Navigation Links
Place, not race, may be a larger determinant of health disparities
Date:10/6/2011

Where you live could play a larger role in health disparities than originally thought, according to a new study by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. They examined a racially integrated, low-income neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland and found that, with the exception of smoking, nationally reported disparities in hypertension, diabetes, obesity among women and use of health services disappeared or narrowed. The results are featured in the October 2011 issue of Health Affairs.

"Most of the current health disparities literature fails to account for the fact that the nation is largely segregated, leaving racial groups exposed to different health risks and with variable access to health services based on where they live," said Thomas LaVeist, PhD, lead author of the study, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, and the William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Policy and Management. "By comparing black and white Americans who are exposed to the same set of socioeconomic, social and environmental conditions we were better equipped to discern the impact of race on health-related outcomes and have concluded social factors are essentially equalized when racial disparities are minimized."

LaVeist and colleagues identified communities in the U.S. containing a population of at least 35 percent African American and 35 percent white residents, and where the African Americans and white residents have similar income and education. Two communities in Baltimore were selected as study sites and in-person interviews were conducted with adult residents. Blood pressure was also measured among a number of study participants. Researchers used data from the National Health Interview Survey to compare national and study-site data on obesity, smoking and diabetes. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to compare national and study-site data on hypertension. Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was used to compare the use of health services nationally and in the study area. Researchers concluded that racial differences in social environments explained a significant portion of disparities typically found in national data.

"When whites are exposed to the health risks of an urban environment their health status is compromised similarly to that of blacks, who more commonly live in such communities," said Darrell Gaskin, PhD, co-author of the study, deputy director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and an associate professor with the Bloomberg School's Department of Health Policy and Management. "Policies aimed solely at health behavior change, biological differences among racial groups, or increased access to health care are limited in their ability to close racial disparities in health. A more effective policy approach would be to address the differing resources of neighborhoods and improve the underlying conditions of health for all."


'/>"/>

Contact: Natalie Wood-Wright
nwoodwri@jhsph.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. With Safety Devices in Place, Kids Injuries Decline: Study
2. Study shows race, not experience, impacts hiring in sports world
3. Study finds race, ethnicity impact access to care for children with frequent ear infections
4. Race, Income Affect Care for Ear Infections: Study
5. Race, Gender Play Part in Hypertension Risk
6. Race, Sex Play Part in Hypertension Risk
7. Sex, race, and geography influence health outcomes following primary HIV infection
8. Self-Esteem Levels Vary by Age, Race, Study Finds
9. New clues found linking larger animals to colder climates
10. Fewer Deaths in Larger, Busier Hospitals
11. UniqueU Medical Weight Loss Success Requires an Expansion and Move to a Larger Location
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... OCTOBER XX, 2016 (PRWEB) (PRWEB) December 07, 2016 , ... ... new study entitled “Canine Filamentous Dermatitis Associated with Borrelia Infection” ... The study was published in the prestigious Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Facial plastic surgeon, Dr. ... season by donating a portion of proceeds to two local organizations: North Chicago Animal ... Control & Friends is a team of authorized and trained volunteers who support ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... Top 20 Marketing Campaign Winner in the Folio: Marketing Awards competition. Live From ... the year’s best in pioneering, inventive, and ultimately successful projects undertaken by the ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... BOC Business Brilliance Awards under the Best New Product Launch category. Gensuite’s entry ... through user experience. , BOC Global Events & Training Group is a professional ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... “The Road To Restoration”: an informative and ... one hour a week showing of hands. “The Road To Restoration” is the creation ... are familiar with the brass ring that you could reach out for, and grab, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/7/2016)... , Dec. 7,2016  Based on its ... industry, Frost & Sullivan recognizes Nemaura Pharma ... Sullivan Award for Enabling Technology Leadership. Nemaura ... loopholes in traditional drug delivery technologies, especially ... microneedle-based drug delivery technologies, Memspatch and Micropatch ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... , Dec. 7, 2016  Lannett Company, Inc. (NYSE: ... BMO Capital Markets 2016 Prescription for Success Healthcare Conference on December ... in New York City . In ... at the Guggenheim Securities 4 th Annual Boston Healthcare Conference ... ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... -- Radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes having an unstable balance ... nuclear research reactor or by using cyclotron. These isotopes ... gamma when changed to a stable nature. The gamma ... in medical diagnostics. In this field, the radiation is ... functioning. Radiotherapy is also used to treat some life-threatening ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: