Navigation Links
Patient Wishes Should Guide End-of-Life Care, Researchers Say
Date:3/21/2013

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Dying patients are happier, less depressed, have less pain and survive longer when their end-of-life care wishes are known and followed, researchers report.

This type of patient-centered care can also help keep health costs down for patients who don't want aggressive treatment, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) research team said.

"You can improve care while reducing cost by making sure that everything you do is centered on what the patients want, what his or her specific goals are and tailor a treatment plan to ensure we provide the specific care he or she wants," Dr. Jonathan Bergman, a clinical scholar and fellow in the urology department, said in a university news release.

In many cases, dying patients are given aggressive treatments that don't help them and result in higher costs, according to the article in the March 20 issue of the journal JAMA Surgery.

Patients who want aggressive care should receive it, but many don't want it and haven't been asked about their wishes, according to Bergman and colleagues, who are testing patient-centered care on cancer patients.

To change the situation, doctors need to be educated about patient-centered care, the researchers said. They also suggested that changes to Medicare should be considered. But this is a highly controversial topic that has been sidelined after recent suggested changes were characterized as creating "death panels."

"Given the disproportionate cost of care at the very end of life, the issue should be revisited," Bergman and colleagues wrote. "Addressing goals of care, not to deny aggressive care to those who want it, but to ensure that we deliver aggressive care only to those who do, reduces costs and improves outcomes."

The study authors noted that, according to the results of a 2004 study, 30 percent of Medicare dollars are spent on the 5 percent of beneficiaries who die each year, and one-third of the costs in the final year of life occur during the final month.

Previous research has shown that patient-centered care can reduce the costs in the last week of life by 36 percent and that patients who receive such care are less likely to die in an intensive care unit.

The researchers said that another way to encourage patient-centered care for dying patients is to include it as an accountability measure in the Joint Commission's annual ranking of U.S. hospitals. The commission accredits hospitals.

More information

The AGS Foundation for Health in Aging has more about end-of-life care.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, March 20, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Higher-spending hospitals have fewer deaths for emergency patients
2. Researchers uncover a viable way for colorectal cancer patients to overcome drug resistance
3. Vaccine yielded encouraging long-term survival rates in certain patients with NSCLC
4. Study finds doctors have exaggerated fears when starting patients on insulin
5. Diagnostic Scans Tied to Radiation Risk for Gastro Patients
6. Predictors identified for rehospitalization among post-acute stroke patients
7. Pulse pressure elevation could presage cerebrovascular disease in Alzheimers patients
8. Breast cancer patients suffer treatment-related side effects long after completing care
9. Heart failure patients with diabetes may benefit from higher glucose levels
10. Gastro Woes Often Strike Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients
11. Short Walks May Ease Fatigue in Pancreatic Cancer Patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Patient Wishes Should Guide End-of-Life Care, Researchers Say
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... TherapySites, the leading ... with Tennessee Counseling Association. This new relationship allows TherapySites to continue ... Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , "TCA is extremely excited about ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... On June 10-11, 2016, ... the 2016 Cereal Festival and World’s Longest Breakfast Table in Battle Creek, MI, where ... city’s history as home to some of the world’s leading providers of cereal and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Experts from the American ... Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. ... including advance care planning, healthcare costs and patient and family engagement. , AIR ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe earned his Bachelors in ... School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine at Scripps Green Hospital ... at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the opportunity to train in ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from ... avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this ... coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- MedSource announced today that it has selected Datatrial,s ... choice.  This latest decision demonstrates MedSource,s commitment to ... by offering a state-of-the-art electronic data capture (EDC) ... the EDC platform of choice in exchange for ... long been a preferred EDC platform by our ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016  In a startling report released ... failing their residents by lacking a comprehensive, proven plan to eliminate ... a definitive ranking of how states are tackling the worst drug ... only four states – Kentucky , ... Vermont . Of the 28 failing states, three – ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has announced ... report to their offering. ... a favourable commercial environment for MedImmune to enter. The US ... will serve to drive considerable growth for effective anti-influenza medications. ... cap sales considerably, but development is still in its infancy. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: