Navigation Links
PSA 'Nanotest' May Spot Prostate Cancer's Return After Surgery
Date:10/19/2009

Screen could boost accuracy but is still years away from approval, experts say

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A new test that could revolutionize the treatment of men following prostate cancer surgery has worked well in a small, early trial, researchers report.

Using nanotechnology, the researchers were able to detect prostate-specific antigen (PSA), the cancer-associated protein, at levels far below what is now possible with older technology, explained Chad A. Mirkin, lead author of a report published online Oct. 19 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"This could knock years off our current ability to detect a recurrence of cancer," said Mirkin, a professor of chemistry at Northwestern University in Chicago.

But it will be "a number of years" before the assay, or test, undergoes the larger-scale testing and vetting needed for approval of its use in medical practice, said Dr. C. Shad Thaxton, assistant professor of urology at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine, one of Mirkin's collaborators in development of the test.

The ultra-sensitive PSA test uses gold particles that are just 30 nanometers in diameter and have antibodies to PSA as well as strands of DNA, the basic genetic molecule, attached to them. The combination allows detection of PSA at levels 300 times lower than is now possible, Mirkin said.

PSA testing is controversial when it is used to screen for prostate cancer, he acknowledged. "But no one is arguing that a rising PSA level is not a marker of recurrence," Mirkin said.

He envisions use of the PSA nanotest routinely in men after prostate surgery. "It can stratify the population post-operatively," Mirkin said. "About 42 percent of the time there will be no recurrence, and this test will allow us to determine that years earlier than we can with conventional tools."

If rapidly rising PSA levels are detected, "there is no definitive therapy, but we can offer experimental chemotherapy or radiotherapy and can validate whether those therapies are working," he said.

That knowledge could be invaluable, the researchers believe. "If the treatment is not working, we can try a different approach," Thaxton said.

The journal report describes use of the nanotest for 18 men who had prostate cancer surgery. A larger study, with 260 participants, is also under way at Northwestern. "We hope to have data by the end of the year," Mirkin said.

Even larger studies that are necessary to validate the assay could start "within a year or two," Thaxton said.

Both Mirkin and Thaxton are stockholders in Nanosphere, Inc., the company that has licensed the nanotechnology from Northwestern and is applying it to a wide variety of medical tests.

"They have six FDA approvals already," Mirkin said of the company's medical nanotechnology tests. Approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is required for a test to be used in medical practice in the United States.

For now, caution is needed until widespread studies are done, said Dr. Durado Brooks, director of prostate and colorectal cancers at the American Cancer Society.

"We're talking about only 18 patients, but more importantly, we still don't know if this is clinically significant," Brooks said. "If we find a recurrence earlier, does it make a difference if we treat it earlier? We don't know if it will make a difference long-term."

While he called the work "exciting," Brooks said "it is way too early in the game to tell whether it will have clinical significance."

More information

For more on PSA testing, see the U.S. National Institutes of Health.



SOURCES: Chad A. Mirkin, Ph.D, professor, chemistry, Northwestern University, Chicago; C. Shad Thaxton, M.D., assistant professor, urology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago; Durado Brooks, M.D., director, prostate and colorectal cancers, American Cancer Society, Atlanta; Oct. 19, 2009, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Detecting the undetectable in prostate cancer screening
2. Impotence, Incontinence Risk Casts Doubt on High-Tech Prostate Surgery
3. SRI International Awarded a Department of Defense Laboratory-Clinical Transition Grant to Advance SRIs Novel Anticancer Agents for Prostate Cancer Treatment
4. Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy shows advantages, but also certain complications
5. PMH clinicians map group at high risk for aggressive, hidden prostate cancer
6. Prostate cancer gives a new outlook on life
7. UNC expert: Better decision support tools needed for prostate cancer screening choice
8. Mayo researchers find few side effects from radiation treatment given after prostate cancer surgery
9. Swiss study finds income affects prostate cancer patients survival
10. Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study
11. Study reveals 2/3 of prostate cancer patients do not need treatment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... WI (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... As ... in medicine known as “patient engagement.” The patient is doing more than filling out ... partners. , “There is an increasing emphasis in health care and research on ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... certification process to promote standards of excellence for the field of eating disorders, ... March 22 – 25, 2018 in Orlando, Florida at the Omni Resort at ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori R. Somekh, founder of ... ElderCounsel, a national organization of elder law and special needs planning attorneys. “Membership in ... It also provides a forum to network with elder law attorneys nationwide,” said Somekh. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... The Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of Somerset Hills is ... vendors and unique items from across the nation, this holiday-themed event will raise funds ... by the VNA. The boutique will be open Saturday, November 4 (10:00 a.m. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of ... popular and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, Revelation. The Book of Revelation ... scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it off as mere rubbish, but Yisrayl Hawkins ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... --  Divoti USA will engrave and process all ... the latest FDA requirements, which stipulates new criteria regarding medical device ... of Medical ID jewelry such as Medical ID Bracelets, can rest ... terms of the new FDA requirements . ... Divoti offers this dark mark fiber laser engraving ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... , Oct. 11, 2017  True Health, ... has amplified its effort during National Breast Cancer ... hereditary cancer risks. ... Clinical Oncology calculated that more than 10 million ... inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and have not ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... , Oct. 6, 2017   Provista, ... more than $100 billion in purchasing power, today announced ... and information. The Newsroom is the online ... industry trends, infographics, expert bios, news releases, slideshows and ... access to a wealth of resources at their fingertips, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: