Navigation Links
Poor More Likely to Die Following Heart Surgery

No matter what race or gender, poor people have higher death rates than rich within first decade

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Poor people are more likely to die within five to 10 years after heart surgery than more affluent people, U.S. researchers report.

They followed 15,156 white men, 6,932 white women, 678 black men and 564 black women who had heart bypass or valve surgery between 1995 and 2005 and found that the poorest patients were 19 to 26 percent more likely to die within five years of surgery than the wealthiest patients, regardless of race or gender.

"We were surprised that consistently and pervasively, through every way of looking at the data, it turns out this isn't about skin color or gender. It's about being poor," study author Colleen G. Koch, a cardiac anesthesiologist and vice chair for research and education in the department of cardiothoracic anesthesia at the Cleveland Clinic, said in a news release.

However, the researchers did find that poor patients were significantly more likely to be black and female.

Koch and colleagues also found that poorer patients had more atherosclerosis, serious cardiovascular disease, prior heart attacks, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, high blood pressure, prior stroke, peripheral artery disease, treated diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. They were also more likely to be smokers.

The study appears in the current issue of the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Poorer patients didn't have a significantly higher death rate while in hospital immediately after surgery. Factors such as financial problems, educational barriers, and lack of referrals to cardiac rehabilitation programs may contribute to increased risk of death among poor patients in the years after heart surgery, Koch said.

Their survival rates might increase through improved access to primary prevention, earlier identification of risk factors, better access to long-term interventions, and enrollment in cardiac rehab programs, Koch said. Cardiac rehab typically includes monitored exercise, nutritional counseling, emotional support, and education.

More information

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons explains what to expect after heart surgery.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 6, 2010

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Blacks Less Likely to Get Follow-Up Colon Screening
2. Breast cancer patients with BRCA mutations 4 times more likely to get cancer in opposite breast
3. Those Who Enjoy Life More Likely to Be Happy at Work
4. In Pregnancy, Leg Clots More Likely on Left Side
5. Minority women least likely to gain access to a doctor, study says
6. Mexican Americans less likely than whites to call 9-1-1 for stroke
7. Black Women Least Likely to Breast-Feed in U.S.
8. Patients Who Take a Proton-Pump Inhibitor With Medicine to Prevent Blood Clots Are Less Likely to Be Hospitalized for Bleeding Ulcers
9. Anti-obesity drugs unlikely to provide lasting benefit according to scientists
10. Older Colon Cancer Patients Less Likely to Get Chemo
11. Football Injuries More Likely on Certain Artificial Turf
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/26/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... Inevitably when ... Many customers choose to buy during the Black Friday and Cyber Monday ... don’t need to search the Internet high and low to find the best massage ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... American Express Travel Representative. As a franchise owner, Somu now offers travelers, value ... cruise, destination wedding packages, private cruise sales, as well as, cabin upgrades and ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... Omaha, NE (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... careers searched by healthcare professionals and offered by healthcare staffing agency Aureus Medical ... top during the month of October 2015 among those searching for healthcare jobs through ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... process, participated in the 61st annual Employee Benefits Conference. The Employee Benefits Conference ... Sunday, November 8th through Wednesday, November 11th, 2015. The conference was held at ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... mental health and wellness consultation, has collaborated with Women’s Web – an ... reader’s queries on topics on mental and emotional well-being relationship, life balance, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015 ... the "Global Brain Monitoring Devices Market ... --> ) has announced the ... Devices Market 2015-2019" report to their ... ( ) has announced the addition ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. , Nov. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... of a Biologics License Application (BLA) with ... Administration (FDA) for ABP 501, a biosimilar candidate to ... the first adalimumab biosimilar application submitted to the FDA ... biosimilar pathway. Sean E. Harper , M.D., ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... WOODBURY, N.Y. , Nov. 25, 2015  Linden ... access and optimizing treatment outcomes for patients suffering from ... its request for a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) enjoining ... between the two companies. --> ... aggressively pursuing all of its legal options. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: