Navigation Links
Possible new approach to treating deadly leukemia in babies
Date:4/13/2011

MAYWOOD, Ill. -- A Loyola University Health System study points to a promising new approach to treating an aggressive and usually fatal leukemia in babies.

The study involved a type of leukemia called mixed lineage leukemia, or MLL. Only 25 to 50 percent of babies diagnosed with MLL leukemia survive the disease.

The study demonstrated how it may be possible to kill cancerous MLL cells by targeting a protein called DOT1. Researchers showed that, without the DOT1 protein, cancerous MLL cells died, said Charles Hemenway, MD, PhD, senior author of the study.

"We are focusing on the unique biology of MLL leukemia," Hemenway said.

The study was presented at the 2011 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Between 5 and 10 percent of all leukemias are MLL positive. In children older than 1 who have MLL leukemia, the survival rate is about 75 percent. By comparison, the survival rate for most other childhood leukemias is about 90 percent. Adults who have MLL leukemia also have lower survival rates than adults with other types of leukemia.

MLL is a subtype of leukemia caused by a mutation in a gene called MLL. The mutated gene codes for an abnormal MLL protein, which turns a blood cell into a cancer cell. For reasons researchers don't understand, MLL leukemia is more resistant to chemotherapy than other forms of leukemia.

In previous studies, Loyola researchers developed a small molecule, called PFWT, that binds to the MLL protein. This binding effectively disables the MLL protein, leading to the death of the cancer cell. Later this year, Hemenway plans to begin testing PFWT molecules on mice that have MLL leukemia.

The new study points to a second possible way to attack MLL cells, by targeting the DOT1 protein. DOT1 works in conjunction with the MLL protein. The study demonstrated that DOT1 is critical for keeping cancer MLL cancer cells alive.

Researchers cultured MLL cells from mice. From these cells, researchers removed the gene that codes for the DOT1 protein. Without the gene, the cell no longer produced the DOT1 protein, and without the DOT1 protein, the cancerous cells died.

Loyola researchers are collaborating with researchers from Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children to identify molecules that could disable DOT1.

Hemenway said a double-barrel approach -- targeting both the DOT1 and MLL proteins --potentially could be a more effective treatment than current chemotherapy, with fewer side effects. But it will take years of additional research and testing before such a treatment would be available for patients.

Hemenway said several other Loyola researchers are studying MLL leukemia. "There are a lot of opportunities for collaboration," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Digoxin may be a possible treatment for prostate cancer
2. Freezing Wrinkles a Possible Alternative to Botox
3. Remove childrens catheters as soon as possible to prevent bloodstream infections
4. FDA Panel Examines Possible Links Between Food Dyes, ADHD
5. Researchers find possible clues to tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients
6. A possible new target for treatment of multiple sclerosis
7. A safer, more effective morphine may be possible with Indiana University discovery
8. Scientists ID possible biomarker to gauge Alzheimers prognosis, effect of therapies
9. Researchers discover possible biomarker and therapeutic target for melanoma
10. Accurate measurement of radioactive thoron possible at last
11. Nature Reviews Cancer article traces possible role of damaged DNA in tumor development
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... The Muscular Dystrophy Association ... restaurants, launched the 14th annual “Appetite for a Cure” campaign on Feb. 1 ... ALS and related diseases that severely limit strength and mobility. , Now ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... organization devoted exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the lymphoma community ... is poised to once again host, Swirl, A Wine Tasting Event at the ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... Give To Cure today announced that it is working ... To Cure’s campaign that is crowdfunding clinical trials to help find cures faster for ... a smart device. In 2015 alone, Venmo processed $7.5 billion in transactions among users. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... ... Stuart Bentkover, MD, FACS is thrilled to announce the arrival ... tattoo removal today, Dr. Bentkover is the only doctor in Central Massachusetts to offer ... been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a safe and efficient ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... ... California Mobile Kitchens , a company that designs ... kitchen model, featuring customizable stainless steel interiors and a new, 26-foot unit. , ... in the U.S. Many of their units can be seen at sporting events, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... New York , February 5, 2016 ... new Transparency Market Research report states that the global ... in 2014 and is predicted to reach US$185.9 bn ... CAGR of 6.50% from 2014 to 2020. The title ... (Branded/Generic/Over-the-counter, Chemical/Biological, Captive/Contract Manufactured, by Geography, and by Therapeutic ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , February 5, 2016 ... new market research report "Fetal (Labor & Delivery) and ... Antepartum), Warmer, Incubator, Pulse Oximeter, Phototherapy/Jaundice Management Devices, CPAP, ... by MarketsandMarkets, This report studies the global market over ... is estimated at USD 6.28 Billion in 2015 and ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... France , Germany , ... Israel ). It includes a 10-year epidemiology forecast for the ... age and sex in these markets. GD epidemiology report is written and ... quality, transparent and market-driven, providing expert analysis of disease trends in the ... , Italy , Spain , UK, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: