Navigation Links
Personalized plans to address barriers to HIV drug adherence boost chances of successful therapy
Date:1/29/2013

PHILADELPHIA HIV patients who participated in an intervention that helped them identify barriers to taking their drugs properly and develop customized coping strategies took a significantly greater amount of their prescribed doses than those receiving standard care, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The results, published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, may point to a new strategy to improve adherence to medications for many other conditions.

"Nonadherence to medical therapy is a silent epidemic that undercuts physicians' efforts to treat diseases from high cholesterol and hypertension to HIV and diabetes," says the new study's lead author, Robert Gross, MD, MSCE, an associate professor of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology. "We tend to view the problem as either a failure on our part or on the patient's part, but the results of our new study show that we can do our jobs better by sharing the planning role with them to overcome possible stumbling blocks to taking their prescribed drugs."

Antiretroviral drugs have turned HIV/AIDS into a manageable, chronic condition for many patients who would have died of the disease before the development of these medications, but they require lifelong adherence to be effective. The drugs have short half lives and need to be in the patients' system at all time in order to keep the virus from replicating, so frequently missing doses drastically cuts the chances that treatment will be successful. Predicting which patients will adhere to therapy has proven difficult.

"The barriers to taking these drugs properly are not universal for some patients, substance abuse or depression might undercut efforts to stay on track, and for others, the complexity of the dosing regimen may pose a problem. Side effects both real and perceived can impact adherence, and psychosocial issues like low health literacy or a chaotic lifestyle can interfere, too," Gross says. "We know from previous research that these issues cannot be overcome by simple education or simple technology alone, and financial incentives typically don't produce a sustained effect."

The researchers studied 180 patients receiving care at three Philadelphia HIV clinics, who were divided into two groups, one of which was randomized to a Managed Problem Solving (MAPS) group, and the other to usual care, which included a meeting with a pharmacist for drug regimen education and the provision of pill organizers. In order to study the benefit of the intervention, only patients who had detectable viral loads were enrolled.

With the help of a trained lay interventionist, MAPS participants received education about their newly prescribed drug regimen and then were taken through a process for identifying their personal barriers to adherence, brainstorming potential solutions, selecting the best option and monitoring its implementation. Potential solutions included memory and cognitive aids to remember to take and refill the drugs, ways to use social supports, and resources to seek help for depression or drug side effects. These plans were made during four initial in-person sessions and 12 telephone meetings that provided help for solving new problems and offering encouragement for obtaining refills and maintaining their regimens. Both groups' adherence to their drug regimen was recorded through the use of an electronically monitored pill bottle.

The results showed that the MAPS group was nearly twice (1.78 times) as likely as the usual care group to be at the better end of the adherence scale. Importantly, the researchers showed that this improvement in adherence translated to improvement in a key marker of survival. The MAPS group also had a 50 percent improvement in their viral suppression rate having no detectable HIV virus in the blood while on treatment. Although the findings showed that patients who had previously taken and failed antiretroviral regimens were only half as likely to be in the better adherence categories and have virologic suppression than those new to therapy, they were equally likely to benefit from the MAPS intervention. Gross notes that for every 25 percent increase in antiretroviral drug doses taken, a patient's chance of having treatment success was doubled in the study.

Patients whose viral loads are suppressed are at much less risk of transmitting HIV to others in the community, so efforts to improve adherence stand to benefit the population at large.

"Importantly, we found that this intervention was equally effective for both patients who were just beginning therapy and those who had already been taking the drugs and had problems adhering, and it continued to be effective over time, unlike many approaches in which patients eventually fall into less adherent behavior," Gross says. "The effect we found also persisted even though the population we studied has many life challenges, including poverty and unemployment."

He and his colleagues suggest that the same approach could be utilized to improve treatment adherence for patients with Hepatitis C, heart failure, and other diseases, particularly if the MAPS process could be scaled back to require less interaction with interventionist, and if patients who may require "booster" sessions could be identified. The authors have made their Managed Problem Solving treatment manual available online for use by other clinicians, at http://www.med.upenn.edu/cceb/maps-form.shtml.


'/>"/>
Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. The Olive Oil Source Introduces Valentine’s Day Labels for Personalized Olive Oil and Vinegar Gifts
2. Springer launches new book series on personalized medicine
3. Personalized antiplatelet treatment improves outcome after PCI
4. New method may allow personalized clinical trial for cancer therapies
5. University of Pennsylvania and Novartis form alliance to expand use of personalized T cell cancer therapy
6. A new genre of diagnostic tests for the era of personalized medicine
7. Personalized Blood Pressure Therapy May Help Diabetics
8. Newly Published by Atlantic Information Services — Dual Eligibles: The New Growth Opportunities Ahead for Health Plans
9. hCGTreatments / Diet Doc hCG Diets & Weight Loss Plans New Prescription Only, All-Natural Ultra Burn Diet Pills
10. First Choice Emergency Room Plans to Open New Facility in Katy, Texas
11. Jan. 17 Atlantic Information Services Webinar Offers Insights on Wall Street’s 2013 Outlook for Health Plans
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/23/2017)... Atlanta, Georgia (PRWEB) , ... January 23, 2017 ... ... leader in providing high-quality general gynecological care and gynecological services for ... to providing personalized care for a wide variety of reproductive services from routine ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... VA (PRWEB) , ... January ... ... Nutrition Partnership (SNP) has launched online education programs and resources at seafoodnutrition.org/programs ... and nutritional benefits of a seafood-rich diet. These resources have been developed ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... ... Valentine’s Day is a time when many people celebrate romance and love by giving cards, ... for the ideal present, Atlanta-based Perimeter Plastic Surgery is offering a Valentine’s Day ... $200 and get $50 free. , “A lot of people just buy the more ...
(Date:1/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 22, 2017 , ... "Photo Cloud ... to create a beautiful 3D slideshow with complete ease," said Christina Austin - CEO ... browser to place in the FCPX timeline. Presets include scenes with one, ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... January 21, 2017 , ... Salveo for life, a ... bringing its product to the United States as part of its presence to expand ... years, Alcovit aims to reduce the productions of nasty toxins as a result of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/23/2017)... -- 7D Surgical announced today that it has ... and Drug Administration (FDA) and a medical device ... commercial launch of its innovative Machine-vision Image Guided ... Surgical System.  The 7D Surgical ... vision algorithms to eliminate the long-standing barriers to ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... WASHINGTON , Jan. 23, 2017 The ... of the Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas ... House of Representatives. The legislation, which was previously introduced ... improve patient access to health care through pharmacists and ... bill include Representatives Brett Guthrie (R-KY), ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... 23, 2017 Stock-Callers.com today presents the ... CPRX ), Sophiris Bio Inc. (NASDAQ: ... and Agile Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: AGRX ). These ... lower in late trade on Friday, January 20 th , ... while shares of health care companies in the S&P 500 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: