Navigation Links
Physicians Want to Learn From Medical Mistakes But Say Current Error-Reporting Systems are Inadequate
Date:1/9/2008

ROCKVILLE, Md., Jan. 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The perception that U.S. doctors are unwilling to report medical errors and learn how to prevent them is untrue, according to a new study funded by HHS' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Because most doctors think that current systems to report and share information about errors are inadequate, they rely instead on informal discussions with their colleagues. Consequently, important information about medical errors and how to prevent them often is not shared with the hospital or the health care organization, according to the study, which appears in the January/February issue of Health Affairs. As a result, such information is not aggregated for analysis and systematic improvement.

"These findings shed light on an important question - how to create error-reporting programs that will encourage clinician participation," said AHRQ Director Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D. "Physicians say they want to learn from errors that take place in their institution to improve patient safety. We need to build on that willingness with error-reporting programs that encourage their participation."

To assess physicians' attitudes about communicating errors with their colleagues and health care organizations, the study authors used a 68-question survey to poll a geographically diverse group of more than 1,000 physicians and surgeons currently practicing in rural and urban areas in Missouri and Washington State. The survey was conducted between July 2003 and March 2004.

Doctors were asked about their attitudes toward and experience with communicating about errors with both their health care organizations and their colleagues. Most physicians reported that they had been involved in an error -- 56 percent reported a prior involvement with a serious error, 74 percent with a minor error and 66 percent with a near miss. More than half (54 percent) agreed with the statement that "medical errors are usually caused by failures of care delivery systems, not failures of individuals."

The majority of physicians agreed that they should report errors to their hospital or health care organization to improve patient safety. Almost all (95 percent) physicians agreed that they needed to know about errors in their organization to improve patient safety, and 89 percent agreed that they should discuss errors with their colleagues.

Eighty-three percent said they had used at least one formal reporting mechanism, most commonly reporting an error to risk management (68 percent) or completing an incident report (60 percent). Few physicians believed that they had access to a reporting system that was designed to improve patient safety, and nearly half (45 percent) did not know if one existed at their organization.

Most physicians (61 percent) had used at least one informal mechanism to report an error to their hospital or health care organization, most commonly telling a supervisor or manager (40 percent) or physician chief or departmental chairman (38 percent). Physicians were more likely to discuss serious errors, minor errors and near misses with their colleagues than to report them to a risk management or to a patient safety official.

Only 30 percent agreed that current systems to report patient safety events were adequate. When asked what would increase their willingness to formally report error information, physicians said they wanted: 1) information to be kept confidential and non-discoverable (88 percent); 2) evidence that such information would be used for system improvements (85 percent) and not for punitive action (84 percent); 3) the error-reporting process to take less than 2 minutes (66 percent); and 4) the review activities to be confined to their department (53 percent).

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is currently developing proposed regulations to implement the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (the Patient Safety Act). The Patient Safety Act authorizes the creation of new entities called Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs) that will collect, aggregate and analyze confidential information voluntarily reported by health care providers; such information is generally confidential and privileged in accordance with the Patient Safety Act. PSOs will use this information to identify systemic and avoidable causes of risk in medical settings and to provide feedback to health care providers about successful approaches that reduce such risk and thereby improve patient safety and quality.


'/>"/>
SOURCE Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Broad-based group of physicians calls for improvement in stroke treatment
2. Latest DES Analysis Stresses Importance of Physicians Well-Trained in Implantation Technique and Patient Follow-Up
3. Psychiatrists are the least religious of all physicians
4. Maimonides Expands Circulation of Physicians Practice Journal to Staten Island Doctors
5. Scientists, physicians present latest findings in personalized cancer treatment and prevention
6. NNN Healthcare/Office REIT Acquires St. Mary Physicians Center in Long Beach, California
7. U.S. Physicians Question Presidential Candidates
8. New Jersey Physicians Launch New, Statewide Association to Fight for Stronger Voice in Healthcare
9. Internal medicine physicians recommend key elements to guide state initiatives
10. Fingertip Formulary Mobile(TM) is Now Available for Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers Free on PDAs
11. American College of Physicians publishes The Fenway Guide to LGBT Health
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Pulmonary Hypertension Association ... it will receive two significant new grants to support its work to advance ... 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for their work in ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® of San ... Society and the Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to and from ... adults to ensure the highest quality of life and ongoing independence. Getting to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... EB ... Decision Making in Emergency Medicine conference in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL. The awards ... in Emergency Medicine Practice and Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice. , “With ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Strategic Capital Partners, ... economy by obtaining investment capital for emerging technology companies. SCP has delivered ... already resulted in more than a million dollars of capital investment for five ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Today, MTI-GlobalStem, a provider of optimized transfection ... to transfect cells, announces its launch of the PluriQ™ G9™ Gene Editing System ... is a complete system for culturing and transfecting human pluripotent stem cells for ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 According ... by Type (Standard Pen Needles, Safety Pen Needles), Needle ... GLP-1, Growth Hormone), Mode of Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - ... This report studies the market for the forecast period ... reach USD 2.81 Billion by 2021 from USD 1.65 ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016  Arkis BioSciences, ... less invasive and more durable cerebrospinal fluid treatments, ... funding.  The Series-A funding is led by Innova ... Fund, and other private investors.  Arkis, new financing ... instrumentation and the market release of its in-licensed ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Any dentist who has made an implant ... process. Many of them do not even offer this as ... high laboratory costs involved. And those who ARE able to ... a high cost that the majority of today,s patients would ... Parsa Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and inventor ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: