Navigation Links
Patients want more risks disclosed before treatment
Date:8/8/2012

Australian doctors sometimes fail to warn patients of risks that could affect the patient's quality of life before providing treatment or surgery, a new study led by University of Melbourne researchers has shown.

Published in PLoS Medicine today, the study showed that some doctors, particularly surgeons, are not explaining the risk of specific outcomes that matter most to patients.

Overlooked risks that led to a legal claim or complaint included chronic pain, sexual dysfunction, visual or hearing loss, and the need for re-operation.

Lead author Dr Marie Bismark from the University of Melbourne School of Population Health said the study revealed that doctors may routinely underestimate the importance patients place on understanding certain risks in advance of treatment.

"Increasingly, doctors are expected to advise and empower patients to make rational choices by sharing information that may affect treatment decisions, including risks of adverse outcomes," she said.

"However, doctors, especially surgeons, are often unsure which clinical risks they should disclose and discuss with patients before treatment and this is reflected in this study."

The authors found that the most common justifications doctors gave for not telling patients about particular risks before treatment were that they considered such risks too rare to warrant discussion, or that the specific risk was covered by a more general risk that was discussed.

"It is not necessary, or helpful, for doctors to provide a laundry list of all possible risks. Instead, doctors should focus on discussing those risks which are likely to matter most to the patient before them," she said.

From a sample of nearly 10,000 patient complaints and malpractice claims from Australia between 2001 and 2008, researchers identified 481 disputes involving alleged deficiencies in obtaining informed consent.

The authors found that 45 (9%) of the cases studied were disputed duty casesthat is, they involved head-to-head disagreements over whether a particular risk ought to have been disclosed before treatment.

Two-thirds of these cases involved surgical procedures, and the majority of them related to five specific outcomes that had quality of life implications for patients, including chronic pain and the need for re-operation.

Most of the other 436 claims and complaints studied involved factual disagreements between doctors and patientsarguments over who said what, and when.

"The best way to avoid this type of 'he said/she said' dispute is by keeping a clear record of the consent discussion that takes place before any surgical procedure, " Dr Bismark said.


'/>"/>
Contact: Rebecca Scott
rebeccas@unimelb.edu.au
61-383-440-181
University of Melbourne
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. No difference in death rates among patients exposed to common rheumatoid arthritis drugs
2. Weekends More Fatal for Older Patients With Head Injury: Study
3. Coach could be key in helping stroke patients
4. Minority Patients at Higher Risk of Having Ambulances Diverted
5. Tourette Patients Benefit From Behavioral Therapy: Study
6. Moffitt Cancer Center researcher & colleagues test new drug for patients with neuroendocrine tumors
7. Off-label drug use common, but patients may not know theyre taking them, Mayo finds
8. Trauma Patients at Higher Risk of Dying of Hypothermia: Study
9. Virtual Patients New Addition to Psychiatry?
10. New study suggests clinicians overlook alcohol problems if patients are not intoxicated
11. Genes May Be Key for Patients With Multiple Colon Polyps
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether ... latter, setting the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, ... their goal. , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out of control. Prone to extreme mood ... something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers Marcy. “If there was a ... children and say he was going to kill them. If we were driving on ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® of San ... Society and the Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to and from ... adults to ensure the highest quality of life and ongoing independence. Getting to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Haute Beauty ... Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the network’s newest partner. ... and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery should be invisible.” ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Venture Construction Group (VCG) sponsors Luke’s Wings 5th ... Woodmont Country Club at 1201 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland, 20852. The event raised ... have been wounded in battle and their families. Venture Construction Group is a 2016 ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. , June 24, ... GBT ), a biopharmaceutical company developing novel ... with significant unmet needs, today announced the closing ... 6,400,000 shares of common stock, at the public ... the shares in the offering were offered by ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... BEIJING , June 24, 2016 Dehaier ... or the "Company"), which develops, markets and sells medical ... China , signed a strategic cooperation agreement with ... as "Hongyuan Supply Chain") on June 20, 2016, to ... Under the strategic cooperation agreement, Dehaier will leverage Hongyuan ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... NAMUR , Belgium , ...  (NYSE MKT: VNRX), today announced the appointment of ... Board of Directors as a Non-Executive Director, effective ... the Company,s Audit, Compensation and Nominations and Governance ... Board, Dr. Futcher will provide independent expertise and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: