Navigation Links
People May Eat More When Headlines Bear Bad News

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Tough economic times can lead people to eat much more than they normally would, a recent study finds.

So, to cut down on calories, tune out bad news, the study author suggests.

Study participants who were given numerous messages about tough times ate nearly 40 percent more food than those who were given neutral messages. The researchers also found that messages about tough times led people to desire more high-calorie foods.

In one experiment, participants were told that they were taking part in a taste test for a new kind of M&M's candy. They were told one bowl had M&M's with high-calorie chocolate while the other bowl had M&M's with low-calorie chocolate. In fact, there was no difference in the candies.

Before doing the taste test, the participants were shown posters that contained either neutral sentences or sentences about struggle and adversity. Those who saw the struggle and adversity posters ate about 70 percent more of the "high-calorie" candy than the "low-calorie" option, while those who saw the neutral posters ate about the same amounts of both types of candy.

The study, released online in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the journal Psychological Science, received no funding from private industry.

"It is clear from the studies that taste was not what caused the reactions, it was a longing for calories," study author Juliano Laran, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Miami School of Business Administration, said in a journal news release.

"These findings could have positive implications for individuals in the health care field, government campaigns on nutrition, and companies promoting wellness. And, certainly beware of savvy food marketers bearing bad news," he added.

"The findings of this study come at a time when our country is slowly recovering from the onslaught of negative presidential campaign ads chalked with topics such as the weak economy, gun violence, war, deep political divides, just to name a few problem areas," Laran noted.

"Now that we know this sort of messaging causes people to seek out more calories out of a survival instinct, it would be wise for those looking to kick off a healthier new year to tune out news for a while," he suggested.

More information

The U.S. Department of Agriculture offers nutrition tips.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Psychological Science, news release, Jan. 22, 2013

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Candida Treatment
2. How “Yeast Infection No More” Can Help People Treat Candida Effectively - Health Reviews
3. Smokers who quit before age 40 have lifespan almost as long as people who never smoked
4. People With Egg Allergy Can Safely Get Flu Shot: Experts
5. People seek high-calorie foods in tough times
6. Remedies For Heartburn
7. How Heartburn No More Can Help People Treat Acid Reflux Permanently - Tony Nguyen
8. People can Achieve New Year’s Resolutions and Avoid Self-Sabotage -- so say Authors Tanya Chernova and Joanna Andros in UNDERMIND, from Indigo River Publishing
9. Natural Psoriasis Treatment - How “Psoriasis Free For Life” Helps People Treat Skin Conditions Naturally – Health Reviews
10. Amputations among people with diabetes can be reduced by 50 percent
11. People with low risk for cocaine dependence have differently shaped brain to those with addiction
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
People May Eat More When Headlines Bear Bad News
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori R. Somekh, founder ... of ElderCounsel, a national organization of elder law and special needs planning attorneys. “Membership ... rules. It also provides a forum to network with elder law attorneys nationwide,” said ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... NY (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Ellevate ... people in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their inaugural Summit ... from around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 million. To ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Coveros, ... Development, has been awarded a contract by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid ... to accelerate the enterprise use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and high ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... Cheng, are now treating sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. ... a serious sleep disorder characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 12, 2017 , ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present ... the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium ... Collen, a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... , Oct. 11, 2017  Caris Life Sciences ... on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, today announced ... joined Caris, Precision Oncology Alliance™ (POA) as its 17 ... centers, the St. Jude Crosson Cancer Institute will help ... the use of tumor profiling, making cancer treatment more ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... Oct. 11, 2017  Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ("Hill-Rom") (NYSE: ... facility in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico ... blades. Following ... facility sustained minor structural damage, temporary loss of power ... have been completed, manufacturing operations have resumed, and the ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... 10, 2017   West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. ... injectable drug administration, today shared the results of a ... improving the intradermal administration of polio vaccines. The study ... in May 2017 by Dr. Ondrej Mach , ... Health Organization (WHO), and recently published in the journal ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: