Navigation Links
Poor Sleep Linked to High Blood Pressure in Teens

Similar results have been found in studies of adults

MONDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who don't get enough sleep or have poor-quality sleep run the risk of elevated blood pressure, a new study finds.

It's the first study to make such a connection, said study senior author Dr. Susan Redline, director of the University Hospitals Sleep Center at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.

"In adults, there has been evidence that less than six hours of sleep a night was associated with high blood pressure levels," said Redline, who is professor of medicine and pediatrics at Case Western Reserve. "No study has been done in adolescents."

Redline and her colleagues studied 238 boys and girls ages 13 to 16, asking about their sleep habits. They found that 11 percent of them slept less than 6.5 hours a night, and 26 percent had poor "sleep efficiency," with frequent awakenings at night.

One of every seven teens in the study had either hypertension, which is high blood pressure greater than 120 over 80, or borderline high blood pressure called prehypertension. Teens with less than 85 percent sleep efficiency had nearly three times the odds of high blood pressure, the researchers reported.

"That was one of the more unique findings, that poor sleep quality is associated with high blood pressure," Redline said.

The study was published in the Aug. 19 issue of the journal Circulation.

While it's too early to tell where poor sleep ranks among the risk factors for high blood pressure, Redline said, "In our study, it was stronger than being overweight."

The Case Western researchers will continue to follow the teenagers "to see how their blood pressure is developing over time," she said.

Dr. Stephen R. Daniels, pediatrician-in-chief at the Children's Hospital in Denver and a spokesman for the American Heart Association, noted that the new study is preliminary, but "it does point to the direction that the next studies need to go to understand what less sleep and less efficient sleep mean in terms of blood pressure."

If the findings hold up, they could eventually influence school system schedules, Daniels said. Schools now start later in the morning for younger students and earlier for teenagers, he said. "But the changes in the diurnal patterns for adolescents make it harder for them to get up in the morning and to get to sleep at night. If we reorganize the day-night schedule for adolescents, that could make life easier for them and their parents," he added.

Dr. Richard D. Simon Jr., medical director of the Kathryn Severyns Dement Sleep Disorders Center in Walla Walla, Wash., said the study findings make biological sense.

"We do know that in adults, poor sleep and a diminished amount of sleep are associated with obesity and hormone intolerance," Simon said. "Changes occur in the sympathetic nervous system. Also, fragmentary sleep activates inflammatory pathways."

All the experts agreed that better sleep for teens could be achieved by what Redline called "optimizing sleep hygiene, following regular sleep habits, turning the light off approximately the same time every night, keeping the bedroom quieter, and avoiding substances that may disturb sleep, such as caffeine."

"Kids as well as adults need to be allowed to sleep enough," Simon said. "We say eight hours of sleep a night, but it takes an hour to wind down. It's very, very hard to allow enough time to sleep."

More information

For tips on getting more and better sleep, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center.

SOURCES: Susan Redline, M.D., director, Case Western Reserve University Hospitals Sleep Center, Cleveland; Stephen R. Daniels, M.D., pediatrician-in-chief, the Children's Hospital, Denver; Richard D. Simon Jr., medical director, Kathryn Severyns Dement Sleep Disorders Center, Walla Walla, Wash.; Aug. 19, 2008, Circulation

Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. A therapy for baby boomers to sleep on
2. Study shows that surgical weight loss does not eliminate obstructive sleep apnea
3. Study shows that older adult caregivers of people with dementia have worse sleep than noncaregivers
4. Study finds that sleep selectively preserves emotional memories
5. Kids Who Sleep Poorly at Risk for Being Overweight
6. Sleep Apnea Boosts Death Risk
7. Sleep apnea linked to increased risk of death
8. Aging Hinders Memory Storage During Sleep
9. Searching for shut eye: Penn study identifies possible sleep gene
10. Findings on bladder-brain link may point to better treatments for problems in sleep, attention
11. Note to people with scarred and stiffened lungs: Monitor your sleep before severe fatigue sets in
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Poor Sleep Linked to High Blood Pressure in Teens
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 28, 2015 , ... There is only one major question facing all law ... , This question has not been an easy question to answer. Especially when the ... the younger workforce don’t share the same discipline around working long hours. , ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The rapid speed at which ... age, more care is needed, especially with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive conditions ... overworked. The forgotten part of this equation: 80 percent of medical care occurs ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Lizzie’s Lice Pickers just announced ... offering customers 10% off of their purchase of lice treatment product. In addition, customers ... According to a company spokesperson. “Finding lice is a sure way to ruin the ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Consistent ... sharing, the 2016 Building Better Radiology Marketing Programs meeting will showcase ... Sunday, March 6, 2016, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas with a pre-conference ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... online platform for mental health and wellness consultation, has collaborated with a leading ... bridge the knowledge gap experienced by parents and bring advice from parenting experts ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/27/2015)... ) ... "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier ... Segment Forecasts, Innovative Technologies, Instrumentation Review, Competitive ... offering. --> ) has ... Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier Shares ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 2015 Un nuevo enfoque combina ... el cáncer avanzado.   --> Un ... de Bremachlorin para el cáncer avanzado.   ... con la terapia fotodinámica de Bremachlorin para el cáncer ... --> Clinical Cancer Research . --> ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... A new combination approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy ... new combination approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy for ... new combination approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy for ... has found that immunotherapy can be efficiently ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: