Navigation Links
Pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons may be a viable Parkinson's disease treatment
Date:6/28/2013

Putnam Valley, NY. (Jun. 28 2013) A team of researchers from Rush University, Yale University, the University of Colorado and the St. Kitts Biomedical Research Foundation transplanted human embryonic stem cells into primate laboratory animals modeled with Parkinson's disease and found "robust survival" of the cells after six weeks and indications that the cells were "well integrated" into the host animals. The study appears as an early e-publication for the journal Cell Transplantation, and is now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/pre-prints/ct1000wakeman.

"Parkinson's disease was one of the first neurological disorders to be studied for potential replacement of lost neurons," said Dr. D. Eugene Redmond of Yale University School of Medicine. "Since the 1970s there has been significant progress with learning the required gene expression, growth factors and culture conditions for differentiating cells into apparent dopamine neurons."

However, the researchers noted that transplanted dopamine neurons have not produced "long-lasting midbrain specific neurons when transplanted into rodents or monkeys" and there have only been pilot reports of functional improvement.

According to the study authors, their study tested the long-term survival and functional benefit of apparent dopamine neurons in monkeys modeled with Parkinson's disease. As with other studies, their results found that the gene expression of the rate limiting synthetic enzyme for dopamine production, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), was "transient" after transplantation, raising questions about the optimal cell stage and culture environment that favor graft survival and the factors that could impact cell transplantation. Once more, a more robust immunosuppression regimen than employed in other primate studies resulted in better cell survival.

"Our results demonstrate that pluripotent stem cell line-derived neurons retain the capacity to robustly survive and respond to cues in the primate brain," they wrote. "The absence of TH expression indicates that other methods may be necessary to produce and maintain the proper midbrain dopaminergic form of the cells in vivo."

While their study demonstrated robust survival of the cells, the researchers said that longer term studies are required to better understand what factors may impact long-term function replacement and whether they demonstrate significant reversal of parkinsonism, tumor formation or dyskinesias, the latter being a side effect of current treatments for Parkinson's Disease.


'/>"/>

Contact: Robert Miranda
cogcomm@aol.com
Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Industry (iPSC Market) Report Updated for 2013 Now Available at ReportsnReports.com
2. Scientists at UMass Medical School identify neurons that control feeding behavior in Drosophila
3. Researchers identify networks of neurons in the brain that are disrupted in psychiatric disease
4. Tiny worm sheds light on giant mystery about neurons
5. Stanford researchers turn skin cells directly into the cells that insulate neurons
6. Fatheads: How neurons protect themselves against excess fat
7. Difficulty in recognizing faces in autism linked to performance in a group of neurons
8. Improper protein digestion in neurons identified as a cause of familial Parkinsons
9. Protein build-up leads to neurons misfiring
10. Neurons derived from cord blood cells may represent new therapeutic option
11. Neurons that control overeating also drive appetite for cocaine
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... Ellevate Network, the leading network for professional women, brought together some of ... their inaugural Summit in New York City in June. The event was livestreamed with ... 3 million. To watch the Mobilize Women video, click here . , ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Coveros, a leader in agile ... a contract by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The Enterprise ... use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and high value manner across CMS ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... now treating sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many ... sleep disorder characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) ... FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s ... Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... , ... HMP , a leader in healthcare events and education, today announced ... Award for ‘Best B-to-B Healthcare Website.’ Winners were announced during the Eddie & Ozzie ... competition recognizes editorial and design excellence across a range of sectors. This year’s program ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/25/2017)... , Sept. 25, 2017   Montrium ... Master File solutions, today—from the IQPC Trial Master ... , NL)—announced that EastHORN Clinical Services has ... clinical programs and TMF management. EastHORN, a leading ... eTMF platform to increase transparency to enable greater ...
(Date:9/23/2017)... -- Janssen Biotech, Inc. (Janssen) announced today that it ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the Biologics License ... of moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The ... to further evaluate the safety of sirukumab in the ... "We are disappointed by ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... , Sept. 22, 2017 AVACEN Medical ... device is now successfully helping those with the widespread ... Fibromyalgia diagnosed Amanda in Essex, England ... and washing my hair, experiencing no sleep at all, ... painful spasm… I cannot recommend [the AVACEN 100] enough, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: