Navigation Links
Obesity Doesn't Always Equal Diabetes

Mouse study suggests that where the fat is stored is key

FRIDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity doesn't mean a person is destined to develop diabetes, experiments in mice suggest. Instead, it may all depend on where the fat is stored.

Mice that overate and were very obese still didn't become diabetic, because the activity of two hormones let them store extra calories in fat tissue rather than in their livers or heart muscle.

"What this mouse model shows is what we have appreciated clinically for a while," said lead researcher Philipp Scherer, a professor of internal medicine and director of the Touchstone Center for Diabetes Research at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

"Basically, it shows that for individuals who have the ability to expand their adipose [fat] tissue mass appropriately for the number of calories they take up, those individuals fare much better than someone who has a more reduced capacity to expand their adipose tissue," Scherer said.

If fat isn't stored in the adipose tissue, it ends up in the liver and muscles. That, in turn, causes significant insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes, Scherer explained.

In their experiments, Scherer's team showed that in genetically altered mice, an excess of adiponectin, a hormone linked to sensitivity to insulin, and a deficiency in leptin, a hormone that suppresses appetite, causes the mice to store excess calories in fat tissue instead of in liver, heart or muscle tissues, according to the report in the Aug. 23 online edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Scherer noted that in people as in mice, where fat is stored is largely determined by genetics. "You have a lot of obese individuals who are not type 2 diabetics, and you have lean individuals that can be type 2 diabetics," he said. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease, and it is most often tied to overweight or obesity.

All of this means that measuring fat as an indicator of general health might not hold up anymore, Scherer said. "It's really a matter of where we deposit these excess calories," he said. "Fat is a little like real estate, it's all about location, location, location."

Scherer hopes the outcome of his work will be finding ways to manipulate how and where fat is stored in people.

However, none of this should be seen as a free pass to become obese, Scherer said. "Exercise and reduction of food intake are the best ways to stay healthy," he said. "Most people can't prevent some fat from being stored in the liver and muscle," he added.

One expert agreed the finding does mimic what is seen in some people.

"It's too bad, we ain't mice," said Dr. Larry Deeb, president for medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association. "Clinically, there are people who are like those mice. They are significantly overweight, and yet, they don't have the insulin resistance," he said.

There might be therapeutic implications to this finding, if it could lead to a better understanding of why some people can become obese and not develop diabetes, and others don't, Deeb said.

However, there are other health consequences to being overweight besides diabetes, he noted. "Obese people wear out the knees and strain the heart and lungs and other body systems," Deeb said. "In addition, their quality of life suffers."

More information

For more on diabetes, visit the American Diabetes Association.

SOURCES: Philipp Scherer, Ph.D., professor of internal medicine, director, Touchstone Center for Diabetes Research at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas; Larry Deeb, M.D., president, medicine and science, American Diabetes Association; Aug. 23, 2007, online edition, Journal of Clinical Investigation

Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Lean Protein Could Be Key to Obesity Drugs
2. Breast Feeding prevents obesity later on in life
3. Obesity raises IVF miscarriage risk
4. Obesity a risk for pancreatic cancer
5. Starving leads to obesity
6. Obesity shortens lifespan
7. Antidepressant helps obesity
8. Is Obesity a risk factor?
9. Better Treatment for obesity
10. Asthma linked to obesity
11. Enzyme may be target for obesity drugs
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2015)... Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 ... ... growing natural beverage companies in the United States, today announced the release of ... Brew Coffee, and new Cranberry Cocktail Agua Fresca. All feature the unique flavor ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... ENGAGE, at HIMSS’s Patient Engagement Summit . HealthAware is a technology company ... health programs and interventions via mobile devices that provide a framework for the ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... CA (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 , ... ProText ... Pro X . With ProText Kinetic Panel, users can create energetic text animations in ... a preset into the Final Cut Pro X timeline and stylize the text. With ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 , ... Symposium Chairman, ... the 19th annual Dallas Cosmetic Symposium to be held March 2nd and 3rd, 2016. ... immediately afterwards, draws plastic surgeons and cosmetic physicians from around the world. , Key ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... PA (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 , ... In ... 2015 utility costs were 36 percent lower per square foot than in 2009. The ... actual cost of heating and cooling has decreased by eight percent. , According ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... 2015  Graduate students across the country, with ... will soon have the opportunity to learn about ... drug discovery and development process. Eli Lilly and ... 10 leaders from academic institutions to create an ... of Drug Development."  Lilly will formally unveil the ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... 13, 2015 anesthesia and respiratory ... billion by 2022, according to a new report by ... to their capability to resolve various environmental and lifestyle ... growth. --> anesthesia and respiratory devices market ... 2022, according to a new report by Grand View ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... 2015   Micell Technologies , Inc. today announced ... trials of its MiStent Sirolimus Eluting Absorbable Polymer Coronary ... presented at the 27th Annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics ( ... , October 11-15. TCT is the world,s largest ... was designed to optimize vessel healing in patients with ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: