Navigation Links
Potential treatments from cryptic genes
Date:6/1/2008

Big pharma gave up on soil bacteria as a source of antibiotics too soon, according to research published in the June issue of Microbiology. Scientists have been mining microbial genomes for new natural products that may have applications in the treatment of MRSA and cancer and have made some exciting discoveries.

"Over the last eight years we have been looking for new natural products in the DNA sequence of the antibiotic-producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor," said Professor Gregory Challis from the University of Warwick. "In the last 15 years it became accepted that no new natural products remained to be discovered from these bacteria. Our work shows this widely-held view to be incorrect."

In 1928 Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, which was subsequently developed into a medicine by Florey and Chain in the 1940s. The antibiotic was hailed as a 'miracle cure' and a golden age of drug discovery followed. However, frequent rediscovery of known natural products and technical challenges forced pharmaceutical companies to retreat and stop looking for new molecules.

Currently the complete genetic sequences of more than 580 microbes are known. It is possible to identify pathways that produce new compounds by looking at the DNA sequences and many gene clusters likely to encode natural products have been analysed. 'Genome mining' has become a dynamic and rapidly advancing field.

Professor Challis and his colleagues have discovered the products of two cryptic gene clusters. One of the clusters was found to produce several compounds that inhibit the proliferation of certain bacteria. Three of these compounds were new ones, named isogermicidin A, B and C. "This discovery was quite unexpected," said Professor Challis. "Our research provides important new methodology for the discovery of new natural products with applications in medicine, such as combating MRSA infections."

The other product they discovered is called coelichelin. Iron is essential for the growth of nearly all micro-organisms. Although it is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust it often exists in a ferric form, which microbes are unable to use. "The gene cluster that directs production of coelicehlin was not known to be involved in the production of any known products," said Professor Challis. "Our research suggests that coelichelin helps S. coelicolor take up iron."

Many researchers have followed Professor Challis and his colleagues into the exciting field of genome mining. "In the near future, compounds with useful biological activities will be patented and progressed into clinical or agricultural trials, depending on their applications" said Professor Challis.


'/>"/>

Contact: Lucy Goodchild
l.goodchild@sgm.ac.uk
44-011-898-81843
Society for General Microbiology
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Most caregivers of young children lack basic knowledge of potentially toxic household products
2. Conseco Declines Proposal from Steel Partners II, L.P.; Proposal Would Reduce Consecos Financial Flexibility and Potentially Disadvantage Other Shareholders
3. UNC study firms up promise of potential new cervical cancer screening tool
4. A potential route for human tumor gene therapy
5. High Growth Potential for Carotid Stent and Thoracic Aortic Stent Graft Markets
6. Phase 3 GATTEX results presented at DDW highlight potential new treatment in short bowel syndrome
7. Estimated 3.2 million Burmese potentially affected by cyclone
8. Most Baby Boomers are Financially Unprepared for a Potential Disability
9. New report: Arthritis is a potential barrier to physical activity for adults with diabetes
10. Improving anxiety treatment through the help of brain imaging: A potential future treatment strategy
11. Preliminary Results from Phase 2 Genzyme Study Highlight Potential of Novel Oral Compound for Gaucher Disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... Center, Sedona, Arizona’s Premier Center for Shamanic Healing and Spiritual Awakening, proudly ... Delgado, June 9--24, 2017. This sacred and spiritual journey during the Summer ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... they are now offering treatments for sleep apnea and TMJ at their office. ... Sleep apnea , specifically the obstructive type, is increasingly being treated at dental ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Viewers who like to educate themselves on current issues ... goods, services, and societal issues tend to appreciate and love the "Informed" series, hosted ... utilizing running events for causes around the world. , Running for charity ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... Judy ... Reiki™ Master in Frederick, MD. Judy says, “I am passionate about sharing Reiki ... often a very difficult and challenging time.” , A Certified Medical Reiki™ Master ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... “Vintage and Harvest A Cultivation ... and college Bible teacher residing in North Carolina with his wife, Anna Marie. He ... them with six grandchildren. David is also the author of “Shadow and Substance.” , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Microplate ... offering. ... separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada , ... , Latin America , and Rest of World. ... Also, a six-year historic analysis is provided for these markets. Market data ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... 23, 2017  HealthMine surveys with 9,250 insured consumers ... health plan members want help from their plans in ... in their health, 2) help closing gaps in care, ... health and 5) relevant, real-time guidance. Meeting these needs ... costs. A Reason to Stay ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... YORK and GENEVA , ... announced on World Tuberculosis Day revitalizes efforts to develop ... On World Tuberculosis Day, TB Alliance and ... for the clinical development of sutezolid, an antibiotic drug ... sublicense pertains to the development of sutezolid in combination ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: