Navigation Links
Parents' Worries Hamper Kids' Asthma Treatment
Date:9/4/2007

Moms and dads withhold drugs because of side effect concerns, study finds

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Parents' worries about the safety of asthma drugs may prevent asthmatic children from getting the relief they deserve, a new study suggests.

According to data released in the September issue of Pediatrics, one in six parents of children with asthma is more concerned about the side effects of asthma medications than their child's need for the drugs. Addressing parental worries may increase adherence to needed asthma drugs, the researchers said.

An estimated 10 million children in the United States suffer with asthma, yet only half of prescribed medications are taken daily as directed.

"Children today can be virtually symptom-free, thanks to modern preventive medications," lead author Kelly Conn, of the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a prepared statement. "But kids rely on their parents to make health decisions for them, so we need to know what parents are thinking as we partner with them to achieve this goal."

Conn's team interviewed parents of 622 Michigan children who reported using at least one preventive asthma medication. The parents completed a Beliefs About Medications Questionnaire which contrasts parents' belief in the need for the medication against their worry about taking medications on a regular basis. Worries might include concerns about side effects or whether the medication is habit-forming.

The data showed that 77 percent of parents felt their child's need for the medications outweighed their concerns about pharmaceutical safety. However, 17 percent were more concerned about the drugs' potential to harm their child than they were convinced of its necessity. The remaining 6 percent were torn.

The researchers also asked the parents to complete a Medication Adherence Scale, which assesses how well they help keep their children on the medication regimen.

The study results showed that parents' beliefs affected how regularly their kids received the medications. Parents who believed in the need for the medications were more likely to keep their kids on track with the drugs. Still, only 14 percent of parents reported perfect adherence to the asthma medicine plan.

"These findings suggest a great deal of promise for improving symptom control just by addressing parents' worries and providing accurate information about medication side effects," Conn said.

Additionally, the study found that minority parents were more likely to worry about the drugs' side effects than believe in the necessity of medication. This is concerning, Conn said, because minority children are at greater risk for asthma.

More information

To learn more about childhood asthma, visit the American Lung Association.



-- Madeline Vann



SOURCE: University of Rochester, news release, Sept. 4, 2007


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Children suffer the most when parents divorce
2. Teens listen to parents about smoking
3. Smoking may be influenced by Parents
4. Few Parents Help Kids Fight Acne
5. Parents Should Look For Signs Of Children Becoming Overweight
6. HIV-positive Parents Require More Counseling
7. Parents understand better the hearing loss problem in children if counseled
8. Teaching parents to deal with behavior problems in children
9. Parents Should Beware of Violent Video Games
10. Risk Of Pre-eclampsia May Be In The Genes Of The Parents.
11. Pediatricians Need To Talk To Parents Of Overweight Kids
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2017)... ... ... In any business, follow up is critical to success. It is the ... treatment, there will always be some patients who can’t or won’t make a immediate ... when it comes to presenting treatment. After the patient leaves, most practices end ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... NEW YORK, NY (PRWEB) , ... May 26, ... ... Advisory Board (SAB) met this week to review more than eighty-nine grant ... both experienced and emerging young scientists in the Parkinson’s field.     , The American ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... Somnoware, a leading ... sleep monitor with its Somnoware Sleep Device Interface (SDI). Somnoware SDI is a ... operations. With this platform, initializing devices and importing studies are just one-click operations. ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... ... On May 24, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projected that the amended ... would result in 23 million Americans losing their health insurance by 2026 as compared ... Affordable Care Act (ACA). , “It is clear from the CBO analysis that ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... ... Lowe acts as host and helps educate and inform the public using the “Informed” ... reconnect with America as it explores some of the best places to hike and ... inventive new place for a family vacation, and have discovered hiking. Many will agree ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/18/2017)... -- Bayer announced today that the latest research from across ... 53 rd Annual Meeting of the American Society ... Chicago . The ... and thyroid cancers, as well as lymphomas, and includes ... of copanlisib in patients with relapsed or refractory follicular ...
(Date:5/11/2017)... -- Thornhill Research Inc. ( Toronto, Ontario, Canada ... five-year, firm-fixed-priced, indefinite-quantity/indefinite-delivery contract by the U.S. Department ... ( Ottawa, Ontario, Canada ) to ... to patients requiring emergency medical procedures in a ... have been a longtime partner with Thornhill Research ...
(Date:5/10/2017)... 10, 2017 Radiology has become the number ... have also spiraled to the number one ranking as ... than ever before as the most complete and reliable ... with lower back pain an MRI may confirm a ... pain, resulting in entirely different treatment protocols.  In these ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: