Navigation Links
Ovarian cancer finding may be a 'win-win' for at-risk women who wish to have a family
Date:4/7/2011

PORTLAND, Ore. Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's Oregon National Primate Research Center may have good news for women at high-risk for ovarian cancer who also want to have children. The research suggests that a layer of cells, which serve as the "breeding ground" for ovarian cancer, may be removed yet allow the women to have children. This would be a vast improvement over the current prevention strategy for women at high risk for ovarian cancer: Removal of the ovaries entirely. The research is published in the current online edition of the journal Human Reproduction. It will also appear in a future printed edition of the journal.

The new treatment approach being tested at OHSU focuses on a layer of cells that surround the ovaries called ovarian surface epithelium. These cells, which have no known function, are where ovarian cancer takes root. To conduct the research, scientists washed away the ovarian surface epithelium in healthy female monkeys through minimally invasive surgery.

Following the procedure, the animals were closely observed to determine if removal of the cells changed function of the ovaries themselves. This observation revealed that the animals' ovaries produced eggs at a normal rate, as well as estrogen and progesterone in normal cyclic patterns. The procedure did not appear to affect the health of the ovaries or the overall health of the animals.

Because women with a family history of the disease are at a much higher risk for ovarian cancer themselves, many of these women choose to have their ovaries removed as a precaution. Of course for young women, this can be a major quality of life issue as the treatment prevents future childbirth and removes the primary source of a woman's estrogen.

"While additional studies are necessary, this procedure suggests that we may have found a much less invasive strategy for preventing ovarian cancer in high-risk women while at the same time maintaining fertility," said Jay Wright, Ph.D., a scientist in the Division of Reproductive Sciences at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. "This is a key finding in monkeys because their reproductive system is so similar to the human female reproductive system."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Newman
newmanj@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. How to make the best decisions when at high risk for breast or ovarian cancer
2. Foster Friess commits up to $50,000 to help TGen fight ovarian cancer
3. Study finds delay in referrals for older women with ovarian cancer
4. Pre-Diagnosis Diet Linked to Ovarian Cancer Survival
5. Only women with Western Swedish breast cancer gene run higher risk of ovarian cancer
6. Ovarian cancer study offers vital clues for new therapies
7. Researchers identify a new breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene
8. Study Makes Strides in Understanding Ovarian Cancer
9. PMH cancer researchers link ovarian hormone to breast stem cells growth
10. CA-125 change over time shows promise as screening tool for early detection of ovarian cancer
11. Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer Moves Closer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... Intrigma, ... today that Legacy Health is expanding its use of Intrigma’s cloud-based physician scheduling ... successful initial proof of concept. The Portland, Oregon based health system conducted a ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... a special type of surgical procedure that can be used to diagnose and treat ... instruments can be inserted. These instruments include a special lighting system and lens that ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... , ... Finding the right way to address a patient’s condition before it worsens will ultimately ... board. , “You do the right thing, at the right time, at the right dose ... said Leonard M. Fromer, MD, FAAFP, from Group Practice Forum. “Even if the cost of ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... , ... May 03, 2016 , ... Dave Newberry, broker/owner ... Interim Care Center (PICC) annual fundraiser luncheon on Friday, May 20. “We have ... the smallest victims of drug abuse,” said Newberry. , PICC is a local Kent, ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... It has just been announced ... for five events throughout the month of May. , Uldrich is the author of ... outlets. He also frequently appears on the Science Channel’s FutureScape and Discovery Channel’s Inside ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... YORK , April 28, 2016  The blood ... 275 million dollars, according to Kalorama Information and The ... typing, immunoassays and nucleic acid testing.  The healthcare research ... made progress in developing blood collection stations and in ... made in Kalorama Information,s report, Blood Testing ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Dr. Vivek Ahuja , George ... phen Schmidt Join the Growing Organization ... for life sciences, today announced key new leaders have joined the ... a growing business.  This will bolster the company,s safety business unit ... ArisGlobal in the position of Vice President - Safety. George has ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016  ValGenesis, Inc., ... Management Solutions (VLMS) today announced that a ... for sufferers of chronic kidney failure has ... manage their corporate validation process. The global ... software solution to manage their validation processes ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: