Navigation Links
Only women with Western Swedish breast cancer gene run higher risk of ovarian cancer
Date:4/5/2010

Previous research has shown that women with breast cancer are more likely than other women to develop ovarian cancer, but now researchers from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have shown that actually only women with a known Western Swedish mutation behind hereditary breast cancer run this increased risk of ovarian cancer.

The study, published in the journal Acta Oncologica, shows that the increased risk of ovarian cancer is linked to a known mutation in women with breast cancer in Western Sweden. The research team had previously identified a special mutation in the breast cancer gene BRCA1 originating with some distant forefather on Sweden's West Coast many generations back. The mutation is often seen in families where three or more members develop breast and/or ovarian cancer and where someone under 50 is diagnosed with breast and/or ovarian cancer.

Our previous research showed that Western Swedish women with breast cancer are more likely to develop ovarian cancer than women diagnosed with breast cancer in other parts of the country," says Per Karlsson, associate professor from the Department of Oncology and leader of the research team at the Cancer Genetics Clinic at Sahlgrenska University Hospital.

Most ovarian tumours are benign, especially in younger women, but more than 700 women in Sweden are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, some 30-40 of them as a result of the Western Swedish BRCA1 mutation. Now the researchers have shown that the increased risk of ovarian cancer among women diagnosed with breast cancer is due solely to this known mutation in the breast cancer gene BRCA1. Their research results reveal that women diagnosed with breast cancer who do not have this mutation do not run an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

"This means that we can focus our investigations and screening on families where many relatives have had breast and ovarian cancer," says Karlsson.

As this elevated risk of ovarian cancer affects only a very small proportion of women with breast cancer, the next step is to provide patients with clearer information about the risks associated with breast cancer when visiting the doctor.

"There is also research under way in the cancer genetics field which may mean that, in future, patients can receive more specific screening, and that cancer patients can expect a more personalised treatment," says Karlsson, who believes that this work could lead to fewer screenings and fewer side-effects from cancer treatments.


'/>"/>

Contact: Per Karlsson
per.karlsson@oncology.gu.se
46-313-428-652
University of Gothenburg
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Only 1 in 4 Pregnant Women Gets Enough Exercise
2. Breast cancer screening program should give higher importance to younger women
3. Novel soy germ-based dietary supplement, SE5-OH containing natural S-Equol, examined for safety and influence on hormones in pre- and post-menopausal women
4. Breast Cancer Survivor Tackles the Missing Link: Inspiring Event Offers Women Real Life Advice to Thrive After Medical Treatment Ends
5. Taking Care of Your 'Girls': A Fun and Open Forum for Young Women Hosted by Abington Memorial Hospital
6. Women Would Welcome At-Home Test for STDs
7. Obesity, Alcohol Among Factors Linked to Womens Gout Risk
8. Minority women least likely to gain access to a doctor, study says
9. Obesity, hypertension, alcohol and diuretic use -- gout risk factors for women
10. Black Women in U.S. Comfortable With Formula Feeding
11. Women, Diabetics Fall Fast Into Medicare Doughnut Hole
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/11/2016)... Ore. (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... Medicaid coverage results in significantly higher rates of several common cancer screenings, especially ... resulting in better outcomes and survival rates. , The study,“What Does Medicaid ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... campaign to celebrate and raise awareness of Nestlé KITKAT as the first global confectionery ... the lives of cocoa farmers and the quality of their product, through activities that ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... PA (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... As ... offer two webinars in February 2016. Each webinar features a dynamic expert and ... to benefit their athletes, patients and facilities. Both events are free to attend, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... Emergency rooms ... harder to find. Unfortunately, this can leave patients with dental emergencies at risk of ... is now offering emergency dental care. , Common dental emergencies include:, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... San Diego, will bring together more than 200 of the country’s top healthcare ... the future. , “The true benefit of the Forum is the provider-centric perspective, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... A Worldwide Clinical Trials expert will ... Victoria Park Plaza in London , 24-25 ... and future advances for late phase research on Wednesday, 24 ... , associate director of project management at Worldwide, will focus ... regulations and standards in late phase research. ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Feb. 10, 2016  LexisNexis® Risk Solutions, a ... announced the launch of LexisNexis Provider Performance ... helps improve and optimize the quality and efficiency ... using severity-adjusted scores. By measuring provider performance through ... to deliver better outcomes, improve the patient experience ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Feb. 10, 2016 Mast Therapeutics, Inc. ... clinical-stage therapies for sickle cell disease and heart failure, ... of 29,090,910 units at a price to the public ... share of the Company,s common stock and one warrant ... at an exercise price of $0.42 per share. The ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: