Navigation Links
Pitt team finds way to classify post-cardiac arrest patients to better predict outcomes
Date:7/11/2011

PITTSBURGH, July 11 A new method for scoring the severity of illness for patients after cardiac arrest may help to predict their outcomes, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Most importantly, their findings, published in the early online version of Resuscitation, also show that none of the severity categories rules out the potential for a patient's recovery.

"Traditionally, we have used historical or event-related information, such as initial cardiac rhythm or whether someone witnessed the collapse, to categorize these patients upon arrival at the hospital," said Jon C. Rittenberger, M.D., lead author and assistant professor of emergency medicine. "Unfortunately, more than 10 percent of the time, such information is unavailable, which limits our ability to tailor therapies, counsel families about prognosis or select patients for clinical trials."

Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America, resulting in approximately 350,000 deaths each year.

The researchers looked at retrospective data for more than 450 post-cardiac arrest patients treated at UPMC Presbyterian between January 2005 and December 2009. Both in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were included. In 2007, the hospital implemented a multi-disciplinary post-cardiac arrest care plan, including therapeutic hypothermia, or cooling of patients to minimize brain damage.

Four distinct categories of illness severity were identified based on a combination of neurological and cardiopulmonary dysfunction during the first few hours after restoration of a patient's spontaneous circulation. The researchers looked at rates of survival, neurologic outcomes and development of multiple organ failure for patients in each category, and found wide variations among the groups.

"Now, objective data available to the clinician at the bedside during initial evaluation may provide a better way of predicting outcomes and guiding the decisions of families and clinicians. We found that the category of illness severity had a stronger association with survival and good outcomes than did such historically used factors as initial rhythm of arrest or where it happened," said Dr. Rittenberger. "Our results indicate that illness severity should be carefully measured and accounted for in future studies of therapies for these patients."


'/>"/>

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
2. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
3. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
4. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
5. New American Heart Association Survey Finds Heart Disease and Stroke Patients Face Significant Barriers in Obtaining Quality, Affordable Care
6. Survey Finds Many Men Complaining of Ill-Fitting Condoms
7. Research finds hazards from secondhand smoke in bars and restaurants
8. Kaiser Analysis Finds Record Medicaid Enrollment Growth in 2009
9. Battlefield camaraderie yields long-term dividends for veterans, study finds
10. More Bars Equals More Assaults, Study Finds
11. Survey finds significant racial differences in lung cancer beliefs
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Young ... offers services to communities throughout the greater Pittsburgh metropolitan region, is joining forces ... provide adaptive bicycles for differently-abled children. , Variety the Children’s Charity is a ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... ... The adage “Show, don’t tell” applies perfectly to Green Builder Media’s Earth ... House demonstration project series. Manifesting the concept of right-sized living, the Flex House is ... affordably and abundantly without unduly taxing the resources of our beautiful planet. ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... Agency of Record (AOR) for Theravent, Inc. , the makers of a ... company, Foundation Consumer Healthcare, is now working to expand distribution in anticipation of ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... 21, 2017 , ... Crossover Symmetry , an evidence ... active lifestyle company that provides Human Performance Training and education to tactical athletes. ... responders, military officers and others in service through the development and conditioning of ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... Kelowna, British Columbia (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... focused at treating people who wish to overcome their mental health struggles. The Alive ... Clinical Director Vic LeBouthillier says: “Our approach in dealing with a mental health struggle ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... , April 20, 2017  Vivify Health, the pioneer ... has been awarded a very significant patent for the ... to continual care via digital health.  This landmark patent ... property and further secures Vivify,s position as the leader ... 2009, was the first company to apply consumer mobile ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has ... and Market Prospects: Addressing Production Complexities Through Risk Management ... ... Biosimilar Pipeline and Market Prospects: Overcoming Production Complexities Through ... assessment of the current trends in the global biosimilars ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... Rapidly Expanding Injectables Market and Increasing Usage of Complex Biologics during ... ... rise from USD 20 Billion in 2015 to around USD 26 ... - Innovation Driven by Rapidly Expanding Injectables Market and Increasing Usage ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: