Navigation Links
Patient preferences play role in racial disparities in rheumatoid arthritis treatment
Date:4/7/2009

Racial disparities in the delivery of healthcare occur even among insured populations with access to care. This suggests that some of the differences in health care utilization among different racial groups may be due to patient preferences. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment decisions are frequently complex, requiring multiple trade-offs between symptom relief, long-term reduction of disability, adverse events and serious complications. A new study examined whether African American and white patients with RA differ in how they make trade-offs between risks and benefits related to treatment. The study was published in the April issue of Arthritis Care & Research (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/77005015/home).

Led by Dr. Liana Fraenkel of Yale University, researchers examined how 136 RA patients made trade-offs about specific treatment characteristics related to commonly used RA drugs. These included benefits such as the chance of remission or symptom improvement, and risks such as side effects and theoretical risk of cancer. They analyzed how patients made trade-offs in treatment decisions to determine how respondents value specific characteristics.

The results showed that there were significant differences in the ways that African American and white patients evaluated treatment characteristics. African American patients, who comprised 49 percent of the study sample, attached greater importance to the risk of toxicity, particularly for rare, serious adverse events, and less importance to the likelihood of benefit than white patients. For example, African Americans assigned the greatest importance to the theoretical risk of cancer, whereas white patients were most concerned with the likelihood of remission and halting radiographic progression.

Until now, it has been widely believed that differences in treatment by race can be corrected by changes in either health care providers or the health care system. This is because research on health care disparities has largely focused on access to care, lack of insurance, quality of care due to unconscious practitioner bias and social factors.

Although the Institute of Medicine's model of health disparities includes an acknowledgement that these may be due in part to differences in preferences of care, few studies have tested this notion and racial/cultural differences in risk/benefit perception remain an under-researched field.

"Our study is important because, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to formally assess whether risk preference for therapy is one of the potential explanations of the lower use among African Americans of more effective, although more risky, therapy for a chronic disabling disease," the authors state. They point out that disparate models of health and illness may lead to disparate patient preferences, as well as limited communication during clinical visits.

The study showed that African Americans were significantly more risk averse than their white counterparts, which the authors theorize may be due to "cultural risk aversion for gains." This type of risk aversion is based on a learned distrust or low expectations of the healthcare system that arise when a subgroup observes significant gains in lifespan, economic prosperity and power of the larger culture, but does not experience these gains even though they live in the same country or culture.

The authors conclude: "Given these results, physicians should confirm that patients have accurate expectations regarding the natural history and treatment of their disease, and ensure that patient preferences are based on an informed assessment of the pros and cons related to available treatment options."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sean Wagner
medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.com
781-388-8550
Wiley-Blackwell
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Womens Online Health Resource Excels in Patient Education
2. Allscripts Integrates Electronic Health Record With Innovative Patient Kiosk
3. Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative Stakeholders Convene in Washington, DC for Working Meeting
4. Allscripts Integrates Electronic Health Records with Innovative Patient Kiosk
5. Study: Every 1.7 minutes a Medicare beneficiary experiences a patient safety event
6. Diabetes Ten City Challenge Reduces Health Care Costs and Improves Patient Health
7. Interactive Patient Care Technology Showcased at HIMSS 2009 is Proving to Advance Hospital Performance
8. Orion Health Concerto Whiteboard Helps Emergency Rooms and Wards Track Patient Status
9. First Patients Enrolled in the Access-Europe Study of The MitraClip(R) Therapy
10. Hollow mask illusion fails to fool schizophrenia patients
11. DDB Worldwide and M/A/R/C Research Find in Time of Economic Crisis: Health Is the New Wealth, Survey Shows Empowering Patients Is Key to Influence
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2017)... Atlanta, Georgia (PRWEB) , ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... Theresa Therilus, founder of Pet Protect Law that assists dog owners in ... will assist new owners in taking the natural next step to protect their new ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , ... March 30, 2017 , ... Sports Brand EXOUS ... brace, which retails normally at $29.97; for the remaining days of March, the price ... been reduced to a special price of just $10 (regular retail price $19.97). , ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... receive FASTBRACES® in Carnegie, OK, from Dr. Jamie Cameron, with or ... teeth efficiently, compared to traditional orthodontic treatment. Depending on each patient’s case, treatment ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) , ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... Maryland, is proud to announce the finalization of the company’s executive management team with ... team and leading operations is Curio Wellness’ Chief Operating Officer, Ted Dumbauld , ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... Hamlin Dental Group, multi-location dental ... offering laser dental treatments. Dental lasers are safe and effective options, and can be ... and can improve the overall quality of care. , Dr. Hamid Reza of Hamlin ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  Glenmark Pharmaceuticals, ... for GSP 301, an investigational fixed-dose combination of ... mcg) administered twice-daily as a nasal spray being ... These results are from a recently completed Phase ... GSP 301 combination therapy versus mometasone, olopatadine or ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017 ... a report, which provides an exhaustive study of ... study, nearly 242 companies are functional in this ... competitive. With the leading companies, such as GlaxoSmithKline ... LP, focusing aggressively on various marketing strategies to ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... Mar. 29, 2017 Research and Markets has ... report to their offering. ... The global lifestyle drugs market to grow at ... The report, Global Lifestyle Drugs Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based ... report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: