Navigation Links
Obesity Takes Years Off Your Life
Date:3/17/2009

It's similar to smoking when it comes to effect on longevity, researchers note,,,,

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Being obese can shorten your life, a new study shows.

"Moderate obesity typically shortens life span by about three years," said researcher Gary Whitlock, from the Clinical Trial Service Unit at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. "By moderate obesity, I mean weighing about a third more than is ideal, which for most people would mean being about 50 or 60 pounds overweight."

More than one in three middle-aged Americans are now in this category, Whitlock said. "By contrast, weighing twice your ideal weight -- say, an extra 150 pounds -- shortens life span by about 10 years," he added.

This obesity level is still not common, but it equals the known 10-year reduction in life span caused by smoking. "So, smoking is about as dangerous as being severely obese, and about three times as dangerous as being moderately obese," he said.

The report is published in the March 18 online edition of The Lancet.

For the study, Whitlock and other members of the Prospective Studies Collaboration collected data on 894,576 men and women who participated in 57 studies. The people in these studies came primarily from western Europe and North America. Their average body-mass index (BMI) was 25.

BMI is a calculation that expresses a relationship between height and weight. People are considered underweight if their BMI is less than 18.5, normal weight when the BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9, overweight when BMI is between 25 and 29.9, and obese when BMI is 30 or more, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

The researchers found that men and women whose BMI was between 22.5 and 25 lived the longest. For a person 5 feet 7 inches tall, his or her optimum weight would be about 154 pounds, they noted.

For those with a BMI over 25, every 10 to 12 pound increase translated to about a 30 percent increased risk of dying. In addition, there was a 40 percent increase in the risk for heart disease, stroke and other vascular disease, a 60 percent to 120 percent increased risk of diabetes, liver disease or kidney disease, a 10 percent increased risk of cancer, and a 20 percent increased risk for lung disease, the researchers reported.

"Obesity causes kidney disease, liver disease and several types of cancer, but the most common way it kills is by causing stroke and, most importantly, heart disease. Obesity causes heart disease by pushing up blood pressure, by interfering with blood cholesterol levels, and by bringing on diabetes," Whitlock said.

People who are moderately obese with a BMI in the 30 to 35 range reduced their life span by two and four years. For those who are severely obese with BMIs between 40 and 45, their life span was reduced by eight to 10 years. That's comparable to the effects of smoking, Whitlock said.

In fact, people whose weight was below normal also died earlier, due mainly to smoking-related diseases, the researchers noted.

"If you are obese and smoke, then, above all else, quit smoking," Whitlock said. "If you are obese and don't smoke, then don't start, and do what you can to avoid further weight gain. By avoiding further weight gain, you may well live a few years longer than you otherwise would do. By quitting smoking, a smoker can expect to gain several extra years of life -- about as many as a severely obese person might gain by shedding half of his or her body weight."

Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine, said this study confirms that the obesity epidemic is "the clear and present danger many of us knew it to be."

The association between BMI and mortality has been challenged in the scientific community, due in part to uncertainty about weight estimates and debate about measurement methods. "Here we have an emphatic reaffirmation of the fundamental issue: Overweight and obesity take years from life," Katz said.

"We know that, in many ways, BMI is a crude measure of the health risks associated with obesity, since not all excess body fat is created equal," he said. "Weight gained around the middle tends to be most dangerous, so for those subject to this pattern, risks may indeed be higher than this study suggests. For those with lower body weight gain, risks may be lower."

A study published in the Nov. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine also found that where weight is centered is a risk factor. Men with the largest waist circumference had more than double the risk of death, and women with the largest waist circumference increased their risk of death by 78 percent.

More information

For more about obesity, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Gary Whitlock, Ph.D., Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, U.K.; David L. Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; March 18, 2009, The Lancet, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Virus Could Help Drive Obesity
2. Surgery for severe obesity saves lives
3. Obesity Doesnt Always Equal Diabetes
4. Obesity Rate in U.S. Still Climbing
5. Treating diabetes during pregnancy can break link to childhood obesity
6. ZIP codes and property values predict obesity rates
7. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
8. Research Links TV/Video Game Playing With Child Obesity; Health Experts Back a New Approach
9. UT Southwesterns obesity research receives $22 million NIH Roadmap grant
10. Genaera Announces Formation of Scientific Advisory Board for Obesity Drug Candidate Trodusquemine (MSI-1436)
11. Cities Say Restaurant Nutrition Information Crucial in Fighting Obesity
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Obesity Takes Years Off Your Life
(Date:3/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... over $100,000 for its innovative EcoQube Frame vertical micro-veggies garden on Kickstarter ... demand for the product – with nearly 2,000 consumers (and counting) already backing ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... On ... Advanced ERISA Benefit Claims Litigation seminar in Chicago, Illinois. She will present ... majority of cases litigated under ERISA involve claims for long-term disability benefits. ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... Gastro Health ... partnership to prep patients for colonoscopy at the HyGIeaCare® Center that is to ... Miami, FL. , The HyGIeaCare® Prep, cleared by the U.S. Food ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... Walk with God #TruthwithGrace”: a devotional journal chronicling the writer’s path toward true ... How to Walk with God #TruthwithGrace” is the creation of published author Lea ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... inspiring stories about real people of God in congregations across the United States. ... a Presbyterian minister ordained in 1964 who has served congregations in seven states ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... DUBLIN , Mar 24, 2017 Research ... Supplies - Global Strategic Business Report" report to their offering. ... The report provides separate comprehensive ... , Europe , Asia-Pacific , ... and forecasts are provided for the period 2015 through 2022. Also, a ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... 2017  Mirabilis Medical, a Seattle ... non-invasive surgery, announced today CE Mark authorization for ... uterine fibroids throughout the European Union.  The company ... the US Food and Drug Administration to begin ... the United States.  The Mirabilis System combines high-speed ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Mar 23, 2017 Research and Markets has ... Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global ... 6.9% over the next decade to reach approximately $3.5 billion by ... forecasts for all the given segments on global as well as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: