Navigation Links
Passengers on 'Bat' Plane Cleared of Rabies Risk

THURSDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Health investigators have confirmed that a bat that flew through the cabin of a U.S. commercial airliner last summer did not transmit rabies to 45 of 50 passengers assessed, the three flight crew members or 16 ground crew members who were in close proximity to the winged stowaway.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention located and interviewed nearly all of the passengers on board the early morning flight that departed from Madison, Wis., last August. Neither the passengers nor any crew members were in physical contact with the bat or its saliva, and all said they were alert during the flight, the CDC said.

The bat, which took flight in the aircraft cabin shortly after takeoff, was temporarily barricaded in a restroom, the report said. But after the plane returned to the airport, the feared intruder escaped outdoors and could not be tested for rabies.

A series of injections can prevent rabies in people exposed to the virus, but the shots must be given right away, or the disease can be fatal. While none of those on board required vaccination in this instance, bats active in daylight can pose risks for rabies transmission, the CDC warned in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, published Thursday.

"Although a bat, or any wildlife, aboard a commercial airliner is unlikely, public health practitioners should be prepared to respond to potential exposures to rabies and other infectious agents, including during air travel," the CDC said in a statement.

In the previous decade, 21 humans in the United States suffered rabies infections, and bats were the cause in 15 cases, the CDC said.

An inspection of the airport facilities revealed no other evidence of bat activity or droppings, but the CDC made several recommendations to reduce the possibility of bat exposure. It suggested the airport place netting over chinks and crevices that might house bats, and said the jetways at each gate should be extended and retracted before the first morning flight. Airport employees should also be trained on correct procedures for bat capture and preparation for testing, the report said.

Symptoms of rabies in people include fever, headache and fatigue, followed by confusion, hallucinations and paralysis. Once symptoms appear, death is likely.

More information

To learn more about rabies, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

-- Margaret Steele

SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 13, 2012, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Titanic Passengers Less Selfish Than Some in Other Disasters
2. Teen passengers: The other distraction for teen drivers
3. BMC study shows diverting passengers to elevators could help reduce falls at Logan Airport
4. California IVF Discount/Rebate Program Eases Risk for Older Mothers
5. Explorers Bounty Puffed Fruit Snacks Helping Parents Battle Summer Obesity
6. New Safety Bath and Sill Mats Help Prevent Slip and Fall in Bathrooms - from Martinson-Nicholls
7. Abatement Technologies Announces High-Velocity RAPTOR™ Air Movers for Water Damage Restoration Contractors
8. Battlefield camaraderie yields long-term dividends for veterans, study finds
9. Gourmet Diet Delivery Unites with First Lady's Battle Against Obesity The Fresh Diet Begins Delivering Meals to DC
10. As Health Reform Summit Looms, Battle Lines Are Drawn
11. Sonitor Technologies Announces New Staff Tag and Battery Powered Ultrasound Receiver
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Passengers on 'Bat' Plane Cleared of Rabies Risk
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... health professionals, announced today its affiliation with Tennessee Counseling Association. This ... the network of the Tennessee Counseling Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... A revolution is ... emergency ambulance transport experience for the millions of people who require these medical ... the taxi industry through the use of technology. Now, SmartEMS has put forth ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... Quality metrics are proliferating in cancer ... they remain in the eye of the beholder, according to experts who offered insights ... American Journal of Managed Care. For the full issue, click here . , ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... Pixel Film ... Pro X. , "Film editors can give their videos a whole new perspective by ... Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice Levels contains over 30 ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer ... through a fitness app. The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading ... a one size fits all type program , They don’t eliminate all the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) today ... allow biopharmaceutical companies to more easily share health care ... coverage decisions, a move that addresses the growing need ... The recommendations address restrictions in the sharing of product ... a prohibition that hinders decision makers from accessing HCEI ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... to their offering. ... World Market for Companion Diagnostics covers the world market for ... report includes the following: , World IVD ... (N. America, EU, ROW), 2015-2020 , World IVD Companion ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Belgium , June 24, 2016 ... the appointment of Dr. Edward Futcher ... Non-Executive Director, effective June 23, 2016.Dr. Futcher was ... Nominations and Governance Committees.  As a non-executive member ... independent expertise and strategic counsel to VolitionRx in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: