Navigation Links
Perception, work-life balance key factors in workplace safety, says UGA study

Athens, Ga. Six thousand workers die on the job in the U.S. each year, and millions more are injured. According to a recent University of Georgia study, a worker's perception of safety in the workplace and the work-life balance established by businesses has a significant effect on on-the-job injury.

"We've known for some time that certain occupations are more dangerous than others due to a variety of physical and other hazards," said Dave DeJoy, UGA professor of health promotion and behavior. "But in the last 20 years, there has been growing evidence that management and organizational factors also play a critical role. That is, actions taken or not taken at the organizational level can either set the stage for injuries or help prevent them."

DeJoy and Todd Smith, a recent graduate of the Health Promotion and Behavior doctoral program in the UGA College of Public Health, authored one of the first studies to examine U.S. safety climate perceptions among a diverse sample of occupations and worker groupsfrom offices to factoriesand to highlight the factors linked to injury. The results were published online in January and will be in the March issue of the Journal of Safety Research.

Companies that run in a smooth and effective manner and have minimal constraints on worker performance can decrease injuries by 38 percent as worker opinions improve, according to survey results. A worker's perception of a positive safety climate can decrease injuries by 32 percent. The safety climate category assessed worker perceptions on the importance of their safety in their work organization.

"We can design the best safety controls, but they must be maintained, and that falls on management," Smith said. "Enacted policies and proceduresnot formalized ones but those acted upondefine a climate of safety."

DeJoy agrees. "Injury is a failure of management. Organizations who blame individuals for injuries do not create a positive safety climate."

In addition to factors identified by the study to decrease injuries, work-family interference was established as a significant risk for occupational injury.

"We used to think work was one thing and family was another, but now there is a realization that work-life balance affects performance and productivity," DeJoy said.

The study looked at the mutual interference between job and family demands. In situations where work interferes with family life or family demands affect job performance, they found that the risk for injury increased 37 percent.

Consistent with previous studies performed by the Department of Labor Statistics, they found whites had higher injury rates than blacks, but both had lower rates than the "other" category, which is predominately made up of Hispanics.

"These results provide guidance for targeting interventions and protective measures to curtail occupational injury in the U.S.," Smith said.

DeJoy was part of a team of researchers that worked with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to put together a quality of work life survey module that featured a number of scales and measures assessing different job and organizational factors. This module was included as part of the General Social Survey and administered to a national representative sample of American adults.

In their study, DeJoy and Smith assessed occupational injury risk in terms of socio-demographic factors, employment characteristics and organizational factors for 1,525 respondents using data from the quality of work life module. The study identified race, occupational category and work-family interferences as risk factors for occupational injury and safety climate and organizational effectiveness as protective factors.

"The data suggests effects are pronounced and generalized across all occupations," said Smith, who spent 12 years as a workplace safety consultant before starting his graduate program at UGA.

"Most prior research on organizational factors has focused on single occupations or single organizations," DeJoy said. "There has been a clear need to examine these factors across a diverse array of occupations and employment circumstances to see how generalizable or pervasive these factors are."

The nine factors they examined were participation, work-family interference, management-employee relations, organizational effectiveness, safety climate, job content, advancement potential, resource adequacy and supervisor support.

Contact: David DeJoy
University of Georgia

Related medicine news :

1. Work-Life Balance Tougher for Couples With Similar Jobs
2. Evidence base for exercise programs for older people still in the balance
3. Signaling molecule identified as essential for maintaining a balanced immune response
4. Many Fathers Struggle to Balance Work, Family: Survey
5. Nervous System Imbalance May Cause Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors
6. Wii key to helping kids balance
7. Stress affects the balance of bacteria in the gut and immune response
8. Study compares balanced propofol sedation with conventional sedation for therapeutic GI endoscopic procedures
9. Yogas Spiritual Balance May Boost Health
10. World Health Report 2010 balanced but incomplete account of how to achieve universal health coverage
11. Study: Tai Chi relieves arthritis pain, improves reach, balance, well-being
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Jobs in hospital medical laboratories and in the ... healthcare staffing agency Aureus Medical Group . These fields, as well ... those searching for healthcare jobs through the company’s website, , The ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Indosoft Inc., developer and ... an application server to improve system efficiency and reliability. , The new Q-Suite 6 ... these standards, the system avoids locking itself into a specific piece of software for ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... recognized once again for its stellar workplace culture with the company’s Cincinnati office ... , Medical Solutions’ Cincinnati office was named a finalist in Cincinnati Business Courier’s ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 25, 2015 , ... For the first time, Vitalalert is donating half of ... campaign. The partnership between the two groups began in 2014 with Vitalalert pledging a ... MAP International was founded in 1954 and is an international Christian-based health organization whose ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Wimbledon Health Partners, ... new Wimbledon Athletics Facebook page to educate the public, parents and ... abnormalities. About 2,000 people under the age of 25 die from sudden cardiac ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... -- Henry Schein, Inc., the world,s largest provider of health ... animal health practitioners, will unveil at the Greater New ... Pavilion , which brings together for the first time ... help any practice or laboratory enter the digital age. ... of experts appearing at the Pavilion. --> ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015  Trovagene, Inc. (NASDAQ: TROV ), ... Chief Executive Officer Antonius Schuh, Ph.D., is scheduled to ... Annual Piper Jaffray Healthcare Conference. th ... Palace Hotel in New York ... Mr. Schuh will be available for one-on-one meetings during ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015 Endo International plc (NASDAQ: ENDP ... , President and CEO, will discuss corporate updates at the ... New York on Wednesday, December 2, 2015 ... on Investor Relations, and then the link to the event. ... start time to visit the site and download any streaming ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: