Navigation Links
One Therapy Session in ER Can Cut Teen Violence

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Having a therapist talk to kids who go to an emergency room with a violent injury and who also admit to previous alcohol use can reduce repeat episodes, new research finds.

The authors calculated that for every 10 kids seen, a single 30-minute intervention would prevent one violent episode in the future.

The study was funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

"The leading cause of death for adolescents who reside in inner city settings is violence and other injuries," said Maureen Walton, lead author of a study appearing in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. "These adolescents are less likely to attend school regularly, they're not likely to have a primary care physician and the emergency room is a popular place for a variety of reasons. We decided this would be a good setting for prevention."

Previous studies had shown good results from similar interventions addressing alcohol but no studies have yet looked at violence. These authors combined the two.

"Kids who drink are also likely to fight, whether they actually drink at the time of the fight, and are likely to be involved in other problematic behaviors," Walton explained.

These authors tested outcomes of a program called SafERteens. The study involved more than 700 kids aged 14 to 18 who had visited an emergency department in Flint, Mich., from noon and 11 p.m. any day of the week between September 2006 and September 2009.

Kids who admitted to using alcohol or being involved in a fight in the past year were randomly assigned to three groups: one in which kids talked with a therapist (along with computerized feedback and structure); a computer-only group in which a virtual "buddy" walked kids through a set of questions including some about goals and reasons to avoid drinking to reach those goals; and a control group receiving a brochure with referrals to community resources.

After three months, participants in the therapist arm showed a 70 percent to 76 percent reduction in violence, including peer aggression, compared with the controls.

At six months, those in the therapist group also had a greater reduction in alcohol consequences than those in the computer intervention group, although both showed improvement.

"The therapist intervention is what showed promise for violence," Walton reported. "For alcohol, both the therapist and the computer-alone interventions were effective as compared to the brochure."

The researchers noted some limitations to the study, including self-reported data, and are now collecting 12-month follow-up data.

Walton reported that follow-up rates exceeded 85 percent in the study and that although a lot of the participants frequently moved from home to home, the researchers were able to track them down by simply calling their cell phones or by locating them on MySpace or Facebook.

How realistic is it to think emergency rooms across the country will adopt this or a similar approach?

"There is some cost. The hospital administration is not going to see the results but at the societal/community level we will definitely see results," said Dr. Michael Kamali, acting chair of the department of emergency medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. "But if you've been in an emergency department on any given evening, there's a lot of trauma. If you can influence life-long decisions, hopefully this gives pause."

The emergency room at the University of Rochester hospital admits kids who are likely to experience another trauma within days. "It's a cooling-off period so we can avert having them be a victim again, and so they don't retaliate," said Kamali.

Walton said that some alcohol interventions were reimbursed, and that she and her colleagues are reaching out to emergency rooms across the country about implementing similar measures.

More information

The National Library of Medicine has more on teen violence.

SOURCES: Maureen A. Walton, Ph.D., research associate professor, department of psychiatry, Addiction Research Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Michael Kamali, M.D., acting chair, department of emergency medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center; Aug. 4, 2010, Journal of the American Medical Association.

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy may protect women against brain aneurysms
2. Vanishing bile duct syndrome secondary to anti-retroviral therapy in HIV
3. NYU Langone offers vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy for localized prostate cancer
4. Depression overlooked in patients with hepatitis C; compromising HCV therapy
5. FDA accepts historical controls for epilepsy monotherapy studies
6. John Theurer Cancer Center first cancer center in N.J. to acquire new radiotherapy system
7. New recommendations issued for use of cetuximab in colon cancer therapy
8. Stem cell transplantation of therapy-resistant chronic leukemia successful
9. OU researcher developing novel therapy for Alzheimers disease
10. Scientists design new delivery device for gene therapy
11. Revolutionary therapy slows tumor growth in advanced breast cancer, Penn research reports
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
One Therapy Session in ER Can Cut Teen Violence
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... Q-Suite, announces the incorporation of Asterisk 11 LTS (Long Term Support) into its ... 11 LTS brings Q-Suite 5.10 up-to-date with a version of Asterisk that will ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... ... Inevitably when people think Thanksgiving, they also think Holiday sales and start ... and Cyber Monday massage chair sales to receive the best pricing on ... find the best massage chair deals, they can see all of the coupons in ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Somu Sivaramakrishnan announced today that ... Somu now offers travelers, value and care based Travel Services, including exclusive pricing ... well as, cabin upgrades and special amenities such as, shore excursions, discounted fares, ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... NE (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... Jobs ... searched by healthcare professionals and offered by healthcare staffing agency Aureus Medical Group ... during the month of October 2015 among those searching for healthcare jobs through the ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... 2015 , ... WorldCare International, Inc., the first company to ... Benefits Conference. The Employee Benefits Conference was hosted by the International Foundation of ... 2015. The conference was held at the Hawaii Convention Center in Honolulu, Oahu, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015  The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), ... the March of Dimes cheered today,s signature into ... Act of 2015 (S.799), which takes much-needed ... exposed to drugs, such as opioids, and to ... three organizations have worked together leading advocacy efforts ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015 On Tuesday, November 24, 2015, ... against Wright Medical Technology, Inc. for product liability ... hip implant device, awarded $11 million in favor ... trial and three days of deliberations, the jury ... defectively designed and unreasonably dangerous, and that Wright ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Israel , November 25, 2015 ... KTOV ) (TASE: KTOV), a biopharmaceutical company focused ... treatment of various clinical conditions, today announced the closing ... American Depository Shares ( ADSs ), each representing 20 ... up to 3,158,900 ADSs. The ADSs and warrants were ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: