Navigation Links
Prenatal Healthcare Providers Inconsistent In Weight Gain Counseling
Date:3/22/2010

A new study from UCSF shows that prenatal health care professionals are concerned about patients’ excessive weight gain during pregnancy but have difficulty providing effective counseling.

(Vocus) March 24, 2010 -- A new study from UCSF shows that prenatal health care professionals are concerned about patients’ excessive weight gain during pregnancy but have difficulty providing effective counseling.

Rates of excessive weight gain during pregnancy, which is associated with short- and long-term adverse health outcomes for mothers and children, have increased in the United States according to the researchers. Health care providers agree that weight gain is an important topic to broach with pregnant women, yet the researchers identified inconsistent counseling styles among clinicians as well as barriers preventing doctors and nurses from discussing the issue. Barriers include insufficient training, concern about the sensitivity of the topic and the perception that counseling is ineffective.

Study findings will be reported in the April 2010 issue of the Journal of Women’s Health and are available online this month at http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/jwh.2009.1462.

“Clinicians in the study raised concerns about shaming or stressing pregnant women, and often wait for patients to raise the question of proper weight gain. Many providers – especially physicians – also said they lacked education in weight management issues,” said Naomi E. Stotland, MD, lead author of the study and assistant professor in the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences.

The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy are widely accepted by professional medical organizations. However, several providers said they did not proactively share the ranges with patients. Another clinician intentionally advised weight gain above the guidelines to avoid causing the patient anxiety and another thought the IOM weight gain guidelines are too high.

Of more than four million births annually in the United States, nearly 60 percent of mothers begin pregnancy either overweight or obese, so prenatal care may be an opportune time for healthcare providers to help women make positive lifestyle changes in nutrition and physical activity that affect weight, Stotland said.

During pregnancy, perhaps unlike any other time in a woman's life, most women see a healthcare provider frequently to receive prenatal care. Pregnant women may be especially motivated to make lifestyle changes out of concern for the health of their offspring.

“It is important to identify new tools that will enable clinicians to more easily and effectively counsel pregnant woman so that together they can determine strategies to achieve the healthiest weight for that individual,” Stotland said. “I also would encourage women to initiate the conversation if their doctors are not raising the topic of weight gain.”

“Simple messages from clinicians to patients about nutrition and physical activity during pregnancy have been shown to have an important positive impact on patient behaviors. We encourage clinicians to take this opportunity to improve the health of their patients. Every pregnant woman has the potential to leave pregnancy in better health than when she began pregnancy,” according to Barbara Gerbert, PhD, senior author of the study and professor in the Division of Behavioral Sciences, Professionalism, and Ethics, UCSF School of Dentistry.

The researchers conducted seven focus groups with a total of 52 participants from the San Francisco Bay Area. Obstetrician/gynecologists comprised three groups, and there were two groups each of certified nurse midwives and nurse practitioners.

Other authors include Paul Gilbert, ScM, and Alyssa Bogetz, BS, of the Division of Behavioral Sciences, Professionalism, and Ethics, UCSF School of Dentistry; Cynthia C. Harper, PhD, of the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; and Barbara Abrams, PhD, of the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

Media Contact:
Karin Rush-Monroe
UCSF News Office
(415) 476-2557
Karin.Rush-Monroe(at)pubaff(dot)ucsf(dot)edu

###

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/03/prweb3765494.htm.


'/>"/>
Source: PRWeb
Copyright©2010 Vocus, Inc.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Prenatal Stress May Boost Babys Asthma Risk
2. HAPPYBABY Unveils Partners Prenatal Instructional Yoga DVD
3. UM School of Medicine finds prenatal cocaine exposure not severely damaging to growth, learning
4. Good Parenting Triumphs Over Prenatal Stress
5. Mount Sinai finds prenatal exposure to certain chemicals affects childhood neurodevelopment
6. Prenatal exposure to flame-retardant compounds affects neurodevelopment of young children
7. GOOOH Declares Disgust With the Politics of Healthcare
8. Cinergy Health Commentary on House Healthcare Bill
9. Employer Healthcare Costs Jump 7.3% in 2009, According to Thomson Reuters Study
10. Rep. Fattah Says Healthcare Reform Will Work, But Get Ready for Nonsensical Talk About Repeal
11. Rep. Fattah Says Small Businesses in Philadelphia Are Big Winners in Todays Healthcare Reform
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Prenatal Healthcare Providers Inconsistent In Weight Gain Counseling
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... ... Team Type 1 Foundation, a nonprofit organization pursuing a global mission of education, ... with a Microsoft Corp. employee-led hackathon team for the 2017 Microsoft One Week Hackathon ... 1’s mission overlaps seamlessly with Microsoft’s mission to empower every person and every organization ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... Falls Church, VA (PRWEB) , ... July 20, ... ... Improve Your Bottom Line, **An FDAnews Webinar**, Aug. 9, 2017 — 1:30 p.m. ... a secret weapon to passing inspections and boosting quality. , It’s known as ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... July 20, 2017 , ... The Business Architecture Guild® ... Knowledge (BIZBOK® Guide )v 6.0 is now available for member download. This release ... collaborative teams. , Non-members may download the Part 1 Introduction for free ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... July 19, 2017 , ... A local summer theatre ... funds raised to support fine arts programs in Chester County’s Elementary Schools. In ... University’s Loyd Auditorium. , More than 850 people attended the two performances, ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... Western University of Health Sciences College ... grant to train predoctoral dental students in providing care to vulnerable children ages ... , The Predoctoral Pediatric Training Project (PPTP), a five-year grant, recognizes the curriculum ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/10/2017)... July 10, 2017  The tenth annual BioPharm ... MA at the Sheraton Boston Hotel, September ... access to global decision makers and innovative biotech startup ... science leaders during two impactful days. BioPharm America is ... with additional networking opportunities with 4,500+ life science industry ...
(Date:7/5/2017)... of over 2,000 employees and a leader in environmental and life science testing, ... position as the top American owned and operated environmental testing firm in ... ... The ... , enhances Pace Analytical,s capability as an innovative full service provider in the ...
(Date:6/30/2017)... POINT, N.C. , June 29, 2017  Axium Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... for developing improved novel formulations and alternative dosage forms of ... ... delivery is based on our waterless self-nano emulsifying formula, which ... contact with saliva. We believe the spray will provide fast ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: