Navigation Links
Potential for noninvasive brain tumor treatment
Date:6/16/2009

DURHAM, N.C. -- Duke University engineers have taken a first step toward a minimally invasive treatment of brain tumors by combining chemotherapy with heat administered from the end of a catheter.

The proof-of-concept study demonstrated that it should be technically possible to treat brain tumors without the side effects associated with the traditional approaches of surgery, systemic chemotherapy or radiation.

The bioengineers designed and built an ultrasound catheter that can fit into large blood vessels of the brain and perform two essential functions: provide real-time moving 3-D images and generate localized temperature increases. The researchers envision using this system in conjunction with chemotherapy drugs encased in heat-sensitive microbubbles called liposomes.

"Physicians would inject drug-carrying liposomes into a patient's bloodstream, and then insert a catheter via a blood vessel to the site of the brain tumor," said Carl Herickhoff, fourth-year graduate student at Duke's Pratt School of Engineering and first author of a paper appearing in the journal Ultrasonic Imaging. "The catheter would use ultrasound to first image the tumor, and then direct a higher-power beam to generate heat at the site, melting the liposome shells and releasing the chemotherapy directly to the tumor.

"The temperature increase would be about four degrees Celsius enough to melt the liposome, but not enough to damage surrounding tissue," Herickhoff said. "No one has tried this approach before in the brain."

The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 21,000 new brain tumor cases were diagnosed in 2008, with more than 13,000 patients dying. This represents about two percent of all cancer deaths.

The researchers said that a minimally invasive approach to treating this cancer would be preferable to the conventional methods, which have drawbacks and side effects of their own.

"Surgery is invasive, and chemotherapy that is injected or taken orally affects the whole body and has difficulty crossing the blood-brain barrier in sufficient concentrations," Herickhoff said. The blood-brain barrier restricts the passage into the brain of any foreign matter not needed by the neural tissue.

In a series of experiments in animal models and simulated tissues, the researchers demonstrated that they could build a catheter thin enough to be placed in one of the brain's main blood vessels that was capable of serving the dual purpose of visualization and heating.

"Taken as a whole, the results of these experiments, in particular the clarity of the images and ability to increase temperature with the same catheter, lead us to believe that the ultimate creation of a practical intracranial ultrasound catheter is possible," said Stephen Smith, director of the Duke University Ultrasound Transducer Group and senior member of the research team. "There are some design issues of the catheter itself that we feel can be overcome with little difficulty."

Advances in ultrasound technology have made these latest experiments possible, the researchers said, by generating detailed, 3-D moving images in real-time. The Duke laboratory has a long track record of modifying traditional 2-D ultrasound like that used to image babies in utero into the more advanced 3-D scans. After inventing the technique in 1991, the team also has shown its utility in developing specialized catheters and endoscopes for real-time imaging of tissues throughout the body.

Much of the liposome research was carried out at Duke by David Needham, professor of mechanical engineering and materials science, and Mark Dewhirst, professor of radiation oncology.


'/>"/>

Contact: Richard Merritt
richard.merritt@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. New data demonstrate potential for early detection of Alzheimers disease
2. Appetite-stimulating hormone is first potential medical treatment for frailty in older women
3. Quark Pharmaceuticals Announces the Presentation of Data Indicating Potential Utility of QPI-1002 in Chronic Kidney Disease at the RNA Interference Summit
4. Hispanic Workers Ages 50+ May Help Employers Solve Potential Future Labor Shortages
5. A potential drug for liver carcinoma
6. Deloitte Comparative Effectiveness Study Evaluates Potential Savings Opportunities for U.S. Health Care System
7. GlaxoSmithKline Travel Health: 55 percent of travellers needlessly put themselves at risk from a potentially fatal virus
8. Sodium channel blocker shows promise as a potential treatment for cystic fibrosis
9. Study Supports Swine Flus Pandemic Potential
10. Swine flu: Early findings about pandemic potential reported in new study
11. Mach One Corporation Announces Hand Carried Product as a Potential Solution to Swine Flu (H1N1) Virus
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Cosmetic Town, an online plastic surgery community, announces the relaunch ... recently revamped and upgraded to allow even more interaction between doctors and patients as ... According to the senior editor of Cosmetic Town, “We are excited that our ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Greener Hydroponics is now ... pots are frequently used by professional organic farmers and nurseries according to Sales Manager ... supply of fabric pots. Our goal is to offer wholesale level pricing and ultra-fast ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... In 2011, TIME magazine named Herr the ... of biomechatronics, technology that marries human physiology with electromechanics. He continues that work as ... the Founder of BionX , a leader in the field of prosthetic devices. ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... of enterprise Data Center Infrastructure Management solutions, announces today the availability of ... enhancements in the area of capacity management and optimization, providing new analytical ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... One way to ignore solid evidence is ... true. But we toss the baby out with the bathwater when we ignore all ... identifying higher-quality studies and otherwise making better use of education policy research. , “When ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... le 27 Avril 2016 ... progressé de +5% sur le trimestre, soutenu par ... consommables  Croissance de +16% des ventes ... Mauna Kea Technologies (Euronext : MKEA, FR0010609263 ; OTCQX : ... laser, annonce aujourd,hui son chiffre d,affaires pour le ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 Tie-up ... initiative to save newborns   ... women & newborns in collaboration with Breast Milk Foundation (BMF), ... first Pasteurized Human Milk Bank, ,Amaara, in Delhi-NCR today. This ... food source for infants and should be available to babies ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... FRANCISCO , April 27, 2016 ... reach over USD 2.14 billion by 2022, according ... Inc.       (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150105/723757 ... technological advancement affecting the efficiency and accuracy delivered ... the persistent demand for novel urinalysis instruments and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: