Navigation Links
Plastic surgeons should be part of disaster relief planning, response
Date:9/10/2009

DALLAS Sept. 10, 2009 When a terrorist bomb explodes, a tornado rips through a town, a hurricane devastates a region, or wildfires ravage homes and businesses, plastic surgeons are not typically atop the list of emergency responders.

But they should be, UT Southwestern Medical Center plastic surgeons and disaster experts recommend in the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Including plastic surgeons in disaster-relief efforts could improve long-term outcomes for victims of catastrophes, particularly in medical cases that might involve physical scarring and nerve damage, but which can be made worse by lack of quick attention.

"Plastic surgeons are often being overlooked in disaster-planning efforts, particularly in developing medical-team responders," said Dr. Rod Rohrich, chairman of plastic surgery at UT Southwestern and the study's senior author. "Plastic surgeons, particularly those based at academic medical centers and/or major trauma centers, are far more engaged in complex reconstruction procedures on a day-to-day basis than cosmetic surgeons. We are intimately involved in preventing and treating face and tissue scarring, treating burns, and handling sensitive nerve-related injuries, some of which can be best served by having plastic surgeons on the scene or at least near the front lines where disaster victims are being evacuated."

Examining the on-site evidence of several disasters, the authors identified four pivotal areas in trauma care where plastic surgeons have added expertise:

  • soft tissue trauma;
  • upper and lower extremity trauma;
  • facial trauma; and
  • burn management.

The authors suggest that plastic surgeons should be among those who help plan for medical responses prior to disasters, as well part of the responders working in conjunction with traditional surgical responders, such as trauma and orthopaedic surgeons.

The authors examined responses reported in disaster events ranging from devastating earthquakes in Turkey and the London Underground bombings to the Sept. 11 attacks on the East Coast and found a substantial volume of overall cases involving plastic surgery-related issues.

In the case of the London bombings in 2005, facial fractures affected 18 percent of patients. In the Turkey earthquake in 1999, more than 13 percent of hospital beds were occupied by patients needing plastic surgery. In New York City, only 26 percent of burn victims were correctly triaged first to a burn center, despite there being an adequate number of dedicated burn beds in the area.

"Not only should such expert plastic surgeons become part of the disaster preparation team and actual response to applicable incidents, but their training curricula should now also include formal courses in disaster life support and incident command system management," said Dr. Paul Pepe, chief of emergency medicine at UT Southwestern and an international expert in disaster management. "In essence, both disaster managers and plastic surgery program directors need to foster the contributions of this previously overlooked resource for dealing with catastrophic events."

Soft tissue injuries, for example, are the most common acute injury from casualties resulting from a blast or explosion and can be treated by other specialties, according to the article. Early intervention by plastic surgeons, however, could help avert problems such as long-term scarring or wound healing and closure, and could be more cost effective.

"Plastic surgeons routinely deal with facial healing, facial fractures, tissue damage and related territory, making access to the expertise of a plastic surgeon invaluable," Dr. Rohrich said.

Plastic surgeons also bring expertise in tissue viability, amputation and microcirculation issues that can affect whether limbs are preserved, the authors said. Similarly, plastic surgeons have routine experience with burn care that could be invaluable in the case of radiation, biological or fire disasters, as well as help in triaging patients. While other surgical specialists have degrees of expertise in such areas, having direct access to plastic surgeons would be an important asset to disaster medical relief teams.

"As many disciplines gather together to partner in disaster response and preparation, the plastic surgeons should be seen as pivotal members, let alone additional assets, for the medical casualty care team," the study's authors concluded.


'/>"/>

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. My1Stop.com Offers Plastic Card Printing Promotion Beats the Thirty Cents per Card Threshold - Offering 1000 Cards in Only Three Days for $299
2. PlastiPure and Hydrapak Take First Safer Plastic Water Bottle to Market
3. Dermal Filler Procedures Jump 30% at Center For Cosmetic and Plastic Surgery
4. American Institute for Plastic Surgery is Using Artefill to Fight Patient Wrinkles
5. Top Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon Appointed President of Orange County Society of Plastic Surgeons
6. Reinterpretation of proximal colon polyps called hyperplastic in 2001
7. Consumers Research Council of America Names Plastic Surgeon Oleh S. Slupchynskyj, M.D. as One of Americas Top Surgeons for the Second Time
8. Dr. Jack P. Gunter Offers 3D Imaging for Dallas, Texas Plastic Surgery Patients
9. Susies Big Adventure Explores Plastic Surgery In Saudi Arabia
10. Atlanta Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon Thomas Lintner, MD Renewing Bodies and Spirits for New Moms with a Mommy Makeover
11. Dysport proves safe, effective anti-wrinkle treatment, UT Southwestern plastic surgeons find
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Plastic surgeons should be part of disaster relief planning, response
(Date:5/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 25, 2016 , ... ... Institute (WCRI) compare outcomes of injured workers across 15 states. The outcomes ... work, earnings recovery, access to medical care, and satisfaction with medical care. , ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... ... - “Advancing Drug Development through Molecular Imaging.” The focus of ADDMI-IG will be ... drug discovery and development pipeline issues. Through ADDMI-IG WMIS will provide a platform ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , ... May 25, 2016 , ... ... to industries ranging from medical and pharmaceutical, to food and HVAC facilities. Their ... as on-site training. , For medical applications, Afrimesure offers a variety of ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... The University of San Francisco (USF) has named ... lead a team of more than 100 full-time faculty and staff, and serve as ... in late August. , Baker comes to USF from the University of Washington in ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 25, 2016 , ... "FCPX ... the quality of your footage," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... editors can quickly and easily add stylish color grades to their footage. A LUT ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... LAWRENCE, Mass. , May 24, 2016  NxStage ... medical technology company focused on advancing renal care, today ... Officer, plans to participate in the following schedule of ... will be made available at http://ir.nxstage.com/ . ... Jefferies Healthcare Conference NY, NY           Friday, ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 ... ™ , la première endoprothèse ... cathéters destinés à l,intervention portant sur les ...   OrbusNeich, entreprise mondiale spécialisée ... de changer la vie, a élargi son ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... India , May 23, 2016 ... spread across 163 pages, profiles 12 companies and the ... tables and figures on the industry and its players. ... that is comprehensive in nature, details the current state ... the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: