Navigation Links
People with lower incomes, lower education levels have higher death rates

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Researchers have long suspected that socioeconomic factors like education level and income also might affect survival rates following heart attack. In the June issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Mayo Clinic researchers present new data suggesting that people with lower incomes and education levels are more likely to die after heart attack than more affluent, educated people. Over the past several decades, medical research has helped identify a list of factors that increase a person's risk for myocardial infarction, the disruption of blood flow to the heart commonly known as heart attack. These factors include behaviors such as smoking or inactivity, and a variety of physical characteristics, including high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and obesity. Today, better awareness of heart attack signs and symptoms and improved treatments help many survive that first heart attack.

Mayo authors examined medical records from 705 patients residing in Olmsted County, Minn. -- the location of Mayo Clinic -- who were treated for heart attack between Nov. 1, 2002 and May 31, 2006. Researchers recorded the years of schooling completed (self-reported by the patients via a questionnaire) and neighborhood income (obtained by linking the participant address to the 2000 U.S. Census Bureau data) for each participant. Participants were divided into three income groups and three education groups. Researchers analyzed survival data across these different groups.

Among the 155 deaths recorded during the study period, one-year survival estimates across income groups were lowest for people with the lowest income. Seventy-five percent were survivors among people earning $28,732 to $44,665; 83 percent survived among people earning $49,435 to $53,561; and 86 percent survived among people earning $56,992 to $74,034. Similarly, the survival rates were lowest for participants with less education. Sixty-seven percent were survivors among those who had fewer than 12 years of education; 81 percent survived among people with 12 years of education; and 85 percent survived among people with greater than 12 years of education.

The authors say that while many previous studies have sought to link socioeconomic status and poor outcomes following heart attack, this study design has yielded some unique results.

"Interestingly, despite the higher-than-average socioeconomic status of this population, the associations of individual education and neighborhood income with death after heart attack were stronger than those reported in many previous studies," notes Mayo Clinic cardiovascular researcher Yariv Gerber, Ph.D., the study's lead author. "We think our approach of evaluating two different and complementary indicators of socioeconomic status allowed us to capture a wider spectrum of this complex theory."

Mayo researchers believe that the association observed for education could be related to education's positive effect on factors that include job opportunities, income, housing, access to nutritious foods and health insurance.

"Higher levels of education also could directly affect health through greater knowledge acquired during schooling and greater empowerment and self-efficacy," writes Dr. Gerber. "As recently reported, education is strongly associated with health literacy, which in turn affects one's ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions."

Mayo researchers also point out that more specific mechanisms linking low socioeconomic status to survival following heart attack could also be related to the greater difficulty that poorer individuals with lower education levels have in attending cardiac rehabilitation programs and adhering to medications and lifestyle recommendations.


Contact: John Murphy
Mayo Clinic

Related medicine news :

1. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
2. Are too many people diagnosed as depressed?
3. Bipolar Diagnoses in Younger People Show Huge Increase
4. Preparation for Natural Disasters Critical for People With Diabetes, Chronic Medical Conditions
5. Drug-free treatments offer hope for older people in pain
6. Wanting a bite of everything: Hungry people crave more variety
7. Academy releases emergency preparedness tools to enable millions more people to shelter in place
8. Different HIV rates among gay men and straight people not fully explained by sexual behavior
9. Peoples United Financial CEO Has Surgery
10. The American Pain Foundation (APF) and The HealthCentral Network Collaborate to Develop Enhanced Internet Resources for People with Pain
11. Major differences revealed in how local authorities in the UK support disabled people
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/24/2015)... City, UT (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... Forbes Magazine. For a business, it is critical that the first impression be positive ... business, they are not likely to buy anything or want to return. They will ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... In response to recent news highlighting Oxycodone fraud, Novus Medical ... the United States grew 400 percent between 1999 and 2010, far more than the ... percent of all fatal drug overdoses. (1) , While oxycodone and the extended release ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... The American Association ... their local poison centers through donations on Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015. Since 2012, ... day that inspires people to collaborate in improving their local communities and help ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 24, 2015 , ... With Thanksgiving right around the corner, holiday travel season ... protect your family and vehicle. , According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, ... is sharing the following safety tips from the NHTSA: , ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Abington Hospital ... Aetna Institute of Quality® Bariatric Surgery Facility for treating individuals living with morbid ... health care services available to its members to help them make informed decisions ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015   HeartWare International, Inc ... less-invasive, miniaturized circulatory support technologies that are revolutionizing the ... and Chief Executive Officer Doug Godshall is ... Annual Healthcare Conference on December 1, 2015 at ... 1-2 in New York . ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 24, 2015  Ascendant Solutions, Inc. (Pink Sheets: ASDS ... of Directors has declared a special 1 percent stock dividend ... payable December 14, 2015, to shareholders of record December 7, ... additional shares of common stock. --> ... a strong endorsement of our confidence in Ascendant,s growth strategy ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Nov. 24, 2015  Figure 1, a free mobile-first ... medical cases, has launched a new completely redesigned web ... version allows radiologists, who work primarily on a desktop, ... engage with its radiologist user base, Figure 1 is ... North America (RSNA) Annual Meeting. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: