Navigation Links
Poll Finds Sun Smarts Vary From City to City
Date:5/5/2010

Hartford gets top grade for skin cancer awareness; Pittsburgh fares worst

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- People in Hartford, Conn., Salt Lake City and Denver lead the nation in skin cancer prevention and detection awareness, while those in Cleveland, Chicago and Pittsburgh rank lowest, according to a new American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey.

The 26-city poll was released this week, to coincide with the launch of Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month in May.

More than 7,000 adults from across the United States took part in the online survey designed to assess participants' knowledge, attitudes and behaviors toward tanning, sun protection and skin cancer detection.

Hartford residents led the way in knowledge about sun protection and the risks associated with tanning. People in Salt Lake City, Denver and Hartford all scored better than the national average (76 percent) when they disagreed with the statement that they are not too concerned about skin cancer because it is easily detected and treated.

"While skin cancer can be successfully treated if detected early, the five-year survival rate for individuals with regional and distant stage melanoma are 65 percent and 16 percent, respectively. That's why people must be vigilant about protecting their skin from sun exposure and aware of the early warning signs of skin cancer," Dr. William D. James, president of the AAD, said in a news release.

Nationally, 59 percent of respondents said they had never been screened for skin cancer by a health care provider. In Hartford the rate was 48 percent, compared with 69 percent in Pittsburgh and 67 percent in Chicago.

The survey also found that 81 percent of Pittsburgh respondents said they thought people look more attractive with a tan, compared with 72 percent of the general public.

"We're hoping the results of this survey will draw attention to the public's need to change its attitudes toward tanning, which is the first step in changing behavior," James said. "Our data show that most people are concerned about skin cancer, but they still need to modify their attitudes, behavior and knowledge to reduce their risk."

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about sun safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Dermatology, news release, May 3, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Men With HPV at Higher Risk for HIV, Study Finds
2. Study finds cutting colonoscopy preparation from 2 days to 1 day just as effective
3. Study finds key protein controls T-cell proliferation
4. Pay-for-performance programs may worsen medical disparities, study finds
5. Young Physicians Taught to Practice Defensive Medicine, Survey Finds
6. Survey Finds Broad Support for Alcohol Regulations to Keep the Public Safe
7. Fibromyalgia affects mental health of those diagnosed and their spouses, study finds
8. Cell study finds receptor can fight tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells
9. Study finds that drugs used for treatment of influenza in pregnancy appear to be safe
10. Immune cells predict success of head and neck cancer treatment, U-M study finds
11. SGIC Study Finds Drivers Are Losing Their Cool At School
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/7/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... insurance and financial consultation services to residents in the Sacramento/Folsom region, is initiating ... Chance treatment facility. , The Another Choice Another Chance treatment center in Sacramento ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... , ... AlignLife clinics nationwide are giving back to their communities by collecting ... bountiful gifts wrapped tightly under a Christmas Tree. AlignLife hopes to spread the ... , In exchange for generous donations, customers will receive a gift in return. ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... ... Sharon Kleyne, host of the nationally syndicated radio program, The Sharon Kleyne ... declared on her radio program in November 2016 the need to educate people about ... leaders in corporate America, they are trying to take advantage of successful algorithms and ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... , ... December 07, 2016 , ... Delete® - Tattoo ... Time For The Holiday Party Season. Save Up To 33% Off Botox® and Juvederm® ... is providing the Phoenix Valley with Delightful Deals on Botox® and Juvederm® ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... Studio City, CA (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... number during the holidays and winter seasons. One major study analyzing heart attacks ... January compared to August of a given year. We would all agree of course–no ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/6/2016)... -- Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma - Pipeline Review, H2 2016 ... and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma – ... the Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma (Oncology) pipeline landscape. Anaplastic ... two types of cells in the brain, called ... form a mass. These brain cells are known ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... YORK , Dec. 6, 2016  Nearly 30 ... suffer from the epidemic of diabetes. 1 ... have persistently elevated glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and significant glucose variability. ... developing serious complications, including cardiovascular events. If left untreated, ... damage and eye disease or blindness. 3 ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... Dec. 6, 2016  Arcturus Therapeutics, Inc. ("Arcturus" ... announced today that it entered into collaboration with ... for the treatment of NASH and other gastrointestinal ... platform LUNAR™ and UNA Oligomer chemistry. The financial ... long-standing commitment to and expertise in GI disorders, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: