Navigation Links
Penn study shows how electronic medical records can be used to test drug efficacy
Date:2/6/2009

PHILADELPHIA, PA -- For years controversy has surrounded whether electronic medical records (EMR) would lead to increased patient safety, cut medical errors, and reduce healthcare costs. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered a way to get another bonus from the implementation of electronic medical records: testing the efficacy of treatments for disease.

In the first study of its kind, Richard Tannen, M.D., Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, led a team of researchers to find out if patient data, as captured by EMR databases, could be used to obtain vital information as effectively as randomized clinical trials, when evaluating drug therapies. The study appeared online last week in the British Medical Journal.

"Our findings show that if you do studies using EMR databases and you conduct analyses using new biostatistical methods we developed, we get results that are valid," Tannen says. "That's the real message of our paper -- this can work."

In January 2009, President Barack Obama unveiled plans to implement electronic medical records nationwide within five years, arguing that such a plan was crucial in the fight against rising health care costs. Of the nearly $900 billion in Obama's planned stimulus package currently before the United States Senate, $20 billion is proposed for electronic health records.

Tannen says he and his group recognized that the large EMR databases containing compiled medical information could potentially give researchers the ability to study groups reflective of the total population, not just those who participate in clinical trials, and circumvent studies too costly or unethical for clinical trials. However, such databases contain observational information, which critics argue do not offer the same level of control as randomized trials.

"Our study cautiously, yet strongly, suggests that enormous amounts of information within electronic medical records can be used to expand evidence of how we should or shouldn't manage healthcare," Tannen says.

To address criticisms of observational studies, Tannen's group had to first determine a way to use EMR databases for insights on therapy efficacy and then prove the results they found were valid.

Beginning six years ago, Tannen's team selected six previously performed randomized trials with 17 measured outcomes and compared them to study data from an electronic database -- the UK general practice research database (GPRD), which included the medical records of roughly 8 million patients. Treatment efficacy was determined by the prevalence of cardiovascular outcomes, such as stroke, heart attack and death.

After using standard biostatistical methods to adjust for differences in the treated and untreated groups in the analysis of the database information, Tannen found that there were no differences in the database outcomes compared to randomized clinical trials in nine out of 17 outcomes.

In the other eight outcomes, Tannen's group used an additional new biostatistical approach they discovered that controlled for differences between the treated and untreated groups prior to the time the study began. By using the new biostatistical method instead of the standard approach, the researchers showed there were no differences between the outcomes in the EMR database study compared to the randomized clinical trials.

Though Tannen warns the ability to use EMR databases from the United States to measure the efficacy of therapies will take more than 10 years of national data, he says the results of his study should serve as a catalyst for more researchers to explore the accuracy of the information that can be obtained using EMR database studies.

"An appropriately configured EMR database could offer an invaluable tool, but we need to get to work now on how to configure it properly," Tannen says. "If we don't worry about this issue right now and promote a higher investment in the area of EMR research, we'll lose an opportunity, an enormous health opportunity."


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
2. New study shows promise in reducing surgical risks associated with surgical bleeding
3. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
4. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
5. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
6. Preclinical study suggests organ-transplant drug may aid in lupus fight
7. Ability to cope with stress can increase good cholesterol in older white men, study finds
8. High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk, Tulane study says
9. Mailman School of Public Health study examines link between racial discrimination and substance use
10. Pitt study finds inequality in tobacco advertising
11. Stanford study highlights cost-effective method of lowering heart disease risks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... practitioner, is known locally for a series of therapeutic sessions to help Los ... their characters and in their lives. The series, known as “Mindfulness for Actors ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... MetLoop ... revolutionary new 2.0 version at the International Roofing Expo in Orlando, Florida on ... the world's most advanced weather technology in the hands of consumers, roofing contractors, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... The Wickman Agency in Garland, ... the local community. Pledging to select a new beneficiary every 60 days, the ... Their goal is to bring community awareness to important local causes by forming ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Ongoing news of the ravages of traumatic brain injury (TBI) ... survey that takes a closer look at cases of TBI being managed by their ... TBI among the aging population, and identifies the challenges associated with their care. , ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 10, 2016 , ... Armune BioScience signed a definitive agreement with ... service centers across the country. Launched in April of 2015, Apifiny is the only ... cancer. Apifiny order volume exceeded 3,000 tests in 2015. Primary care physicians and urologists ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... DALLAS , Feb. 10, 2016  Fotona, based in ... it will launch its new ST PRO Lightwalker dental laser ... Chicago Dental Society from 25-27 February, 2016 in booth #4815. ... tissue dental laser with many of the features of the ... $49,900, the ST PRO competitive price will be very attractive ...
(Date:2/10/2016)...   Genomic Health, Inc. (Nasdaq: GHDX ) today ... ended December 31, 2015. --> --> ... compared with $69.1 million in the fourth quarter of 2014, an ... 9 percent compared with the same period in the prior year. ... $63.9 million in the fourth quarter of 2015, an increase of ...
(Date:2/10/2016)...  Cepheid (Nasdaq: CPHD ) today announced ... President and Chief Operating Officer, has been promoted ... Officer.  In his new capacity, Mr. Kocmond,s responsibilities ... Operations in addition to Manufacturing Operations, Engineering, Technical ... to report to John Bishop , Cepheid,s ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: