Navigation Links
Physicians order costly, redundant neuroimaging for stroke patients, study says
Date:3/5/2012

Neuroimaging for stroke patients may be unnecessarily costly and redundant, contributing to rising costs nationwide for stroke care, according to University of Michigan research.

The research, published in the Annals of Neurology, found that 95 percent of stroke patients who received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also had a computed tomography (CT) scan.

"Compared to CT, MRI is a more accurate test for stroke," says James F. Burke, M.D., lead author of the study and a clinical lecturer in the University of Michigan Medical School's Department of Neurology. "But our results showed that MRI is not replacing CT as the primary stroke neuroimaging study instead, patients are getting both.

"Minimizing the use of multiple studies could be a viable strategy to reduce costs."

The costs of inpatient stroke care have climbed by 42 percent between 1997 and 2007, an increase of $3,800 per case, Burke and his University of Michigan found. Neuroimaging MRIs and CTs were the largest driver of costs.

Diagnostic imaging has been the fastest growing component of total hospital costs, increasing 213 percent from 1999 to 2007.

"The data shows that neuroimaging practices in stroke are neither standardized or efficient," Burke says. "This represents an area where we have an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of care without adversely effecting the quality of care."

Burke's research spurred an accompanying editorial in the Annals, written by editors S. Clairborne Johnson, M.D., Ph.D. and Stephen L. Hauser, M.D.

"The issue of duplicative imaging in stroke is just one example of wasteful care," the editors wrote. "Quite simply, it is very easy to order more test and to treat with more expensive therapies

"We should track waste as another measure of quality care The failure to find a political solution to rising healthcare costs only increases our responsibility to become leaders and not victims."

Burke and his co-authors studied patients diagnosed with stroke from 1999 to 2008 in 11 states, studying 624,842 patients. They found wide geographic variation for the use of MRI, but overall the use of MRI jumped dramatically.

"There currently is not evidence-based guidelines that preferentially recommend either MRIs or CT," Burke says. "Understanding trends like these presented in this study are essential to determining efficient and consistent neuroimaging strategies."


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary F. Masson
mfmasson@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. American College of Physicians, CECity launch new quality improvement technology platform
2. Emergency medicine physicians develop device to stop lethal bleeding in soldiers
3. ACR in Choosing Wisely campaign to promote wise use of resources among physicians and patients
4. Independence Blue Cross teams with American College of Physicians to improve primary care
5. Paying physicians more to get more -- or to get less
6. Diagnostic physicians at increased risk for medical malpractice claims due to communication failures
7. Physicians who play Mozart while performing colonoscopy may improve adenoma detection rate
8. Mayo Clinic study guides physicians using therapeutic cooling to treat cardiac arrest patients
9. Physicians treating Latinos have high hurdles to jump, study shows
10. Most cancer physicians reach out to bereaved family, caregivers
11. Cedars-Sinai scientists, physicians to be key presenters at World Stem Cell Summit
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/28/2016)... ... ... In a part of the city where’s it’s easy to spot the neon lights of ... hoping to attract diners with a taste for real food. , On May 13, ... Cornerstone Grill, an urban casual restaurant focusing on dishes made by hand with wholesome, organic ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... W.S. Badger Co. Inc ., ... it has been recognized as one of the best small businesses for new dads ... one of nine small businesses providing progressive benefits to new parents on the organization’s ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... An educational campaign aimed at everyone ... courtesy of awareness-driven celebrities and thought leaders. It also provides insight to the ... leaders such as Bioness. , As patients feel increasingly concerned about the ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed at nurses and ... stories, which come courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health care industry. It ... advocates and associations—namely Abilene Christian University. , As the nursing industry is coming ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... There are many ways ... and Sausage Council (NHDSC) suggests that Americans prefer their dogs straight off the grill. ... say grilling is their favorite way to cook a hot dog, far outpacing other ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/26/2016)... NASHVILLE, Tenn. , May 26, 2016 ... provider of software and analytics, network solutions ... healthcare, today announced it entered into a ... leading provider of outpatient software solutions and ... surgery centers, specialty hospitals and rehabilitation clinics ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... and GERMANTOWN, Maryland , May 25, 2016 ... ; Frankfurt Prime Standard: QIA) today announced that the company ... Diagnostics GmbH to develop and commercialize predictive assays in oncology. ... as a marker to predict effectiveness of anthracycline treatment in ... "We are pleased to partner with Therawis, which developed the ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , May 25, 2016  Granger Diagnostics today ... test for wounds and infections. This test ensures ... and select viruses. The test requires only a ... David G. Bostwick , MD, ... to facilitate wound healing: "We are excited to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: