Navigation Links
Place, not race, may be a larger determinant of health disparities
Date:10/6/2011

Where you live could play a larger role in health disparities than originally thought, according to a new study by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. They examined a racially integrated, low-income neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland and found that, with the exception of smoking, nationally reported disparities in hypertension, diabetes, obesity among women and use of health services disappeared or narrowed. The results are featured in the October 2011 issue of Health Affairs.

"Most of the current health disparities literature fails to account for the fact that the nation is largely segregated, leaving racial groups exposed to different health risks and with variable access to health services based on where they live," said Thomas LaVeist, PhD, lead author of the study, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, and the William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Policy and Management. "By comparing black and white Americans who are exposed to the same set of socioeconomic, social and environmental conditions we were better equipped to discern the impact of race on health-related outcomes and have concluded social factors are essentially equalized when racial disparities are minimized."

LaVeist and colleagues identified communities in the U.S. containing a population of at least 35 percent African American and 35 percent white residents, and where the African Americans and white residents have similar income and education. Two communities in Baltimore were selected as study sites and in-person interviews were conducted with adult residents. Blood pressure was also measured among a number of study participants. Researchers used data from the National Health Interview Survey to compare national and study-site data on obesity, smoking and diabetes. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to compare national and study-site data on hypertension. Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was used to compare the use of health services nationally and in the study area. Researchers concluded that racial differences in social environments explained a significant portion of disparities typically found in national data.

"When whites are exposed to the health risks of an urban environment their health status is compromised similarly to that of blacks, who more commonly live in such communities," said Darrell Gaskin, PhD, co-author of the study, deputy director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and an associate professor with the Bloomberg School's Department of Health Policy and Management. "Policies aimed solely at health behavior change, biological differences among racial groups, or increased access to health care are limited in their ability to close racial disparities in health. A more effective policy approach would be to address the differing resources of neighborhoods and improve the underlying conditions of health for all."


'/>"/>

Contact: Natalie Wood-Wright
nwoodwri@jhsph.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. With Safety Devices in Place, Kids Injuries Decline: Study
2. Study shows race, not experience, impacts hiring in sports world
3. Study finds race, ethnicity impact access to care for children with frequent ear infections
4. Race, Income Affect Care for Ear Infections: Study
5. Race, Gender Play Part in Hypertension Risk
6. Race, Sex Play Part in Hypertension Risk
7. Sex, race, and geography influence health outcomes following primary HIV infection
8. Self-Esteem Levels Vary by Age, Race, Study Finds
9. New clues found linking larger animals to colder climates
10. Fewer Deaths in Larger, Busier Hospitals
11. UniqueU Medical Weight Loss Success Requires an Expansion and Move to a Larger Location
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... Software Development, has been awarded a contract by the Center for Medicare and ... aims to accelerate the enterprise use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... On The Brink”: the Christian history of the United States and the loss of ... William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, Millie, have six children, ten grandchildren, ... Navy. Following his career as a naval aviator and carrier pilot, he spent ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... are now treating sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As ... serious sleep disorder characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... The company has developed ... consumer and regulatory authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula has ... highest standard. , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, Soy ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... The American College of Medical Informatics ... PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s ... of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)... Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ) will ... 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. Lilly will also ... investment community and media to further detail the company,s ... at 9 a.m. Eastern time. Investors, media and the ... conference call through a link that will be posted ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Oct. 2, 2017 The Rebound mobile app is ... to reverse the tide of prescription drug addiction. The app ... medicine intake and stepping down their dosage in a safe, ... in December 2017; the first 100,000 people to sign up ... http://www.rebound-solution.com/ ...
(Date:9/27/2017)... -- Commended for their devotion to personalized service, SMP Pharmacy Solutions ... in the South Florida Business Journal,s 50 Fastest-Growing Companies, and ... the national specialty pharmacy has found its niche.  To that ... be honored by SFBJ as the 2017 Power Leader in ... receive his award in October, Bardisa said of the three ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: