Navigation Links
Programming Change in Defibrillator Implants May Lower Death Risk: Study
Date:11/7/2012

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A simple change to the way doctors program implantable cardioverter defibrillators can help people with heart disease live longer and with greater quality of life, according to a new study.

Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are devices that correct dangerous heart rhythms.

Researchers found that simply raising the heart rate at which the device is set to deliver a shock resulted in an 80 percent to 90 percent drop in unnecessary, distressing and painful shocks for heart rhythms that aren't life threatening. They also found that patients' risk of death fell 55 percent compared to patients with traditional ICD programming.

The study was published Nov. 6 in the New England Journal of Medicine and the findings are scheduled for Tuesday presentation at the American Heart Association meeting in Los Angeles.

"The way we've been using implantable defibrillators for the last 20 years has really been less than optimal," said lead study author Dr. Arthur Moss, a professor of cardiology at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, N.Y. "The extent to which the new programming reduced death and inappropriate therapies was quite striking and has the potential to beneficially affect a wide spectrum of patients who are at risk for sudden death or rhythm disorders."

The study involved 1,500 patients with heart disease from 98 hospitals in the United States, Canada, Europe, Israel and Japan during a two-year period that ended in October 2011. All of the patients received either an ICD or another type of defibrillator called a CRT-D made by Boston Scientific, the company that sponsored the study.

Most defibrillators are set to administer a shock when a person's heart rate exceeds about 170 beats per minute. The researchers said, however, that rates of 180 or 190 are not always life-threatening, do not last long and could simply be the result of increased physical activity. They noted that ICDs are not always able to determine which heart rhythms are dangerous in this range.

By setting ICDs at a higher rate of 200 beats per minute, the patients' risk of receiving an unnecessary shock fell 79 percent, the study found. Fewer shocks also meant less energy delivered to patients' hearts, which may have lowered their risk of death.

"There is considerable research to suggest that there is a small amount of damage to the heart muscle with each delivered shock," Moss said. "If we can eliminate the unnecessary shocks, this is going to be associated with less heart damage and improved outcomes."

Each year, 200,000 ICDs are implanted in the United States, according to the release.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health provides more information on implantable defibrillators.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, Nov. 6, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Steffi Nossen School of Dance Gears Up for Summer with Exciting Programming for All Ages
2. Early treatment sparks striking brain changes in autism
3. Time Change Means Turning Clocks Back on Sunday
4. Institute for Population Health Improvement releases buyers guide for health information exchange
5. Health Reform 2.0: States Balking at New Insurance Exchanges
6. Gene Mutation Changed Cheetahs Spots to Stripes
7. Flip-Flop? People Can Change Moral Positions and Not Know It
8. Woman Finds Balance in Life Via Drastic Change
9. National deficit outlook unchanged under Obama: UMD policy analysis
10. Combat Stress Linked to Brain Changes in Study
11. How language change sneaks in
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Programming Change in Defibrillator Implants May Lower Death Risk: Study
(Date:5/25/2016)... Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... May 25, 2016 , ... There was a time when ... women are going with the flow and turning to menstrual cups, like Lunette . ... party, Lunette is introducing their new anthem in this catchy video ! , ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... New studies published ... injured workers across 15 states. The outcomes examined in these studies include recovery ... care, and satisfaction with medical care. , “The goal of the studies is ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... The ... Drug Development through Molecular Imaging.” The focus of ADDMI-IG will be geared towards ... and development pipeline issues. Through ADDMI-IG WMIS will provide a platform for productive ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , ... May 25, 2016 , ... ... to industries ranging from medical and pharmaceutical, to food and HVAC facilities. Their ... as on-site training. , For medical applications, Afrimesure offers a variety of ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... The University of San Francisco (USF) has named ... lead a team of more than 100 full-time faculty and staff, and serve as ... in late August. , Baker comes to USF from the University of Washington in ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... , May 25, 2016 Digital Health ... to it by the US Patent and Trademark ... technology includes proprietary processes for electronic opt-­in and ... and wellness programs, HIPAA compliance and otherwise. ... "Our technology allows for ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... 2016 ReportsnReports.com adds "Chronic ... that provides an overview on therapeutic pipeline of ... stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of ... type, along with latest updates, and featured news ... involved in the therapeutic development for Chronic Cough ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 ... beide primären Endpunkte und ... Überlegenheit in ‚ausgezeichneter plus guter ... Colons    ,      (Logo: ... gab heute neue positive Daten von der MORA-Studie ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: