Navigation Links
Previous Infant Death Linked to Raised Risk of Stillbirth
Date:9/21/2011

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose first baby died within a year of birth are at increased risk for stillbirth in subsequent pregnancies, and the risk is especially high among black women, researchers report.

The new study looked at 2,483 women with previous infant death (defined as the death of a child during the first year of life) and 317,867 women whose infant survived the first year of life. Among all the women in the study, there were 1,347 cases of stillbirth during the second pregnancy, a rate of 4.2 per 1,000.

The researchers found that, overall, women with previous infant death were 2.91 times more likely to experience stillbirth in their subsequent pregnancy than those whose infants survived the first year of life.

However, black women with previous infant death were 4.28 times more likely to experience subsequent stillbirth than other black women, and white women with previous infant death were 1.96 times more likely to experience subsequent stillbirth than other white women.

Black women were 9.46 times more likely than white women to experience stillbirth, and women whose first baby died were more likely to be black, obese and smoke during pregnancy, the University of South Florida and University of Rochester researchers found.

On average, infants born to mothers with previous infant death were 293 grams smaller at birth than those born to mothers whose previous infant survived the first year of life, according to the study published in the Sept. 21 issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

In addition, the investigators found, mothers who experienced previous infant death were nearly twice as likely to have complications in their subsequent pregnancy as women whose infants survived their first year -- 10.9 percent vs. 6.7 percent, respectively.

"Our findings show that there are large disparities in infant mortality rates between white and black women and highlight the need for improved public health efforts to reduce infant mortality," principal investigator Dr. Hamisu Salihu, a professor in the department of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of South Florida, College of Public Health, said in a journal news release. "It is important that clinicians note the potential risk for subsequent stillbirth following infant mortality when they speak with patients in the period preceding their next pregnancy."

More information

The March of Dimes has more about stillbirth.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, news release, Sept. 21, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. MDS, a blood cancer, strikes nearly 5 times more Americans than previously thought
2. Copy-and-paste DNA more common than previously thought
3. Scripps Research scientists uncover previously unknown natural mechanism that controls cocaine use
4. Phantom limbs more common than previously thought
5. Treatment of retinal conditions appears to have changed significantly in previous decade
6. Drug reduces the increase in fear caused by previous traumatic experiences in mice
7. Thirdhand smoke may be bigger health hazard than previously believed
8. Quadruple therapy shows 100 percent SVR for HCV patients previously unresponsive to treatment
9. Long-term study shows that kidney transplants are faring better than previously reported
10. Barretts esophagus carries lower risk of malignancy than previously reported
11. Previous cancer history increases chances of clotting disorders after knee surgery, study suggests
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Previous Infant Death Linked to Raised Risk of Stillbirth
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... August 16, 2017 , ... In 1987, McDaniel & ... years in business this year, and they’re marking the milestone by undertaking a ... their patients. , It stands to reason that, given the central importance ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... August 16, 2017 , ... ... has received a three-year grant totaling $975,000, renewing its funding from the Health ... Human Services. , This funding marks, the fourth time the HRSA administration has ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... August 16, 2017 , ... SGNA Standards ... after every reprocessing cycle, both between patient procedures and before storage, is a ... is as important to the prevention of disease transmission and nosocomial infection as ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... August 16, 2017 , ... Connexion Point, a technology-enabled ... list for the fourth consecutive year. With 197% revenue growth over the ... the nation’s fastest growing companies. , Previous honors include ranking 86th on ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... TX (PRWEB) , ... August 16, 2017 , ... ... the United States, named Dr. Douglas J. Harrison, as the new Medical Director of ... be the new facility Medical Director of our Sienna Plantation location,” said Dr. Michael ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2017)... Tenn. , July 31, 2017 Three Tru-D SmartUVC ... Yongsan, South Korea . Tru-D, short for "Total Room ... and operating rooms after an environmental services (ES) professional cleans the area ... ... "Although the ...
(Date:7/27/2017)... EXTON, Pa., July 27, 2017  West Pharmaceutical Services, ... financial results for the second-quarter 2017 and updated financial ... Second-Quarter 2017 Highlights Reported ... 2.5% over the prior-year quarter. Net sales at constant ... 2017 reported-diluted EPS was $0.51, compared to $0.60 in ...
(Date:7/25/2017)... BARCELONA, Spain and CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts ... SOM Biotech, specializing in repurposing drugs to treat rare nervous ... Therapeutics Inc. to clinically develop and market the drug SOM0226 ... reached, the drug achieved very promising results in a Phase ... A new office in the United ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: