Navigation Links
Powerful Antacid Drugs Raise Fracture Risk
Date:8/11/2008

Proton pump inhibitors taken for more than 7 years quadrupled chance of hip breaks, study finds

MONDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- New Canadian research shows that long-term use of proton pump inhibitors for acid reflux, peptic ulcers and related disorders elevates the risk of osteoporosis-related fractures.

This is now the third large study finding an increased risk of such fractures in people who use these medications. This latest study, reported in the current issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, found the longest period of time from starting the drugs to seeing problems emerge.

Physicians and patients may need to curb their enthusiasm for prescribing proton pump inhibitors, which have surged in popularity, experts said.

"Almost all of us gastroenterologists and internists have become complacent about the use of these medications," said Dr. Felice Schnoll-Sussman, director of research at the Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health, Weill Cornell Medical Center at New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. "This makes us all take a step back and look at all the patients we have on these medications and ask whether they require still being on this medication, at this dosage, at this frequency. Can we make some alterations in their dosing regimen? Can we switch them? Do they need to be on anything at all at this point?"

An option for patients who can't do without PPIs would be to add osteoporosis medications, added Dr. Elton Strauss, chief of orthopedic trauma and adult reconstruction at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City. "The other thing is that patients have to be made aware that if they are taking these medications [PPIs], and they drink or smoke or take drugs like prednisone, they don't do well orthopedically."

PPIs are powerful antacid drugs prescribed for peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other related conditions. Brand names include Aciphex, Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix. The drugs are often taken for indefinite periods of time.

The drugs work by inhibiting secretion of hydrochloric acid; this may affect calcium absorption in the small intestine.

The mechanism by which extended use of proton pump inhibitors increases the risk of fracture is unknown; however, it is most likely due to the acid-inhibiting effects of proton pump inhibitors accelerating the rate of bone mineral loss.

The authors of this study, from University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, examined administrative claims data for 15,792 individuals over 50 who had had osteoporosis-related fractures of the hip, vertebra or wrist, then compared them with almost 50,000 controls.

Individuals who had used proton pump inhibitors for seven or more years had almost double the risk of an osteoporosis-related fracture. There was also a 62 percent increased risk of hip fracture after five or more years of using PPIs; the risk of hip fracture jumped to more than quadruple after seven or more years.

"From this newest article, the comfortable zone looks like a length of time longer than the other studies, seven years, which is a nice amount of time. That's enough time for any type of peptic ulcer disease to improve," Schnoll-Sussman said.

Other patients may have to stay on the drugs indefinitely, but some could benefit from diet and other lifestyle modifications, especially for those who have returned to old eating habits after experiencing the benefits of the drugs.

"Some people think, 'If I take PPIs, I can eat garbage all day long,' " Schnoll-Sussman said. "We need to tighten up on those patients. These medications are not without any kind of risk."

Another new study, this one in the Aug. 11/25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, concluded that it is cost-effective to add over-the-counter proton pump inhibitors to the regimens of patients over age 65 with clogged arteries who take long-term, low-dose aspirin. Aspirin carries a risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Adding PPIs may also be cost-effective for patients down to the age of 50.

More information

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on GERD.



SOURCES: Felice Schnoll-Sussman, M.D., assistant clinical professor, medicine, and director, research, Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health, Weill Cornell Medical Center at New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York City; Elton Strauss, M.D., chief, orthopedic trauma and adult reconstruction, Mr. Sinai Medical Center, New York City; Canadian Medical Association Journal


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. A powerful literature and pathway mining system released to the public for free access
2. Researchers develop powerful tool to study the genetics of inflammation
3. Worlds most powerful MRI ready to scan human brain
4. MammaPrint(R) Breast Cancer Test Shown To Be Powerful Tool for Prognosis Prediction in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patients
5. Brain Cells More Powerful Than You Think
6. Light powered platinum more targeted and 80 times more powerful than similar cancer treatments
7. Minorities Less Likely to Get Powerful Painkillers in ER
8. Lighting up the powerful global smoking lobby
9. Varian and BrainLAB Announce Rapid Uptake of Powerful and Versatile Radiosurgery Platform
10. Your Business Card is a Powerful Marketing Tool
11. Inaugural Stanford International Pro-Am Winner A Remarkable Story in Determination And the Powerful Impact of St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Powerful Antacid Drugs Raise Fracture Risk
(Date:2/20/2017)... Plano, Texas (PRWEB) , ... February 20, 2017 ... ... vital signs technology, welcomes you to stop by for a visit this week ... IT professionals, clinicians and executives from around the globe. Sensogram will be featured ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... ... February 20, 2017 , ... Chuck E. Cheese’s® and Center for Autism and ... at Chuck E. Cheese’s locations throughout New England, New York and New Jersey to ... experience the fun of visiting Chuck E. Cheese’s in a sensory-friendly environment. , ...
(Date:2/19/2017)... ... February 19, 2017 , ... ProBrand Glitch is a set of 30 glitch distortion ... users can easily reveal any logo with a glitch reveal in just a few clicks ... the style and animation of each preset. Use these presets to add a uniquely animated ...
(Date:2/18/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Butler Mobility invited Ken Matthews to ... other Butler products. Ken was impressed with the safety and reliability of the ... product on his show. This endorsement by Ken Matthews can be heard on ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Smiles by Seese is ... in Davidson, NC. Dr. Brian Seese leads the practice as a skilled and highly ... one roof. Smiles by Seese serves patients of all ages with excellence in general, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/20/2017)... ORLANDO, Fla. , Feb. 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... are helping physicians diagnose and treat patients with ... will provide wireless connectivity for ZywiePro, Zywie,s cardiac ... AT&T Control Center . AT&T ... accessible monitoring for those with the disease. The ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... DUBLIN , Feb 20, 2017 ... "Hernia Repair Devices Global Market -Forecast to 2022" report ... ... obesity, the rise in aging population, rising adoption of tension ... are driving the growth of hernia repair devices global market. ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... SAN FRANCISCO , February 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ...  is expected to reach USD 58.4 billion by ... View Research, Inc. The market is driven by ... to serve future growth opportunities to the market. ... initiated with an aim of identifying emerging viruses ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: