Navigation Links
Patients starting Parkinson's drug rasagiline earlier do better
Date:1/26/2009

Tampa, FL (Jan. 26, 2009) There is hope that the drug rasagiline can do what no other medication for Parkinson's disease now does -- slow the progression of a devastating degenerative brain disease that eventually robs people of their ability to move and function.

Now a new study looking at the long-term effects of rasagiline (Azilect) on newly diagnosed patients indicates that people who began the drug earlier continued to do better than those for whom treatment was delayed six months. The study "Long-term Outcome of Early Versus Delayed Rasagiline Treatment in Early Parkinson's Disease" was recently published in the early online version of the journal Movement Disorders.

"Patients who received rasagiline right from the beginning rather than after a six-month delay experienced less progression of the clinical signs and symptoms of Parkinson's disease that interfere with activities of daily living such as eating, walking and dressing," said the study's lead author Robert A. Hauser, MD, director of the University of South Florida Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center. "This is potentially consistent with a slowing of underlying disease progression, although other possible mechanisms also need to be considered."

The study, sponsored by Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Israel), Teva Neuroscience, Inc. (USA) and H. Lundbeck A/S (Denmark), was a long-term open label extension of the multisite trial "TVP-1012 (rasagiline) in Early Monotherapy for Parkinson's Disease Outpatients" study, known as TEMPO. In TEMPO, more than 400 untreated patients with early Parkinson's disease were randomly assigned to rasagiline for a year (1 mg daily or 2 mg daily) or to placebo for six months followed by rasagiline for six months (2 mg daily). At the end of a year, patients receiving rasagiline from the start fared better as measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. They experienced less worsening of motor symptoms, such as rigidity and tremor, and had fewer problems with activities of daily living than patients who began rasagiline six months later.

The open-label extension study followed more than 300 patients from the TEMPO study for up to 6.5 years. In this extension study, all patients continued on rasagiline (1 mg. daily) and could take other Parkinson's disease medications as needed. The researchers found those who started rasagiline right from the beginning of the TEMPO study continued to fare better than patients in the delayed-start group. Over the course of the entire study, the early-start group had 16 percent less progression of the signs and symptoms of Parkinson's disease, and this greater clinical benefit was observed even as patients received conventional Parkinson's disease medications in addition to rasagiline. Rasagiline appeared to be well tolerated in this long-term study.

If the clinical outcomes from the TEMPO and extension study hold up under further scrutiny, it may indicate that early initiation of rasagiline confers a protective effect against disease progression, Dr. Hauser said. "If this is the case, it reinforces the importance of individuals being diagnosed and treated as soon as possible."

The study authors point out that early initiation of any drug to relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease may lead to a better clinical outcome compared to delayed administration -- something that will be elucidated as more delayed-start studies are performed with other Parkinson's medications.


'/>"/>

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3300
University of South Florida Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study examines risk factors for cancer in unaffected breast of breast cancer patients
2. New Web Site Connects Patients with Experienced Doctors
3. Survey could help pediatricians better treat patients
4. Mayo Clinic Announces Sharing Mayo Clinic Blog for Patients, Employees
5. Georgia Ranks Fourth in the Number of Untreated HIV Patients in the United States
6. Mayo Clinic Announces Sharing Mayo Clinic Blog for Patients, Employees
7. AutoGenomics CYP 2C19 Test Used in Study to Personalize Clopidogrel (Plavix) Dosing in Patients
8. UT Southwestern researchers find drug-coated stents less risky for heart bypass patients
9. New Test May Help Kidney Transplant Patients
10. Physicians Agree Moderate Weight Loss Will Help Patients Manage Their Type 2 Diabetes
11. Improve Your Patients Adherence to Contraception
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... May 04, 2016 , ... World Patent Marketing , ... a sports invention that aids in the improvement of the grip and swing ... $9 billion," says Scott Cooper, CEO and Creative Director of World Patent Marketing. ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... 04, 2016 , ... Trinity Health today launched its inaugural ... aimed at improving care and reducing readmission rates for patients who are dually ... Health is to drive innovation that transforms our ministry and our industry to ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... 2016 , ... NCPDP announced today highlights from ... Frank Luntz, sharing a dynamic, bi-partisan environmental scan of healthcare-related campaign issues. Today’s ... model solution to help stem the tide of the opioid epidemic and put ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 04, 2016 , ... Level ... -- announced her verbal commitment to the University of Arizona for the fall of ... announced her decision last month. Brovedani’s commitment to the GymCats came from her connection ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... May 04, 2016 , ... IsoComforter, Inc., ... introduction of the innovative newly improved Iso-Hip Wrap. The newly designed hip ... design enhances comfort and enables the patient to enjoy the benefits of cold ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2016)... , May 4, 2016 According ... Development, Growth and Demand Forecast to 2022 - Industry Insights ... (Hospital, Diagnostic Center and Others)" by P&S Market Research, the ... million in 2015, and it is expected to grow at ... the high slice type segment is expected to witness the ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... 4, 2016 Research ... "Global Acute Ischemic Stroke Market and Competitive ... offering.       (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160330/349511LOGO ... Ischemic Stroke Market and Competitive Landscape Highlights ... Stroke pipeline products, Acute Ischemic Stroke epidemiology, ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... KANSAS CITY, Mo. , May 3, 2016 ... of Kansas Medical Center,s Institute for Advancing Medical ... develop and commercialize new drugs, diagnostics and medical ... organizations provides BioNovus Innovations with rights to license, ... "This partnership ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: