Navigation Links
Only women with Western Swedish breast cancer gene run higher risk of ovarian cancer
Date:4/5/2010

Previous research has shown that women with breast cancer are more likely than other women to develop ovarian cancer, but now researchers from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have shown that actually only women with a known Western Swedish mutation behind hereditary breast cancer run this increased risk of ovarian cancer.

The study, published in the journal Acta Oncologica, shows that the increased risk of ovarian cancer is linked to a known mutation in women with breast cancer in Western Sweden. The research team had previously identified a special mutation in the breast cancer gene BRCA1 originating with some distant forefather on Sweden's West Coast many generations back. The mutation is often seen in families where three or more members develop breast and/or ovarian cancer and where someone under 50 is diagnosed with breast and/or ovarian cancer.

Our previous research showed that Western Swedish women with breast cancer are more likely to develop ovarian cancer than women diagnosed with breast cancer in other parts of the country," says Per Karlsson, associate professor from the Department of Oncology and leader of the research team at the Cancer Genetics Clinic at Sahlgrenska University Hospital.

Most ovarian tumours are benign, especially in younger women, but more than 700 women in Sweden are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, some 30-40 of them as a result of the Western Swedish BRCA1 mutation. Now the researchers have shown that the increased risk of ovarian cancer among women diagnosed with breast cancer is due solely to this known mutation in the breast cancer gene BRCA1. Their research results reveal that women diagnosed with breast cancer who do not have this mutation do not run an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

"This means that we can focus our investigations and screening on families where many relatives have had breast and ovarian cancer," says Karlsson.

As this elevated risk of ovarian cancer affects only a very small proportion of women with breast cancer, the next step is to provide patients with clearer information about the risks associated with breast cancer when visiting the doctor.

"There is also research under way in the cancer genetics field which may mean that, in future, patients can receive more specific screening, and that cancer patients can expect a more personalised treatment," says Karlsson, who believes that this work could lead to fewer screenings and fewer side-effects from cancer treatments.


'/>"/>

Contact: Per Karlsson
per.karlsson@oncology.gu.se
46-313-428-652
University of Gothenburg
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Only 1 in 4 Pregnant Women Gets Enough Exercise
2. Breast cancer screening program should give higher importance to younger women
3. Novel soy germ-based dietary supplement, SE5-OH containing natural S-Equol, examined for safety and influence on hormones in pre- and post-menopausal women
4. Breast Cancer Survivor Tackles the Missing Link: Inspiring Event Offers Women Real Life Advice to Thrive After Medical Treatment Ends
5. Taking Care of Your 'Girls': A Fun and Open Forum for Young Women Hosted by Abington Memorial Hospital
6. Women Would Welcome At-Home Test for STDs
7. Obesity, Alcohol Among Factors Linked to Womens Gout Risk
8. Minority women least likely to gain access to a doctor, study says
9. Obesity, hypertension, alcohol and diuretic use -- gout risk factors for women
10. Black Women in U.S. Comfortable With Formula Feeding
11. Women, Diabetics Fall Fast Into Medicare Doughnut Hole
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... California (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With ... fit their specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... customizable and all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong ... Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. ... to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and ... their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The Wellness at Work Awards took ... the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one of 42 businesses to receive ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... plastic surgery procedures that most people are unfamiliar with. The article goes on to ... known procedures, but also many of these less common operations such as calf and ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World ... with chronic pain and the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center ... with Sickle Cell Disease. , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the ... Tests" report to their offering. ... The World Market for Companion Diagnostics covers the ... analysis in the report includes the following: ... Kits) by Region (N. America, EU, ROW), 2015-2020 , ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016  Arkis BioSciences, ... less invasive and more durable cerebrospinal fluid treatments, ... funding.  The Series-A funding is led by Innova ... Fund, and other private investors.  Arkis, new financing ... instrumentation and the market release of its in-licensed ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has ... by Type (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), Inorganic Chemical), ... Parenteral) - Global Forecast to 2021" report to ... The global pharmaceutical excipients market is projected to reach ... 6.1% in the forecast period 2016 to 2021. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: