Navigation Links
Penn researchers find targeted therapy combination overcomes treatment resistance in liver cancer
Date:4/13/2008

SAN DIEGO Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Abramson Cancer Center reported today at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research that combining two targeted therapies overcomes treatment resistance in liver cancer cell lines. The team is currently designing a trial to test the combination in patients.

Liver cancer is resistant to many chemotherapies and to cell-death inducing agents. Last year, however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved sorafenib (Nexavar) as a treatment for liver cancer after a clinical trial showed that the targeted agent prolonged survival in some patients.

Unfortunately not all patients respond to sorafenib and the drug does not cure the disease.

Therefore, Wafik El-Deiry, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine, Genetics, and Pharmacology, and co-Program Leader of Radiation Biology in the Abramson Cancer Center, and colleagues have tested other targeted agents in combination with sorafenib.

They found that treating liver cancer cells with sorafenib and an antibody or the natural ligand that stimulates programmed cell death via the TRAIL pathway, dramatically increases the rate of cell death.

Sorafenib by itself causes a little cell death, but not that much, Dr. El-Deiry said. Now you combine sorafenib and TRAIL, and all of the sudden you get massive cell death. It is a real synergistic interaction. It is very profound killing.

The combination works regardless of whether the researchers use a monoclonal antibody that stimulates the TRAIL receptor, which resides on the surface of the cancer cells, or the receptors natural ligand, a small protein called TRAIL. Both the antibody and the TRAIL ligand are currently being tested as single agents in patients.

Within the next several months, Dr. El-Deirys team expects to announce the details for a trial testing the combination in patients.

In a healthy individual, the immune system uses the TRAIL pathway to rid the body of unwanted cells, including precancerous ones. Once cancer develops, however, the cells often become less responsive to TRAIL activation, in part because of an overabundance of a protein called Mcl-1, according to Dr. El-Deiry. His team found that sorafenib reduces the amount of Mcl-1 in the cancer cells, restoring their sensitivity to TRAIL-induced cell death.

Although the Penn investigators focused their current report on liver cancer, they discovered that the sorafenib-TRAIL combination also kills colon cancer cell in vitro and in animal models.


'/>"/>

Contact: Olivia Fermano
Olivia.Fermano@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers find disparities in depression among older Hispanics in US
2. Researchers Identify New Genetic Links to Psoriasis
3. Penn researchers discover modus operandi of heart muscle protein
4. Researchers Pursuing Nasal Anthrax Vaccine
5. Researchers find mass media campaigns useful
6. Researchers pilot new electronic system for infectious illness
7. Researchers Find Gene Mutation That Increases Asthma Risk
8. Researchers Define Mechanism of Methamphetamine Addiction
9. Attacks against medical researchers: Time to take a stand
10. Researchers Able to Continue their Work to Help Patients Thanks to McDevitt Excellence in Research Awards from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation
11. More genes for Lou Gehrigs disease identified, according to Penn researchers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/24/2017)... Houston, TX (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 ... ... now offering promotions on tooth replacement options at his office, Antoine Dental Center. ... dental implants for $18,499. Some restrictions may apply, but patients can learn more ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... An in-depth computational analysis of genetic variants implicated ... to eight genes that may explain why susceptibility to one of the disorders could ... study published today in the journal npj Schizophrenia. , “There is a wealth ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... ... urges: “Security needs to be a top priority because it’s not if you will ... in online safety, especially when it comes to digital health care. , Improvements in ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... The narrative in “ Signal 8: ... ’s true account of his paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes the tragedies he saw, as ... attempts to overcome them. , Schanssema, initially unsure of the career path he wanted ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at ... concerning this present generation. Yisrayl makes an astounding statement when he says that ... explains that the Bible details the current times so plainly that anyone should be ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... 2017  This report analyzes the worldwide markets for ... Products: Intermediates, Analytical, and Others. The End ... and Agrochemicals. The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for ... Europe , and Rest of World. Annual estimates ... 2022. Also, a six-year historic analysis is provided for ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... report to their offering. ... The latest research Urinary Incontinence Drugs Price Analysis and ... global Urinary Incontinence market. The research answers the following questions: ... for Urinary Incontinence and their clinical attributes? How are they positioned ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... MINNEAPOLIS , Feb. 23, 2017  Cogentix Medical, ... manufactures and markets innovative proprietary products for the urology ... and fiscal year ended December 31, 2016 before the ... The Company will host a conference call and ... on Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: