researchers concluded that, as the understanding of the mechanisms of cell trafficking grows, the ability to improve homing to specific tissues through engineered approaches should significantly enhance cell therapy by reducing the invasiveness of local administration, permitting repeat dosing, and potentially reducing the number of cells required to achieve a therapeutic effect, ultimately providing better outcomes for patients.
'/>"/>

Contact: Holly Brown-Ayers
hbrown-ayers@partners.org
617-534-1603
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. OASIS Recognized for Brain Fitness Programming
2. Adritech Software Releases Website Realizer, a Website Builder to Create Websites without Any Programming Knowledge
3. University of Michigan Health System earns major grant to expand childhood obesity programming
4. Fetal programming of disease risk to next generation depends on parental gender
5. New Study Uses Adult Stem Cells in Effort to Save Limbs of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease
6. New study suggests stem cells sabotage their own DNA to produce new tissues
7. Attacking cancer cells with hydrogel nanoparticles
8. UCR researcher identifies mechanism malaria parasite uses to spread in red blood cells
9. Pittsburgh Neurosurgeons Explore Use of Drug that Illuminates Brain Tumor Cells To Guide Surgery
10. New tool illuminates connections between stem cells and cancer
11. Bitter melon extract attacks breast cancer cells
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Programming cells to home to specific tissues may enable more effective cell-based therapies
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Despite last week’s media reports hinting at ... company to wait until March 2017 for an interest rate increase, according to Rajeev ... of Business. , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are of interest ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... with discovery of thousands of defective respirators, according to court documents and SEC ... case of William and Becky Tyler v. American Optical Corporation, Case No. BC588866, ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Connor Sports, ... as a partner for the Tamika Catchings Legacy Tour that will commemorate ... leader in hardwood basketball surfaces in all forms and levels of the game, Connor ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... a significant negative impact on long-term patient survival, reports a team of UPMC ... online this week in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, provide critical ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Catalent Pharma Solutions, the ... consumer health and global clinical supply services, today announced two key appointments and ... continued investment and strategic growth plans in the Asia Pacific region. , Howard ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... , Germany and ... QIAGEN N.V. (NASDAQ: QGEN ; Frankfurt Prime ... a licensing and co-development agreement with Therawis Diagnostics GmbH to ... will be to develop and market PITX2 as a marker ... other high-risk breast cancer patients. "We are pleased ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... 25, 2016 As illustrated by ... this month, the numbers and momentum of cannabis in ... into the billions, more research and development push the ... State of Legal Marijuana Markets Report  from from ArcView ... much of the increase in sector is attributed to ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , May 25, 2016 ... the precision of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) analysis ... the appointment of Professor Clive Morris ... leadership across the clinical development programme, scientific collaborations, ... help deliver significant improvements in clinical outcomes for ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: