Navigation Links
Patient with rare disorder responds to cancer drug
Date:2/13/2008

A rare disorder caused by an excess of two types of immune cellsthe mast cell found in various tissues and its blood-based twin, the basophilhas successfully been treated with a cancer drug, report scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study, now available online at the Web site of the journal Haematologica, was a collaborative effort led by Dean Metcalfe, M.D., chief of the NIAID Laboratory of Allergic Diseases and Jan Cools, Ph.D., a staff scientist, at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven within the Vlaams Institute for Biotechnology and the Department of Molecular and Developmental Genetics, in Leuven, Belgium.

A few years ago, the 61-year-old patient was referred to the NIH Clinical Center because he was quite ill with symptoms of systemic mastocytosis, a disease caused by excessive numbers of mast cells, and chronic basophilic leukemia, a rare type of bone marrow cancer characterized by an overabundance of basophils.

Systemic mastocytosis often results from a mutation in the gene that codes for the KIT receptor found on the surface of mast cells, a discovery first made by Dr. Metcalfe and his team in 1995. In this patient, however, the KIT receptor mutation was ruled out. In further studies, NIAID researchers and their collaborators found a chromosomal abnormality that led to the discovery of a fusion protein in the cell, created by two genes joining together. They also found that the fusion protein was the basis of the disorder and figured that the patient should respond to imatinib, a drug already approved to treat different types of cancers and systemic mastocytosis. After the patient was treated with the cancer drug imatinib, his clinical symptoms improved quickly and dramatically, and he remains in clinical remission three years after treatment was started.

This is a rare report of the simultaneous occurrence of these two conditions in one patient, and the first describing a response to therapy. Diagnosing a patient who has such an atypical disorder can be difficult, says Dr. Metcalfe. Recently, another patient with similar clinical findings was referred to their clinic. Based on their experience with the first patient, the researchers started treatment with imatinib and, according to Dr. Metcalfe, this patient also is responding well.

Identifying this newly recognized chromosomal abnormality and the fusion protein in patients who present with clinical findings of systemic mastocytosis and chronic basophilic leukemia may enable doctors to successfully treat these individuals with imatinib, according to Dr. Metcalfe.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sitara Maruf
marufs@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Marijuana Use Among MS Patients Raises Risk for Cognitive, Mood Problems
2. Tango Classes Put Parkinsons Patients a Step Ahead
3. Arizona Nurses Rally at Capitol for Patient Safety - Thursday
4. HPV-positive head and neck cancer patients fare better than HPV-negative patients
5. DCIS patients overestimate breast cancer risks
6. Anxiety linked to newly diagnosed DCIS patients overestimation of breast cancer risks
7. New Patient Safety Proposed Regulation Aims to Improve Health Care Quality and Patient Safety
8. Precious Time - Scientists discover how long heart failure patients can expect to live
9. Michigan Kidney Patient Goes Above and Beyond to Help His Community - Awarded National DPC Hero Award
10. Patients with larger social networks may fare better after an operation
11. A new agent for the treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome; and more
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... The law firm of ... N.Y., is pleased to announce Westchester resident Lauren C. Enea has joined the firm ... the firm, will concentrate her practice in elder law, Medicaid planning and applications, and ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... Judy Buchanan, ... Master in Frederick, MD. Judy says, “I am passionate about sharing Reiki as ... a very difficult and challenging time.” , A Certified Medical Reiki™ Master trained ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... stories about real people of God in congregations across the United States. ... Presbyterian minister ordained in 1964 who has served congregations in seven states throughout ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... March 23, 2017 , ... The ... 3rd location in the greater Houston Area. The new location is located at 2255 ... Luke’s Hospital in Springwoods Village. This newest location will provide patients living in the ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , ... March 23, 2017 , ... The IoT (Internet ... WiFi connectivity are making a huge impact on businesses and individual consumers alike. ... the IoT will have a value anywhere from $4 trillion to $11 trillion dollars ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... BOTHELL, Wash. , March 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... developer of advanced medical technology for non-invasive surgery, ... the Mirabilis System for treatment of uterine fibroids ... that it had received approval from the US ... study of the Mirabilis System in the United ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... -- Mosaic Life Care, based in St. Joseph, Missouri , has ... of 58 clinics, located in 22 cities, and its flagship St. Joseph Medical Center. ... the delivery of health care to its patients, including the insurance, billing and collections ... ... Mosaic Life Care St. Joseph Medical Center ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... and INDIANAPOLIS , March 23, 2017 ... ) and the William Sansum Diabetes Center have established ... people affected by diabetes through enhanced research, education and ... and cardiovascular disease bears a disproportionate weight on Latino ... said David Kerr , M.D., FRCPE, director of ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: