Navigation Links
Organ Transplant Drug Keeps Immune System in Check
Date:2/3/2010

In lab tests, it fights rejection and reduces need for immunosuppressive meds, study finds

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a new drug to the heavy regimen of immunosuppressant drugs given to organ transplant recipients not only prevented rejection of the new organ but also cut down on the amount of immunosuppressant drugs needed, a new study finds.

Researchers hope the experimental drug will eventually preclude the need for any immunosuppressant drugs after an organ transplant.

"Current drugs are quite toxic when it comes to long-term survival. There are side effects, and organs suffer because of the drugs," said Dr. Mohanram Narayanan, associate professor of internal medicine at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine in Temple and chief of clinical transplantation at Scott & White Healthcare. "This is a definite step in the right direction."

"The hope is that this will translate into a new treatment to prevent organ rejection in transplant patients," added Agnes Azimzadeh, second author of a study published Feb. 3 in Science Translational Medicine.

"The other long-term goal is not only to prevent the rejection of organs more efficiently than is done currently but also to induce tolerance to the graft itself," added Azimzadeh, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.

"That means that we modulate, we tweak, we educate the immune system of the transplant recipient so it recognizes the graft as [its own] cells rather than recognizing it as foreign. We would educate the immune system so well that at some point we could stop or decrease significantly immunosuppressive drugs that the patient has to take."

Organ transplantation is the only hope for many patients experiencing kidney, heart or other organ failure, but the body's innate immune system perceives the new organ as a threat and sends out immune soldiers to attack it.

As a result, transplant recipients must take immunosuppressive drugs with major toxic side effects for the rest of their lives.

And the organ will eventually be rejected anyway, said the study authors.

Existing drugs aim at the immune system's T cells which, by attacking or not attacking a new organ, can make or break the transplant.

T cells are controlled by two pathways that can activate or inhibit release of the cells.

Current immunosuppressive drugs target both pathways, meaning that T cells can't do their regular job of clearing legitimate threats to the system, making organ recipients vulnerable to infection.

These scientists blocked only one pathway with a more specific antibody, leaving the immune system less reactive to the body's new resident.

None of the monkeys who were given either heart or kidney transplants with the usual immunosuppressive drugs plus the CD28 blocker had rejected their organs three months after receiving the drug.

More information

The United Network for Organ Sharing has more on organ transplantation.



SOURCES: Mohanram Narayanan, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and chief of clinical transplantation, director of nephrology/hypertension, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, Texas; Agnes Azimzadeh, Ph.D., assistant professor of surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore; Feb. 3, 2010, Science Translational Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Discovery Health and National Organization for Rare Disorders Partner for Second Annual Rare Disease Day With the Premiere of the Special DISEASE DETECTIVES
2. New Harris Corporation Program Assists Healthcare Organizations in Implementing CONNECT Solution for NHIN Connectivity
3. AT&T Launches Mobile Paging and Group Notification Solution for Healthcare Organizations
4. BMEGateway Celebrates its 20th Anniversary and Welcomes Dr. William Morgan
5. Nationwide Vote to Determine Best Organ Donation-Themed Movie
6. Which Health Care Organizations Are Advancing Consumer Protection and Empowerment?
7. Hacker Attacks Targeting Healthcare Organizations Doubled in the 4th Quarter of 2009 According to SecureWorks Data
8. European Cancer Organization supports a revision of the EU Clinical Trials Directive
9. Ronald McDonald House Charities(R) (RMHC(R)) Awards Nearly $3 Million to Non-Profit Organizations
10. SimpleWebBox Offers Free Websites for Non-Profit Organizations
11. FFCHS Launches Online Petition Against Organized Stalking and Electronic Torture
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... Milford, NJ (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... weekend at scenic Alexandria Park in Milford, NJ. This free event, sponsored by ... and physical activity. The fun run is geared towards children of all ages; ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian history of the United States and ... of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, Millie, have six ... years in the Navy. Following his career as a naval aviator and carrier ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( https://isocomforter.com ), one of the ... new design of the shoulder pad. The shoulder pad provides optimal support and ... pain while using cold therapy. By utilizing ice and water that is circulated from ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... is the recipient of a 2017 Folio Magazine Eddie Digital Award for ‘Best B-to-B ... York City on October 11, 2017. , The annual award competition recognizes editorial and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... In the United States, single-family ... some states—like New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Texas, Virginia, Connecticut, and California—the average ... extremely low property-tax rates, which contributes to the relatively lower cost of living ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/4/2017)...  South Korean-based healthcare product Development Company I.M. Lab ... Kickstarter. The device will educate the user about ,proper, ... efficiency compared to the dated and pricey CPR training ... of the compression for a more informed CPR training. ... raise $5,000. cprCUBE ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... OBP Medical , a leading ... today announced regulatory approval from Brazil,s ... Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA)) to market ... with integrated LED light source and smoke evacuation ... of a tissue pocket or cavity during surgical ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ) will ... 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. Lilly will also ... investment community and media to further detail the company,s ... at 9 a.m. Eastern time. Investors, media and the ... conference call through a link that will be posted ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: